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John L Robertson

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 1991 | SCOTT HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Department of Defense acknowledged Friday that bones claimed by the Vietnamese government to be remains of Air Force Col. John L. Robertson were "non-human mammal remains." But as he confirmed statements made by Robertson's family, Cmdr. Ned Lundquist, a Pentagon spokesman who specializes in POW-MIA affairs, said military researchers still believe the flier was killed when his F-4C crashed nearly 25 years ago in North Vietnam.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 1992 | JACK CHEEVERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Air Force Col. John Robertson was a classic fighter jock, a handsome, cocky jet pilot who was so happy the day he was ordered to Vietnam that he did cartwheels around his pool. Stationed in Germany in the late 1950s, he won top awards in NATO air reconnaissance competitions. Reassigned to Indochina, he liked to show off by zooming low over the jungle--upside down--while returning from bomb runs over North Vietnam.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 1991 | SCOTT HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Department of Defense acknowledged Friday that a set of bones said by the Vietnamese government to be remains of Air Force Col. John L. Robertson were "non-human mammal remains." But as he confirmed statements made by Robertson's Santa Ana family Friday, Cmdr. Ned Lundquist, a Pentagon spokesman who specializes in POW-MIA affairs, also said military researchers still believe the flier was killed when his F-4C crashed nearly 25 years ago in North Vietnam.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 1991 | DAN WEIKEL
It was a small victory in the POW-MIA saga, but nonetheless significant in a family quest to determine the fate of Lt. Col. John Leighton Robertson, an Air Force fighter pilot shot down over North Vietnam in September, 1966. Two years ago, the government closed Robertson's MIA case under the presumption that he was killed. Last week, amid special U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 1991 | SCOTT HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Given new hope by a photograph they claim proves he is still alive, the family of an American pilot presumed killed during the Vietnam War on Thursday disputed Vietnamese claims that his remains had been returned to U.S. authorities in April, 1990. The daughter of long-missing Air Force Col. John L.
NEWS
July 27, 1991 | DOUGLAS JEHL and KAREN TUMULTY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Bush's top national security deputy scoffed Friday at new photographic material purporting to show U.S. servicemen held captive in Vietnam and said he does not believe any Americans remain prisoners in that country. The unusually blunt statements by National Security Adviser Brent Scowcroft, a retired Air Force lieutenant general, expressed an abiding private skepticism at the highest levels of the Bush Administration about new suggestions that captives may yet be found alive.
NEWS
July 25, 1991 | KAREN TUMULTY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Relatives of three missing Vietnam-era servicemen Wednesday accused the Pentagon of putting out "misinformation" in an effort to discredit their contention that a photograph proves the men are still alive. The families also said that the government had lost fingerprint records that could verify their claims and that they believe the three men are being held as slaves on a potato farm.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 1991 | DAN WEIKEL
It was a small victory in the POW-MIA saga, but nonetheless significant in a family quest to determine the fate of Lt. Col. John Leighton Robertson, an Air Force fighter pilot shot down over North Vietnam in September, 1966. Two years ago, the government closed Robertson's MIA case under the presumption that he was killed. Last week, amid special U.S.
NEWS
July 26, 1991 | KAREN TUMULTY and SCOTT HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Pentagon cast strong new doubts Thursday on the authenticity of evidence indicating that three missing Vietnam-era servicemen are alive, releasing a collection of bizarre documents supposedly written by the servicemen but apparently forged by someone with little knowledge of English. The purported evidence--including a photograph of three men said to be missing Americans--was provided to the Defense Intelligence Agency by a variety of sources, most of whom sought rewards, the Pentagon said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 1992 | JACK CHEEVERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Air Force Col. John Robertson was a classic fighter jock, a handsome, cocky jet pilot who was so happy the day he was ordered to Vietnam that he did cartwheels around his pool. Stationed in Germany in the late 1950s, he won top awards in NATO air reconnaissance competitions. Reassigned to Indochina, he liked to show off by zooming low over the jungle--upside down--while returning from bomb runs over North Vietnam.
