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John Kleinpeter

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 30, 2001
Re "We Must Study Rail as a Freeway Alternative," Letters, Dec.9: I'm not sure how Art Leahy of the Orange County Transportation Authority defines success when more than $7 billion was spent on light rail in Los Angeles and traffic continues to get worse. Leahy cites a poll that discovered that "70% of the voters in Orange County support construction of a light-rail system," but OCTA's own Web site polls showed light rail in last place when voters were asked to prioritize OCTA's "Power of Ten" transportation projects.
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OPINION
July 13, 2003
Re "CenterLine Funds Stay in Budget," Letters, June 29: I find it interesting that John Kleinpeter believes the residents of Irvine control the transportation destiny of the rest of Orange County. His comments regarding the decision of the Orange County Transportation Authority to keep money in its budget for CenterLine made a rather hypocritical reference to ego. Isn't it much more egotistical to think that an advisory vote by a few Irvine residents should quash CenterLine for everyone?
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 2001
We applaud Orange County Transportation Authority director Todd Spitzer and Chief Executive Arthur Leahy for a wise decision in sidetracking the light rail effort. Let's hope this is not just a strategy, and that OCTA will now have the further wisdom to redirect its attention and resources to continuing the highly productive effort started 10 years ago to restore the adequacy of our roads and freeway system, rather than trying to resurrect the CenterLine. JACK MALLINCKRODT Santa Ana OCTA's recent decision to delay engineering plans for the CenterLine should have been a vote to abandon the wasteful, outdated electric trolley cars destined to destroy the suburban quality of life in any neighborhood they cross.
OPINION
June 29, 2003
Re "CenterLine Funds Stay in Budget," June 10: The decision to keep money for CenterLine in OCTA's budget is one more sign that CenterLine supporters do not understand the meaning of the word "no." The defeat of pro-CenterLine Measure A in Irvine was an enormous blow to the egos of light-rail advocates. CenterLine supporters spent at least $150,000, including $28,000 of public funds for an OCTA mailer, but failed to pass Measure A. CenterLine opponents spent only about $7,000 to defeat Measure A, and succeeded, despite being outspent by more than 20 to 1. Imagine how large the margin of victory would have been if the two bank accounts had been switched.
OPINION
June 29, 2003
Re "CenterLine Funds Stay in Budget," June 10: The decision to keep money for CenterLine in OCTA's budget is one more sign that CenterLine supporters do not understand the meaning of the word "no." The defeat of pro-CenterLine Measure A in Irvine was an enormous blow to the egos of light-rail advocates. CenterLine supporters spent at least $150,000, including $28,000 of public funds for an OCTA mailer, but failed to pass Measure A. CenterLine opponents spent only about $7,000 to defeat Measure A, and succeeded, despite being outspent by more than 20 to 1. Imagine how large the margin of victory would have been if the two bank accounts had been switched.
OPINION
July 13, 2003
Re "CenterLine Funds Stay in Budget," Letters, June 29: I find it interesting that John Kleinpeter believes the residents of Irvine control the transportation destiny of the rest of Orange County. His comments regarding the decision of the Orange County Transportation Authority to keep money in its budget for CenterLine made a rather hypocritical reference to ego. Isn't it much more egotistical to think that an advisory vote by a few Irvine residents should quash CenterLine for everyone?
OPINION
March 2, 2003
Re "Fewer Riders Expected for Rail Project," Feb. 18: This article outlined revised projections for the proposed 11-mile CenterLine light-rail system, showing ridership dropping to 21,800 a day from 42,500 with capital cost increasing to $1.5 billion from $1.1 billion. If CenterLine follows usual patterns, up to three-fourths of its riders will be those who rode buses, with relatively few former drivers. Does it strike anyone else that continuing the CenterLine project in these times under these circumstances is nuts?
