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John L Molinaro

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BUSINESS
April 28, 1990 | GREGORY CROUCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first owners of a failed thrift in Southern California to be convicted of bank fraud have tentatively agreed, along with several others, to surrender $5.9 million in assets to settle a civil lawsuit brought by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp., it was learned Friday. The FDIC filed a $30-million lawsuit against former Ramona Savings & Loan owners Donald P. Mangano Sr. and John L. Molinaro to try to recoup money lost after the 1986 collapse of the Orange-based thrift.
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BUSINESS
February 14, 1990 | GREGORY CROUCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first owners of a failed thrift in Southern California to be convicted of bank fraud received severe prison sentences Tuesday in an emotional proceeding in federal court and were ordered to pay millions of dollars in restitution to the government. Donald P. Mangano Sr., 53, of Huntington Beach was sentenced to 15 years in prison and John L. Molinaro, 49, of San Jose was sentenced to 12 years for fraud and conspiracy that led to the 1986 collapse of Ramona Savings & Loan in Santa Ana.
BUSINESS
May 16, 1989
Former S&L Owners' Trial Delayed: U.S. District Judge David V. Kenyon has delayed the criminal trial of the former owners of Orange-based Ramona Savings & Loan until June 13 because of a scheduling conflict. John L. Molinaro and Donald P. Mangano were scheduled to stand trial begining today on more than 30 criminal charges including bank fraud and conspiracy in connection with a Palm Springs real estate deal that regulators say contributed to Ramona's September, 1986, collapse. A spokesperson for the U.S. Attorney's Office said a lengthy civil lawsuit Kenyon is currently hearing forced the postponement.
NEWS
October 5, 1989 | DALLAS M. JACKSON
April 1984: John L. Molinaro and Donald P. Mangano Sr. purchase Ramona Savings & Loan for $4 million. May 1986: Ramona's shaky financial condition and irregular loan activity result in an inspection by regulators. Sept. 1986: Regulators seize Ramona and sue Molinaro, Mangano and others in civil court. July 1987: Molinaro is arrested in San Francisco for passport fraud. He is later convicted. Nov. 1987: A U.S. District judge rules that Molinaro obtained $6.
BUSINESS
October 6, 1989 | GREGORY CROUCH, Times Staff Writer
One day after he was found guilty of bank fraud and conspiracy, a former owner of an Orange thrift was sent to prison Thursday by a federal judge after prosecutors said they were worried he might flee the country given his past conviction for passport fraud. U.S. District Judge David V. Kenyon lifted the $600,000 bail on John L. Molinaro and ordered he be taken to Metropolitan Detention Center in Los Angeles. Molinaro cursed deputy marshals as they handcuffed him and led him away.
BUSINESS
May 3, 1989 | GREGORY CROUCH, Times Staff Writer
John L. Molinaro, the former head of the defunct Ramona Savings & Loan in Orange who has been jailed for nearly 2 years, has been deemed eligible for parole and could be released from prison this week. Molinaro, 48, is being held at Metropolitan Detention Center in Los Angeles on charges including bank fraud and conspiracy in connection with the collapse of Ramona, which was taken over by regulators in September, 1986. The criminal trial based on those charges is scheduled to begin May 16. Last June, U.S. District Judge David V. Kenyon ordered Molinaro be held without bail after prosecutors argued he might flee the country.
BUSINESS
July 19, 1989 | GREGORY CROUCH, Times Staff Writer
Jury selection began Tuesday in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles in the criminal trial of John L. Molinaro and Donald P. Mangano Sr., former owners of Orange-based Ramona Savings & Loan. The two men are the first owners of a Southern California thrift to face criminal prosecution since the national S&L disaster began to unfold in the early 1980s, according to government officials. Molinaro and Mangano each face more than 30 criminal charges, including bank fraud and conspiracy.
BUSINESS
February 14, 1990 | GREGORY CROUCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two Orange County businessmen convicted of causing the collapse of Ramona Savings & Loan in Santa Ana received severe prison sentences Tuesday in federal court in Los Angeles and were ordered to pay millions of dollars in restitution to the government. Donald P. Mangano Sr., 53, of Huntington Beach, was sentenced to 15 years in prison, and John L. Molinaro, 49, of San Jose, received a 12-year sentence on charges of fraud and conspiracy that led to the thrift's 1986 collapse.
