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John Lahr

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 2006 | Tina Daunt, Times Staff Writer
SHARON STONE? "On any day, any hour, anywhere in the world, Sharon Stone and her private parts can be called up on the World Wide Web with a click of a mouse," observed John Lahr, the celebrity profilist at the magazine credited with inventing the genre, the New Yorker. Woody Allen? "The real Allen holds himself in reserve," Lahr noted in another lengthy piece. "He is, like all great funny men, inconsolable." And what about Sean Penn, the actor most difficult to capture?
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 2012 | By David Ng
One of the most recognizable names in the world of theater criticism is stepping down. John Lahr, the senior theater critic for the New Yorker for close to 20 years, is quitting regular reviewing for the magazine to concentrate on profile writing and book projects.  The New Yorker made the announcement this week on its arts blog, Culture Desk. Lahr joined the magazine in 1992 during the Tina Brown era and has contributed numerous pieces of criticism as well as longer profiles on famous cultural figures including Ingmar Bergman , Woody Allen, Judi Dench and Helen Mirren.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 2012 | By David Ng
One of the most recognizable names in the world of theater criticism is stepping down. John Lahr, the senior theater critic for the New Yorker for close to 20 years, is quitting regular reviewing for the magazine to concentrate on profile writing and book projects.  The New Yorker made the announcement this week on its arts blog, Culture Desk. Lahr joined the magazine in 1992 during the Tina Brown era and has contributed numerous pieces of criticism as well as longer profiles on famous cultural figures including Ingmar Bergman , Woody Allen, Judi Dench and Helen Mirren.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 2006 | Tina Daunt, Times Staff Writer
SHARON STONE? "On any day, any hour, anywhere in the world, Sharon Stone and her private parts can be called up on the World Wide Web with a click of a mouse," observed John Lahr, the celebrity profilist at the magazine credited with inventing the genre, the New Yorker. Woody Allen? "The real Allen holds himself in reserve," Lahr noted in another lengthy piece. "He is, like all great funny men, inconsolable." And what about Sean Penn, the actor most difficult to capture?
ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 1989 | DANIEL CERONE, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Playwright Jo Carson is the winner of the 1989 Kesselring Prize for "Daytrips," which premiered at the Los Angeles Theatre Center on Sunday. The National Arts Club annually presents the $10,000 award--named for actor/author/producer Joseph Kesselring of "Arsenic and Old Lace" fame--to a promising, unknown playwright. Carson was unanimously chosen by the three-judge panel of biographer John Lahr, drama critic Edwin Wilson and playwright Lanford Wilson.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 2007 | Mike Boehm
Sir Ian's coming! Hide the hotel Bible! In a profile by John Lahr in the Aug. 27 edition of the New Yorker, Ian McKellen, who may be occupying a Los Angeles hotel room while he leads the Royal Shakespeare Company in "King Lear" and Chekhov's "The Seagull" at UCLA's Royce Hall, Oct. 19-28, confesses that part of his agenda as an openly gay famous person is ripping the page with Leviticus 20:13 out of the Bible whenever his hotel room comes Scripture-equipped.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 2012 | By David Ng
One of the highest honors in the field of letters, the PEN Literary Awards, were announced Wednesday, and among the honorees are three playwrights. Christopher Durang is receiving the Master American Dramatist award, while Will Eno and Adam Rapp are being honored in the field of mid-career playwrights. This year's drama honors were decided by a panel comprised of producer Robert Brustein, New Yorker critic John Lahr and director Stephen Wadsworth. The awards will be handed out at a ceremony in New York on Oct. 23. (The full name of the drama honors is the PEN/Laura Pels International Foundation Awards.)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 2012 | By David Ng
An intimate, two-hander play by a relatively unknown writer took home the top prize at this year's London Evening Standard Theatre Awards. "Constellations," by Nick Payne, won the prize for best play on Sunday, beating out works by Caryl Churchill and James Graham. "Constellations" ran at the Royal Court Upstairs earlier this year and starred Sally Hawkins and Rafe Spall. The play -- a cryptic, science-themed romance that runs a brief 70 minutes -- received mostly positive reviews.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 2003 | Margy Rochlin, Special to The Times
In her new memoir, "The Memory of All That: Love and Politics in New York, Hollywood and Paris," stage and screen actress Betsy Blair describes her chance meeting at age 16 with Gene Kelly -- then a 28-year-old first-time choreographer -- at Billy Rose's Diamond Horseshoe club in New York City. This encounter, and how it led to Kelly's hiring, then marrying, the naively self-assured New Jersey-born hoofer, isn't new to anyone who's ever skimmed one of Kelly's many biographies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 2005 | Paul Brownfield, Times Staff Writer
Backstage before her first appearance on "The Tonight Show" in 1985, Roseanne Barr read a letter she had written to herself years before, dreaming of this moment. "This is the beginning of your life, for She who is and is not yet," the letter said in part, as recounted in a profile of the comic by the New Yorker's John Lahr. Much has been and will be said about how Johnny Carson "discovered" Roseanne, Ellen DeGeneres, David Letterman, Jerry Seinfeld, Garry Shandling and Robin Williams.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 1994 | RICK VANDERKNYFF
Would comic Bill Hicks--at least the Hicks we knew from club and TV appearances--have wanted to be remembered with a one-hour testimonial? It doesn't quite seem in keeping with his unsentimental style, and perhaps it would have been a better tribute to simply air one of his performances, such as his brilliant HBO "One Night Stand" special.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 1997 | LAURIE WINER, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
After a brief failed run a year before, "Loot" became a London hit in 1966, when Joe Orton was 33 and mastering his art, rivaling Oscar Wilde as the funniest and most dangerous author of epigrams in the English language. One year later, Orton's lover, Kenneth Halliwell, beat his brains in with a hammer. As the critic John Lahr wrote of Orton, "He expected to die young, but he built his plays to last."
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