NEWS
May 4, 2003
Re "CenterLine Could Be a Fiscal Black Hole, Critics Say," April 12: The cavemen of Orange County are at it again. A group of 21 government leaders asked the Orange County Transportation Authority to cancel the CenterLine project. I have great respect for most of these people and have voted for some of them many times. But we are definitely at odds when it comes to CenterLine. I wonder if they would have said the same thing about building the California Aqueduct. It takes vision and courage to step out and see where our county will and can be in 20 to 30 years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 2001
Re "CenterLine Was Right, So What Went Wrong?" Orange County Voices, March 25: I am appalled at the article written by Sarah L. Catz. She indicates hundreds of meetings and public hearings regarding the light rail. Perhaps residents in parts of Irvine were privy to this, but like most residents in Oak Creek, I was caught off guard. I did a door-to-door a month ago, and not one person knew about the proposed light rail running through Oak Creek. I also read the environmental study the OCTA had commissioned that indicated the visual impact to Oak Creek was minimal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 1999 | Kristiane M. Ridgway, (949) 764-4309
A dissatisfied Planning Commission approved two new neighborhoods for Irvine's Oak Creek village, although not without some criticism for the Irvine Development Co. Commissioner Ken Hansen criticized the "congested" plan for Acacia, a 120-unit condominium project, saying it crammed homes together to "get maximum coverage on 10 acres."
NEWS
May 4, 2003
Re "CenterLine Could Be a Fiscal Black Hole, Critics Say," April 12: The cavemen of Orange County are at it again. A group of 21 government leaders asked the Orange County Transportation Authority to cancel the CenterLine project. I have great respect for most of these people and have voted for some of them many times. But we are definitely at odds when it comes to CenterLine. I wonder if they would have said the same thing about building the California Aqueduct. It takes vision and courage to step out and see where our county will and can be in 20 to 30 years.
OPINION
March 2, 2003
Re "Fewer Riders Expected for Rail Project," Feb. 18: This article outlined revised projections for the proposed 11-mile CenterLine light-rail system, showing ridership dropping to 21,800 a day from 42,500 with capital cost increasing to $1.5 billion from $1.1 billion. If CenterLine follows usual patterns, up to three-fourths of its riders will be those who rode buses, with relatively few former drivers. Does it strike anyone else that continuing the CenterLine project in these times under these circumstances is nuts?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 30, 2001
Re "We Must Study Rail as a Freeway Alternative," Letters, Dec.9: I'm not sure how Art Leahy of the Orange County Transportation Authority defines success when more than $7 billion was spent on light rail in Los Angeles and traffic continues to get worse. Leahy cites a poll that discovered that "70% of the voters in Orange County support construction of a light-rail system," but OCTA's own Web site polls showed light rail in last place when voters were asked to prioritize OCTA's "Power of Ten" transportation projects.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 2001
Re "CenterLine Was Right, So What Went Wrong?" Orange County Voices, March 25: I am appalled at the article written by Sarah L. Catz. She indicates hundreds of meetings and public hearings regarding the light rail. Perhaps residents in parts of Irvine were privy to this, but like most residents in Oak Creek, I was caught off guard. I did a door-to-door a month ago, and not one person knew about the proposed light rail running through Oak Creek. I also read the environmental study the OCTA had commissioned that indicated the visual impact to Oak Creek was minimal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 2001
We applaud Orange County Transportation Authority director Todd Spitzer and Chief Executive Arthur Leahy for a wise decision in sidetracking the light rail effort. Let's hope this is not just a strategy, and that OCTA will now have the further wisdom to redirect its attention and resources to continuing the highly productive effort started 10 years ago to restore the adequacy of our roads and freeway system, rather than trying to resurrect the CenterLine. JACK MALLINCKRODT Santa Ana OCTA's recent decision to delay engineering plans for the CenterLine should have been a vote to abandon the wasteful, outdated electric trolley cars destined to destroy the suburban quality of life in any neighborhood they cross.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 1996
Irvine city planners have smashed a 10-pound project into a 5-pound box ("Roller Hockey Firm May Seek Appeal," Aug. 3). World Roller Hockey at Civic Center Park will include three rinks, three shooting cages, a retail store, an arcade, a McDonald's (described as a "snack bar"), 300 spectator seats and more. City code requires 400 parking spaces for this project and it was approved with only 117. Planning Commissioner Dave Christensen appealed the approval and gave up his opportunity to vote on the project.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 1995 | RUSS LOAR
The Planning Commission approved a low-income housing project this week by a 3-2 vote, but neighbors said they will ask the City Council to overturn the decision. San Francisco-based Bridge Housing Corp. won approval to build 84 low-income apartments in eight buildings on a four-acre lot at Santa Alicia and Santa Clara streets. The company modified a previously rejected plan by incorporating all parking within the project.
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