BUSINESS
February 6, 1990 | GREGORY CROUCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The sentencing of two Orange County businessmen convicted of diverting millions of dollars from a Santa Ana thrift was delayed Monday after the court was inundated with hundreds of letters from friends, associates and supporters requesting leniency. John L. Molinaro and Donald P. Mangano Sr.--former owners of Ramona Savings & Loan--were scheduled to be sentenced in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles following a conviction in October on more than 30 charges each of bank fraud and conspiracy.
BUSINESS
February 1, 1990 | GREGORY CROUCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The nation's top bank regulator has joined the U.S. attorney's office in Los Angeles in recommending long prison sentences and payment of millions of dollars in restitution and fines for two Orange County men convicted of causing the collapse of a Santa Ana savings and loan. The U.S. attorney's office has recommended that John L. Molinaro and Donald P. Mangano Sr.--former owners of Ramona S&L--receive 55 years in prison between them and pay a total $15 million in fines and restitution.
BUSINESS
October 6, 1989 | GREGORY CROUCH, Times Staff Writer
One day after he was found guilty of bank fraud and conspiracy, a former owner of an Orange thrift was sent to prison Thursday by a federal judge after prosecutors said they were worried he might flee the country given his past conviction for passport fraud. U.S. District Judge David V. Kenyon lifted the $600,000 bail on John L. Molinaro and ordered he be taken to Metropolitan Detention Center in Los Angeles. Molinaro cursed deputy marshals as they handcuffed him and led him away.
BUSINESS
October 5, 1989 | GREGORY CROUCH, Times Staff Writer
In the first criminal trial of owners of a failed savings and loan in Southern California, a federal jury on Wednesday found two men guilty of bank fraud and conspiracy in connection with the 1986 collapse of Ramona Savings & Loan in Orange. "The jury loudly and clearly sent a message that the public will not tolerate looting and stealing of depositors' money by those who own and operate a savings and loan association," said Assistant U.S. Atty. Steven E. Zipperstein, who prosecuted the case.
BUSINESS
February 14, 1990 | GREGORY CROUCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two Orange County businessmen convicted of causing the collapse of Ramona Savings & Loan in Santa Ana received severe prison sentences Tuesday in federal court in Los Angeles and were ordered to pay millions of dollars in restitution to the government. Donald P. Mangano Sr., 53, of Huntington Beach, was sentenced to 15 years in prison, and John L. Molinaro, 49, of San Jose, received a 12-year sentence on charges of fraud and conspiracy that led to the thrift's 1986 collapse.
BUSINESS
September 28, 1989 | GREGORY CROUCH, Times Staff Writer
In the first criminal trial involving owners of a failed Southern California thrift, the prosecution told jurors Wednesday that the former top officials of Ramona Savings & Loan in Orange were engaged in deception and fraud "right from the get-go." "This was a federally insured savings and loan institution. We are not talking about some piggy bank or some toy," Assistant U.S. Atty. Steven E. Zipperstein said during his closing arguments in U.S.
NEWS
October 5, 1989 | GREGORY CROUCH, Times Staff Writer
In the first criminal trial of owners of a failed savings and loan in Southern California, a federal jury on Wednesday found two men guilty of bank fraud and conspiracy in connection with the 1986 collapse of Ramona Savings & Loan in Orange. "The jury loudly and clearly sent a message that the public will not tolerate looting and stealing of depositors' money by those who own and operate a savings and loan association," said Assistant U.S. Atty. Steven E. Zipperstein, who prosecuted the case.
NEWS
October 5, 1989 | DALLAS M. JACKSON
April 1984: John L. Molinaro and Donald P. Mangano Sr. purchase Ramona Savings & Loan for $4 million. May 1986: Ramona's shaky financial condition and irregular loan activity result in an inspection by regulators. Sept. 1986: Regulators seize Ramona and sue Molinaro, Mangano and others in civil court. July 1987: Molinaro is arrested in San Francisco for passport fraud. He is later convicted. Nov. 1987: A U.S. District judge rules that Molinaro obtained $6.
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