NEWS
July 27, 1991 | DOUGLAS JEHL and KAREN TUMULTY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Bush's top national security deputy scoffed Friday at new photographic material purporting to show U.S. servicemen held captive in Vietnam and said he does not believe any Americans remain prisoners in that country. The unusually blunt statements by National Security Adviser Brent Scowcroft, a retired Air Force lieutenant general, expressed an abiding private skepticism at the highest levels of the Bush Administration about new suggestions that captives may yet be found alive.
NEWS
July 26, 1991 | KAREN TUMULTY and SCOTT HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Pentagon cast strong new doubts Thursday on the authenticity of evidence indicating that three missing Vietnam-era servicemen are alive, releasing a collection of bizarre documents supposedly written by the servicemen but apparently forged by someone with little knowledge of English. The purported evidence--including a photograph of three men said to be missing Americans--was provided to the Defense Intelligence Agency by a variety of sources, most of whom sought rewards, the Pentagon said.
NEWS
July 25, 1991 | KAREN TUMULTY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Relatives of three missing Vietnam-era servicemen Wednesday accused the Pentagon of putting out "misinformation" in an effort to discredit their contention that a photograph proves the men are still alive. The families also said that the government had lost fingerprint records that could verify their claims and that they believe the three men are being held as slaves on a potato farm.
NEWS
July 24, 1991 | SCOTT HARRIS and KAREN TUMULTY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
More photographs purporting to show that American servicemen who vanished during the Vietnam War are still alive have surfaced, raising new questions about the government's handling of the emotional POW-MIA issue as Washington prepares for new hearings on the subject. A controversial Orange County-based POW-MIA researcher contends that some photographs he obtained from a Laotian source last year show that an Army Special Forces member who disappeared July 6, 1971, is still alive.
NEWS
July 21, 1991 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It did not take long after the olive drab footlocker was opened for the "Robertson pride" to break down. With the sharp smell of mothballs permeating the air, Shelby Robertson Quast held up a starched Air Force fatigue shirt. "Robertson" was stenciled over one pocket, and the embroidered wings of a command pilot were stitched over the other. The collar tabs bore the gold oak leaf clusters of a major. It looked new.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 1991 | SCOTT HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Department of Defense acknowledged Friday that bones claimed by the Vietnamese government to be remains of Air Force Col. John L. Robertson were "non-human mammal remains." But as he confirmed statements made by Robertson's family, Cmdr. Ned Lundquist, a Pentagon spokesman who specializes in POW-MIA affairs, said military researchers still believe the flier was killed when his F-4C crashed nearly 25 years ago in North Vietnam.
NEWS
July 21, 1991 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It did not take long after the olive drab footlocker was opened for the "Robertson pride" to break down. With the sharp smell of mothballs permeating the air, Shelby Robertson Quast held up a starched Air Force fatigue shirt. "Robertson" was stenciled over one pocket, and the embroidered wings of a command pilot were stitched over the other. The collar tabs bore the gold oak leaf clusters of a major. It looked new.
NEWS
July 24, 1991 | SCOTT HARRIS and KAREN TUMULTY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
More photographs purporting to show that American servicemen who vanished during the Vietnam War are still alive have surfaced, raising new questions about the government's handling of the emotional POW-MIA issue as Washington prepares for new hearings on the subject. A controversial Orange County-based POW-MIA researcher contends that some photographs he obtained from a Laotian source last year show that an Army Special Forces member who disappeared July 6, 1971, is still alive.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 1991 | SCOTT HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Department of Defense acknowledged Friday that a set of bones said by the Vietnamese government to be remains of Air Force Col. John L. Robertson were "non-human mammal remains." But as he confirmed statements made by Robertson's Santa Ana family Friday, Cmdr. Ned Lundquist, a Pentagon spokesman who specializes in POW-MIA affairs, also said military researchers still believe the flier was killed when his F-4C crashed nearly 25 years ago in North Vietnam.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 1991 | SCOTT HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Given new hope by a photograph they claim proves he is still alive, the family of an American pilot presumed killed during the Vietnam War on Thursday disputed Vietnamese claims that his remains had been returned to U.S. authorities in April, 1990. The daughter of long-missing Air Force Col. John L.
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