Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJohn L Moriarity
IN THE NEWS

John L Moriarity

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
September 6, 1994 | JOHN SCHWADA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An election campaign that's shaping up as one of the most expensive Superior Court judgeship races in state history has mushroomed into a fracas that may give new meaning to the term "judicial temperament." The battle features John L. Moriarity, a Van Nuys-based personal-injury attorney who runs half-page ads in the Yellow Pages and promises to be tough on criminals, and state Assemblyman Terry B.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 6, 1994 | JOHN SCHWADA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An election campaign that's shaping up as one of the most expensive Superior Court judgeship races in state history has mushroomed into a fracas that may give new meaning to the term "judicial temperament." The battle features John L. Moriarity, a Van Nuys-based personal-injury attorney who runs half-page ads in the Yellow Pages and promises to be tough on criminals, and state Assemblyman Terry B.
Advertisement
NEWS
June 9, 1994 | MATHIS CHAZANOV, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a race marked by a last-minute advertising blitz that included an airplane towing a banner over Downtown Los Angeles, Westside Assemblyman Terry B. Friedman finished virtually neck and neck with Van Nuys attorney John L. Moriarity in a countywide judicial election Tuesday. The contest for the Superior Court seat will be decided in a runoff election in November after what is expected to be an expensive and hard-fought campaign.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 1985 | MARK GLADSTONE, Times Staff Writer
John L. Moriarity, a Van Nuys lawyer, is on a list of several people being considered to fill a vacancy on the five-member state Fair Political Practices Commission. The appointment is being made by State Controller Kenneth Cory, who finds himself confronted with an unpleasant political chore. Under a never-before-used section of a decade-old law, Democrat Cory is required to name a Republican to ensure party balance among commissioners.
NEWS
March 3, 1985 | MARK GLADSTONE, Times Staff Writer
Michael Montgomery, a former South Pasadena city councilman, is among several people being considered to fill a vacancy on the five-member state Fair Political Practices Commission. The appointment is to be made by state Controller Kenneth Cory, who finds himself in a political dilemma. Under a section of the law designed to ensure party balance among members of the watchdog commission, Democrat Cory must name a Republican.
NEWS
July 7, 1990 | LANIE JONES and DAVID WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
State health authorities are opening an investigation into the case of an elderly cancer patient who died at FHP Hospital in Fountain Valley because of a nurse's mistaken infusion of the wrong drug, an official said Friday. The Times also learned on Friday that the nurse who allegedly made the medication error, 37-year-old Maureen Daubert, is working at a VA hospital in Lebanon, Pa.
NEWS
June 9, 1994
Key to Election Tables -- An asterisk (*) denotes an incumbent candidate; a double asterisk (**) denotes an appointed incumbent. -- Elected candidates and approved measures are in bold type. Runoff elections may be required in non-partisan races where no candidate receives over 50% of the vote. Results are not official and could be affected by absentee ballots. -- District locations are identified by county.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 1995 | LORENZA MUNOZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Candidates for judicial positions are increasingly investing large sums of their own money on election campaigns, skewing the judiciary toward wealthier individuals who can afford to spend what it takes to win, according to a study of hundreds of Los Angeles County Superior and Municipal Court judicial campaigns.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 1994 | CYNTHIA H. CRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
NO FUN FUNDS: Dialing for dollars is the name of the game in the Capitol political arena these days, with the primary election only days away and campaigns in overdrive. It's possible, in fact, that some members of the Legislature are getting a mild case of cauliflower ear from the constant application of a telephone receiver to the ear. Try to reach a lawmaker these days and often you'll get a staff member explaining that the boss is "across the street" or "out making calls."
Los Angeles Times Articles
|