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John Katzman

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SPORTS
July 4, 1989 | DAN LE BATARD, Times Staff Writer
Zan Mason, who usually has no trouble scoring, got only 550 of a possible 1,600 the first time he took the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT). Mason, an All-City 4-A player at Westchester High School, was awarded 400 of those 550 points for filling in his name and address correctly. Knowing that a National Collegiate Athletic Assn.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 1989 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Princeton Review, an organization that coaches high school students for their Scholastic Aptitude Tests, made more than $15 million last year, tutored thousands of youngsters and reported startling improvements in its pupils' test scores. And yet, despite the company's booming prosperity, top Review officers harbor an unusual corporate ambition: They want to lobby away the SAT itself, a move that could effectively strangle the Review's golden goose.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 1989 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Princeton Review, an organization that coaches high school students for their Scholastic Aptitude Tests, made more than $15 million last year, tutored thousands of youngsters and reported startling improvements in its pupils' test scores. And yet, despite the company's booming prosperity, top Review officers harbor an unusual corporate ambition: They want to lobby away the SAT itself, a move that could effectively strangle the Review's golden goose.
SPORTS
July 4, 1989 | DAN LE BATARD, Times Staff Writer
Zan Mason, who usually has no trouble scoring, got only 550 of a possible 1,600 the first time he took the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT). Mason, an All-City 4-A player at Westchester High School, was awarded 400 of those 550 points for filling in his name and address correctly. Knowing that a National Collegiate Athletic Assn.
SPORTS
August 5, 1989
John Katzman, president of the Princeton Review, claims that the Scholastic Aptitude Test is biased and that 50% of black women don't reach the National Collegiate Athletic Assn.'s SAT cutoff while only 1% of white men don't reach it. I do not argue with these statistics, but I wonder why he did not include the percentages of other minority groups when he presented his data. I have a hunch that a high percentage of Asians and Asian women reach the SAT cutoff, and my question to Mr. Katzman is this: How can the test be more biased toward one minority group than another?
NEWS
December 23, 1987 | Associated Press
The Educational Testing Service won a narrow victory under a court agreement ordering a leading test coaching firm to stop violating copyrights on SAT questions and to pay $52,000 in damages. The consent order, agreed to in U.S. District Court in Trenton, N.J., ended a two-year battle between ETS, which administers the Scholastic Aptitude Test and other standardized tests, and the Princeton Review Inc.
NEWS
August 16, 1985 | Associated Press
A firm that prepares students for the Scholastic Aptitude Test cannot use confidential test questions in its coaching program until a lawsuit by a national testing service is resolved, a federal judge ruled today. U.S. District Judge Clarkson S. Fisher also ordered employees of Princeton Review to refrain from registering for or taking exams sponsored by the Education Testing Service. The exams are used to determine whether students are admitted to some colleges.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 2006 | Arin Gencer, Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles schools have called on the Princeton Review to help students and teachers prepare for state standardized tests, under a $4.5-million, one-year contract. The company, known for its college-entrance exam tools, will periodically assess the progress of middle school and high school students in the Los Angeles Unified School District, using questions developed by teachers and staff.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 2001
University of California President Richard C. Atkinson's announcement this week that he will call on the UC regents and faculty to eliminate the SAT as a requirement for admission to the UC system was a bold stroke. It should provoke a sharp debate about a test that has had undue clout for too long. The SAT was first written early last century with the best of intentions: to open doors to potential leaders on the basis of talent and intelligence rather than the privilege of inheritance.
OPINION
August 7, 2004
John Katzman, Andy Lutz and Jon Hein of the Princeton Review (a SAT prep company) mock the College Board's plan to score student essays on the new SAT "holistically" ("New SAT Is So Old School," Opinion, Aug. 1). They compare the holistic scoring of short 25-minute essays to "measur(ing) ... karma" and to "taking only the first few pills of a course of antibiotics." Huh? Based on these misleading and truly bizarre analogies, I suppose it's a good thing for all present and future Princeton Review customers that the new SAT will omit verbal analogy questions.
NEWS
August 29, 2001 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
After years of narrowing the gap with males on the SAT college-entrance exam, female students in this year's high school graduating class fell further behind, the College Board reported Tuesday. The widening gap renewed questions about the fairness of the high-stakes test, which is used by the nation's top colleges and universities as a criterion for admission. The SAT has come under increased scrutiny since February, when UC President Richard C.
NEWS
November 1, 1990 | LARRY GORDON, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
A much-debated proposal to add a written essay as a required part of the Scholastic Aptitude Test has been rejected, College Board officials announced Wednesday. However, the nation's most widely used college admissions examination will undergo a major overhaul by 1994, with more emphasis on reading and less on multiple-choice questions.
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