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John L Sullivan

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SPORTS
July 15, 1989
Earl Gustkey's story about the last bare-knuckle fight in history, between John L. Sullivan and Jake Kilrain, brought back memories. When we were kids playing on the sidewalk outside our house in Medford, Mass., a white-haired man with a cane used to walk slowly along and regularly stop and talk to us. Ten years later, when he died and there were big stories about him in the sports pages of the Boston papers, I was told the old man was Jake Kilrain. Incidentally, there was nothing surprising about Sullivan and Kilrain both hailing from the nearby suburbs of Dorchester and Somerville because Boston was the longtime center of American boxing before the main action shifted to New York in the early '30s.
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SPORTS
April 23, 1992 | EARL GUSTKEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He looks at us through mists of time, from faded, crinkled 19th-Century photographs. It's the jaw that draws you to him. Massive, clean, squared off. The jaw shows that here, plainly, is a man from the warriorclass. And he was. He was Jack Dempsey, decades before anyone ever heard of that other Jack Dempsey, the 1920s heavyweight champion who took his name. The original Jack Dempsey was also known as "the Nonpareil," which means without equal.
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SPORTS
June 18, 1988 | Earl Gustkey
He was a wife-beater, a violent alcoholic, a racist--and the most beloved sports figure of 19th-Century America. John L. Sullivan was also the first American athlete to earn a fortune from sports--about a million dollars during his career--and the first to fumble it all away. When Mike Tyson and Michael Spinks fight June 27 for about $33 million, it has a chance to go down as the richest boxing event of all time.
SPORTS
July 15, 1989
Earl Gustkey's story about the last bare-knuckle fight in history, between John L. Sullivan and Jake Kilrain, brought back memories. When we were kids playing on the sidewalk outside our house in Medford, Mass., a white-haired man with a cane used to walk slowly along and regularly stop and talk to us. Ten years later, when he died and there were big stories about him in the sports pages of the Boston papers, I was told the old man was Jake Kilrain. Incidentally, there was nothing surprising about Sullivan and Kilrain both hailing from the nearby suburbs of Dorchester and Somerville because Boston was the longtime center of American boxing before the main action shifted to New York in the early '30s.
SPORTS
July 8, 1989 | EARL GUSTKEY, Times Staff Writer
One hundred years ago today, in pre-dawn darkness, two trains pulled out of New Orleans in secrecy. They rolled north, across the Pontchartrain Bridge, toward Mississippi. Several thousand men were onboard in such cramped quarters that some clung to the tops of the cars. The passengers' tickets read only: "Destination and Return." The trains rolled through the night. At the Mississippi state line, an armed party of 25 Mississippi state militiamen ordered the first train to stop.
SPORTS
April 23, 1992 | EARL GUSTKEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He looks at us through mists of time, from faded, crinkled 19th-Century photographs. It's the jaw that draws you to him. Massive, clean, squared off. The jaw shows that here, plainly, is a man from the warriorclass. And he was. He was Jack Dempsey, decades before anyone ever heard of that other Jack Dempsey, the 1920s heavyweight champion who took his name. The original Jack Dempsey was also known as "the Nonpareil," which means without equal.
SPORTS
January 23, 1986 | MARK HEISLER, Times Staff Writer
Right from the pages of "The Last Hurrah" come the Sullivans of Boston, who with their bedraggled little football team fight their way to the forefront of society, until the wolf gets inside the door, forcing them to put the family treasure up for sale . . . And then, just as the curtain begins to fall forever, their Patriots, who hadn't won a playoff game in 22 years, win three on the road and gain their first Super Bowl. If this is such a heart-warming story, why is everyone giggling?
NEWS
May 4, 1989
We all grieve the loss of South Pasadena City Councilman Joe Crosby, just as we did when Councilman Bill Osborne died many years ago. At that time, the council had the option of appointing a replacement or having an election. The council wisely decided to have an election. We hope this council will do the same for the following reasons: 1. The remainder of Crosby's four-year term is about three years. If the balance of the term were only a few months or even a year, it would be sensible to make an appointment.
BOOKS
December 28, 1986 | Earl Gustkey
For followers of 20th-Century pugilists such as Joe Louis, Rocky Marciano, Marvin Hagler and Mike Tyson, Miami University Prof. Elliott J. Gorn offers a look at such 19th-Century battlers as James (Deaf) Burke, Abraham Vanderzee, Jack Slack and Sam O'Rourke. He weaves a portrait of early 1800s urban America--to prize fighting's roots in its ethnic communities, to showdowns between neighborhood champions.
NEWS
April 7, 1999 | BOOTH MOORE
Women's History Month may be over, but die-hard historians might want to check out "Extraordinary Women" (Adams Media, 1999), a book that catalogs and describes 365 impressive females (one for every day!) in easy-to-digest, one-page descriptions. While many of the women in the book are famous--Eleanor Roosevelt, Sojourner Truth and Janet Reno, for example--many more were chosen because their accomplishments are often overlooked by history books.
SPORTS
July 8, 1989 | EARL GUSTKEY, Times Staff Writer
One hundred years ago today, in pre-dawn darkness, two trains pulled out of New Orleans in secrecy. They rolled north, across the Pontchartrain Bridge, toward Mississippi. Several thousand men were onboard in such cramped quarters that some clung to the tops of the cars. The passengers' tickets read only: "Destination and Return." The trains rolled through the night. At the Mississippi state line, an armed party of 25 Mississippi state militiamen ordered the first train to stop.
SPORTS
June 18, 1988 | Earl Gustkey
He was a wife-beater, a violent alcoholic, a racist--and the most beloved sports figure of 19th-Century America. John L. Sullivan was also the first American athlete to earn a fortune from sports--about a million dollars during his career--and the first to fumble it all away. When Mike Tyson and Michael Spinks fight June 27 for about $33 million, it has a chance to go down as the richest boxing event of all time.
SPORTS
January 23, 1986 | MARK HEISLER, Times Staff Writer
Right from the pages of "The Last Hurrah" come the Sullivans of Boston, who with their bedraggled little football team fight their way to the forefront of society, until the wolf gets inside the door, forcing them to put the family treasure up for sale . . . And then, just as the curtain begins to fall forever, their Patriots, who hadn't won a playoff game in 22 years, win three on the road and gain their first Super Bowl. If this is such a heart-warming story, why is everyone giggling?
BOOKS
March 16, 1986 | SUE MARTIN
This supernatural mystery centers around Jonathan Corbin, a network executive in New York City, who is afraid to go out in mid-town Manhattan snowstorms. He sees the ghosts of streets and people of a hundred years ago, and they get stronger and stronger, threatening to overwhelm his everyday reality. He's witness to murder, robber baron and boardroom mayhem, and recognizes Teddy Roosevelt and John L. Sullivan swirling about in these visions.
HOME & GARDEN
December 1, 1990 | From From Country Living
The hand-painted or stenciled wooden sleds that delighted children at Christmas a century ago now are appreciated and collected as an art form that can cost thousands of dollars. The commercial production of children's sleds began in the mid-1800s, with most of them made by companies involved in the production of iron-metal goods or in the growing market for toys. The Paris Manufacturing Co., in South Paris, Me., was by far the most prolific sled maker.
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