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John L Hennessy

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April 4, 2000 | KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Electrical engineering professor John L. Hennessy, who recently reeled in the largest gift in Stanford's history, was named the university's next president on Monday. The appointment is expected to perfectly position the campus to harvest big donations from alumni and professors who have joined the fairy-tale rich in the surrounding Silicon Valley. Hennessy, 47, who is currently the university's No.
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NEWS
April 4, 2000 | KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Electrical engineering professor John L. Hennessy, who recently reeled in the largest gift in Stanford's history, was named the university's next president on Monday. The appointment is expected to perfectly position the campus to harvest big donations from alumni and professors who have joined the fairy-tale rich in the surrounding Silicon Valley. Hennessy, 47, who is currently the university's No.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 2013 | By Jason Song
USC President C. L. Max Nikias was the 13th-highest compensated private university president in 2011, making nearly $1.4 million in total pay, while former UC President Mark G. Yudof was the eighth-best paid public education executive, according to an annual survey released Sunday. University of Chicago President Robert J. Zimmer made nearly $3.3 million, ranking him first among private college or university chiefs, according to the Chronicle of Higher Education, while ex-Penn State University President Graham Spanier was the highest paid public president, making $2.9 million during the 2012 fiscal year.
OPINION
March 9, 2008 | Swati Pandey
How much money is too much money to lead the University of California system, with its 10 campuses and 220,000 students? Departing President Robert C. Dynes' compensation is a source of controversy as the Board of Regents picks his successor during a time of rising enrollments and fees and potential budget cuts. See how Dynes' pay compares to other academic leaders at a handful of public and private colleges and universities in California and across the country. Of course, Dynes (along with his counterparts in Michigan and Wisconsin)
BUSINESS
January 13, 2009 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
Stanford University announced Monday it had raised $100 million to create a research center focused on combating global warming and developing cleaner sources of energy. The Precourt Institute for Energy will focus on research related to improving energy efficiency, reducing greenhouse gas emissions, studying national energy policy and developing renewable power sources such as wind, solar and biomass.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 2003 | Rebecca Trounson, Times Staff Writer
Stanford University, one of the nation's wealthiest campuses, says it is anticipating a $25-million budget deficit for next year and has decided to freeze salaries for most of its faculty and staff. The announcement, made in a recent e-mail from Provost John Etchemendy to Stanford's 8,700 employees, follows a decision by the university last fall to impose a hiring freeze for most staff positions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 2011 | By Larry Gordon, Los Angeles Times
Reporting from Palo Alto -- Stanford University's Faculty Senate voted Thursday to invite the Reserve Officer Training Corps back to the campus for the first time since the Vietnam War era, a turnaround prompted by the end of the "don't ask, don't tell" policy against gays serving openly in the military. Stanford's President John L. Hennessy said he would soon start discussions with the military branches to return ROTC to the university, joining other elite schools in welcoming back the officer training units that had been pushed off campus or denied academic standing during the antiwar movement of the 1970s.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 26, 2007 | Richard C. Paddock and Jennifer Delson, Times Staff Writers
Azia Kim arrived at Stanford University last fall from Fullerton and took up residence on campus at Kimball Hall. She ate in the dining hall and seemed to do her homework, often working late into the night on school papers. She told people she was a human biology major and talked about her upcoming exams. There was only one problem: She had not been admitted as a student.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 2006 | Larry Gordon and Rebecca Trounson, Times Staff Writers
What is a university president, dean or other top administrator worth these days? And have colleges gone too far in emulating the lavish perks of corporate America? Those are among the deeper questions triggered by the release this week of an extensive, independent audit of executive compensation at the University of California.
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