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John Kenneth Galbraith

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OPINION
December 12, 1999 | Elizabeth Mehren, Elizabeth Mehren is New England bureau chief for The Times
The economy is thriving, boasts the president. Never been healthier, agrees Alan Greenspan. Buy, buy, buy, urges Wall Street. But in a grand, wood-paneled salon a mere percentage point from Harvard Yard, the guru of modern economics is a bit more temperate. The next time someone in authority announces that America has entered a new era of prosperity, cautions John Kenneth Galbraith, run for cover.
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OPINION
January 4, 2014
Re "Myths to ditch in 2014," Opinion, Dec. 31 In a departure from speaking like one of the insular Republicans who criticize the Democrats in tones guaranteed to meet with closed-mindedness, Jonah Goldberg did both sides a service with this column. He got my attention by confessing that polarization by the right is as deleterious to the legislative process as that of the left. He closed with a plea in 2014 for more tolerance and effort at mutual understanding on both sides. My wish for 2014 is that he become an exemplar of his own advice.
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NEWS
April 19, 1996 | ANTHONY DAY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"In the modern economy . . . production is now more necessary for the employment it provides than for the goods and services it supplies." With this lapidary observation on Page 3 of his new book, John Kenneth Galbraith demonstrates that at 87 he has lost none of the incisive dry wit that has made him a pleasure to read for nearly half a century.
BOOKS
February 13, 2005 | Steve Fraser, Steve Fraser is the author of "Every Man a Speculator: A History of Wall Street in American Life."
John KENNETH GALBRAITH is not merely an extraordinarily well-known economist. Nearly a century old and a prolific author (not only about economics; he has written novels, travelogues and memoirs), Galbraith is the last original Keynesian standing, our best reminder that John Maynard Keynes felt economics had to be about something more than a mathematically elegant description of a free-market world that never was.
NEWS
August 4, 2000 | From Associated Press
President Clinton said Thursday that he will bestow the Medal of Freedom, the nation's highest civilian honor, next week on 15 distinguished Americans, including three senators, an economist, a general, an admiral and the Rev. Jesse Jackson. Clinton announced that he will recognize the individuals at a White House ceremony Wednesday. Established by President Truman as a wartime honor, the medal was reintroduced by President Kennedy as way to honor civilian service.
BOOKS
March 4, 1990 | Timothy Carlson, Carlson, a 1971 graduate of Harvard College, once attended a Galbraith lecture on economics but decided it would be more profitable to read his book rather than take the course. Carlson is a staff writer at TV Guide
A witty novel about a liberal economist and his activist wife who make a splash as corporate raiders with a conscience hardly seems likely to be optioned as the next Oliver Stone project. If the movie "Wall Street" was a heavy-metal take on greed, the novel "A Tenured Professor" is Cole Porter pricking the egos and satirizing the follies of the latest mergers-and-acquisitions gunslingers and envious academics.
BOOKS
October 11, 1987 | Walter Russell Mead, Mead is the author of "Mortal Splendor: The American Empire in Transition" (Houghton Mifflin).
On the third page of his remarkable new book, John Kenneth Galbraith notes that the modern discipline of economics is about two centuries old. "Slightly to my surprise," writes Galbraith, "I realized that I have been professionally present and have known most of the participants for a full one-quarter of that time." With uncharacteristic modesty Galbraith does not add that for many of those years he has been widely regarded as the most original and important living economist.
BOOKS
June 19, 1994 | Robert Sherrill, Robert Sherrill is a free-lance writer
Somehow I feel I'm being conned when I read old men who, looking back over history, give a cheerful appraisal. I trust the cynics. And so, up to a point, I trust John Kenneth Galbraith, who in this account of what he "saw or learned of the central core of economic life" during his 65 years, sets the tone of the book with this observation: "Ignorance, stupidity, in great affairs of state is not something that is commonly cited.
BUSINESS
January 20, 1994 | From Associated Press
When John Kenneth Galbraith expounds on his ideas, he chooses his words carefully, frequently recasting phrases moments after he utters them, as if each sentence were crafted to be a quote for the ages. Here's a sampling: On the lessons learned from the Wall Street crash of 1929 and the merger mania of the 1980s: "There's no necessary association between intelligence and money." On the usefulness of economic predictions: "I do not have a high regard for economic forecasting.
BOOKS
April 28, 1996 | SUSAN SALTER REYNOLDS
THE GOOD SOCIETY: The Human Agenda by John Kenneth Galbraith (Houghton Mifflin: $21.95; 152 pp.). How does John Kenneth Galbraith, one of our greatest economists and humanists of the century, define the "good society"? It is a place wherein "every member, regardless of gender, race or ethnic origin, should have access to a rewarding life."
BOOKS
May 9, 2004 | Howard Marks, Howard Marks is chairman of Oaktree Capital Management in Los Angeles.
In 1970, during my apprenticeship as a securities analyst, I studied office equipment stocks for a bank. One day a portfolio manager asked me for the name of the best Wall Street analyst who tracked Xerox. "The one who most agrees with me is so-and-so," I answered. My point was that the people we think are the smartest usually share our views. When people disagree with us, we tend to write them off as misinformed.
NEWS
August 4, 2000 | From Associated Press
President Clinton said Thursday that he will bestow the Medal of Freedom, the nation's highest civilian honor, next week on 15 distinguished Americans, including three senators, an economist, a general, an admiral and the Rev. Jesse Jackson. Clinton announced that he will recognize the individuals at a White House ceremony Wednesday. Established by President Truman as a wartime honor, the medal was reintroduced by President Kennedy as way to honor civilian service.
OPINION
December 12, 1999 | Elizabeth Mehren, Elizabeth Mehren is New England bureau chief for The Times
The economy is thriving, boasts the president. Never been healthier, agrees Alan Greenspan. Buy, buy, buy, urges Wall Street. But in a grand, wood-paneled salon a mere percentage point from Harvard Yard, the guru of modern economics is a bit more temperate. The next time someone in authority announces that America has entered a new era of prosperity, cautions John Kenneth Galbraith, run for cover.
BOOKS
April 28, 1996 | SUSAN SALTER REYNOLDS
THE GOOD SOCIETY: The Human Agenda by John Kenneth Galbraith (Houghton Mifflin: $21.95; 152 pp.). How does John Kenneth Galbraith, one of our greatest economists and humanists of the century, define the "good society"? It is a place wherein "every member, regardless of gender, race or ethnic origin, should have access to a rewarding life."
NEWS
April 19, 1996 | ANTHONY DAY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"In the modern economy . . . production is now more necessary for the employment it provides than for the goods and services it supplies." With this lapidary observation on Page 3 of his new book, John Kenneth Galbraith demonstrates that at 87 he has lost none of the incisive dry wit that has made him a pleasure to read for nearly half a century.
BOOKS
June 19, 1994 | Robert Sherrill, Robert Sherrill is a free-lance writer
Somehow I feel I'm being conned when I read old men who, looking back over history, give a cheerful appraisal. I trust the cynics. And so, up to a point, I trust John Kenneth Galbraith, who in this account of what he "saw or learned of the central core of economic life" during his 65 years, sets the tone of the book with this observation: "Ignorance, stupidity, in great affairs of state is not something that is commonly cited.
OPINION
January 4, 2014
Re "Myths to ditch in 2014," Opinion, Dec. 31 In a departure from speaking like one of the insular Republicans who criticize the Democrats in tones guaranteed to meet with closed-mindedness, Jonah Goldberg did both sides a service with this column. He got my attention by confessing that polarization by the right is as deleterious to the legislative process as that of the left. He closed with a plea in 2014 for more tolerance and effort at mutual understanding on both sides. My wish for 2014 is that he become an exemplar of his own advice.
BUSINESS
January 20, 1994 | From Associated Press
When John Kenneth Galbraith expounds on his ideas, he chooses his words carefully, frequently recasting phrases moments after he utters them, as if each sentence were crafted to be a quote for the ages. Here's a sampling: On the lessons learned from the Wall Street crash of 1929 and the merger mania of the 1980s: "There's no necessary association between intelligence and money." On the usefulness of economic predictions: "I do not have a high regard for economic forecasting.
BUSINESS
January 20, 1994 | JONATHAN YENKIN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
For decades, John Kenneth Galbraith etched his opinions into the nation's psyche as a prolific writer, as a presidential adviser and, as some colleagues call him, "the most famous professor at Harvard." His liberal views have not always been embraced, especially in the 1980s when the White House sought to shrink the role of government. But now, with Americans fixed on enormous issues such as health care and the economy, there are echoes of the old economist's views in much of the discussion.
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