Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJohn Larroquette
IN THE NEWS

John Larroquette

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 2009
SERIES Glee: As Quinn's secret unravels, the Glee club may not recover in time to compete for sectionals, and Will makes a potentially life-changing decision in this new episode (9 p.m. Fox). MythBusters: Adam and Jamie test an old gun-slinging myth (9 p.m. Discovery). Nostradamus Effect: In the new episode "Armageddon Battle Plan," researchers explore the writings contained in the Dead Sea Scrolls, which detail a future apocalyptic war that will end the world, and claim to find an amazing "coincidence" between events that are unfolding now and those foretold in the War Scroll (9 p.m. History)
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 2012 | By Rebecca Trounson, Los Angeles Times
Reinhold Weege, who created the popular Emmy-winning sitcom "Night Court" about an often-anarchic, after-hours New York courtroom and its cast of memorably loony characters, has died. He was 62. Weege, who also wrote and co-produced the television series "Barney Miller," died Dec. 1 of natural causes at his home in La Jolla, said Bonnie Covelli, his former assistant. "Night Court," which aired on NBC from 1984 to 1992, starred a boyish Harry Anderson as the unorthodox, fun-loving judge Harry Stone and John Larroquette as lecherous prosecuting attorney Dan Fielding.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 1993 | LEE MARGULIES
Four-time Emmy Award winner John Larroquette got off to a dynamite start with his new NBC comedy series last week, finishing No. 2 among all network prime-time programs. According to figures released Tuesday by the A.C. Nielsen Co., "The John Larroquette Show," in which he plays the night manager at a bus station, was seen in about 13.5 million homes, second only to ABC's "Home Improvement."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 2009
SERIES Glee: As Quinn's secret unravels, the Glee club may not recover in time to compete for sectionals, and Will makes a potentially life-changing decision in this new episode (9 p.m. Fox). MythBusters: Adam and Jamie test an old gun-slinging myth (9 p.m. Discovery). Nostradamus Effect: In the new episode "Armageddon Battle Plan," researchers explore the writings contained in the Dead Sea Scrolls, which detail a future apocalyptic war that will end the world, and claim to find an amazing "coincidence" between events that are unfolding now and those foretold in the War Scroll (9 p.m. History)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 1992 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
A Family Affair: Bonnie and John Raitt, daughter and father as well as singing stars of their respective generations, will sing "People Will Say We're in Love" to each other Monday at Theatre L.A.'s Ovation Awards ceremony. Bonnie also will also present one of the awards to her dad at the event at the Doolittle Theatre. John Larroquette will emcee.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 1991 | SHAUNA SNOW, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
On the Mend: Emmy-winning actor John Larroquette, who plays sex-crazed prosecutor Dan Fielding on NBC's "Night Court," was recovering Monday from a Sunday evening dirt bike accident in which he broke his left collarbone, sheriff's deputies said. Larroquette, 43, was taken to St. John's Hospital in Santa Monica after losing control in a field near his Malibu home.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 2012 | By Rebecca Trounson, Los Angeles Times
Reinhold Weege, who created the popular Emmy-winning sitcom "Night Court" about an often-anarchic, after-hours New York courtroom and its cast of memorably loony characters, has died. He was 62. Weege, who also wrote and co-produced the television series "Barney Miller," died Dec. 1 of natural causes at his home in La Jolla, said Bonnie Covelli, his former assistant. "Night Court," which aired on NBC from 1984 to 1992, starred a boyish Harry Anderson as the unorthodox, fun-loving judge Harry Stone and John Larroquette as lecherous prosecuting attorney Dan Fielding.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 2009 | From a Times Staff Writer
Ashley Brown and Gavin Lee, who starred in the original 2006 Broadway production of "Mary Poppins," will reprise their roles in the touring version that opens at the Ahmanson Theatre in downtown L.A. next month. Brown will play Poppins, the flying nanny, and Gavin will portray Bert, the chimney sweep -- a role he also played in London. Meanwhile, in other stage casting news, Christopher Lloyd and John Larroquette have been set to star in "Dr. Seuss' How the Grinch Stole Christmas!
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 1991 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Man/Woman of the Year: Actor Scott Bakula has played both men and women on NBC's creative "Quantum Leap" series, so tonight the Hollywood Radio and Television Society is naming him the international man/woman of the year in broadcasting. He'll pick up the honor at the group's annual International Broadcasting Awards dinner at the Beverly Hilton, where the society also will name the world's best radio and television commercials. John Larroquette of "Night Court" will be the emcee.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 2009 | From a Times Staff Writer
Ashley Brown and Gavin Lee, who starred in the original 2006 Broadway production of "Mary Poppins," will reprise their roles in the touring version that opens at the Ahmanson Theatre in downtown L.A. next month. Brown will play Poppins, the flying nanny, and Gavin will portray Bert, the chimney sweep -- a role he also played in London. Meanwhile, in other stage casting news, Christopher Lloyd and John Larroquette have been set to star in "Dr. Seuss' How the Grinch Stole Christmas!
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 1996 | STEVE WEINSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's tough enough to get a TV show you created on the air. But then to be forced to watch two of your series go mano a mano in the cutthroat lions' den of Nielsen numbers is a predicament worthy of Job. Except that the pay is a lot better. "It's a really difficult, bizarre phenomenon," said Don Reo, who, beginning Wednesday, will watch two of his offspring--NBC's "The John Larroquette Show" and CBS' "Pearl"--square off against each other every Wednesday at 8:30 p.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 1996 | STEVE WEINSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
This is how devoted the makers of "The John Larroquette Show" are to being quirkily literary and sneakily true to their rather black comic vision: When NBC requested that this sitcom about an alcoholic struggling with sobriety dispense with any talk about alcoholism as a condition for renewal, they acquiesced. But they also hired an elephant. So far this season, without any explanation, the huge mammal has popped up in the background of the majority of the show's episodes.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 1993 | ANTHONY and DENISE JI-AHNTE SIBERT, Anthony and Denise Ji-Ahnte Sibert write on African-American affairs and reside in Riverside. and
Howard Rosenberg's glowing review of "The John Larroquette Show" (" 'John Larroquette Show' on Right Track to Laughs," Calendar, Sept. 2), where he found it ". . . has the potential to be prime time's next great comedy series . . ." and ". . . is probably closest to the late, great 'Taxi' in the way it integrates interestingly written characters into soulful comedy . . . ," was a bit premature. Why? Well, the episode on Sept.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 1993 | LEE MARGULIES
Four-time Emmy Award winner John Larroquette got off to a dynamite start with his new NBC comedy series last week, finishing No. 2 among all network prime-time programs. According to figures released Tuesday by the A.C. Nielsen Co., "The John Larroquette Show," in which he plays the night manager at a bus station, was seen in about 13.5 million homes, second only to ABC's "Home Improvement."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 1993 | HOWARD ROSENBERG, TIMES TELEVISION CRITIC
"The John Larroquette Show" has the potential to be prime time's next great comedy series, one whose bluesy humor springs like a gusher from the pathos of contemporary urban life. It arrives at 9:30 tonight on NBC (Channels 4, 36 and 39), before moving to its regular 9 p.m. Tuesday slot. As a newly recovering alcoholic trying to repair himself as night manager at a wreck of a bus depot in a dismal section of St.
NEWS
October 13, 1985
I can't understand how all those actors and actresses have the incredible nerve to participate in the Emmy Awards. "Night Court" is good for a laugh, but how is John Larroquette's performance worthy of an accolade for best supporting actor in a comedy? The show is nonclassic vaudeville, or burlesque at best. The awards are the equivalent of junk-food manufacturers getting together and handing out awards for best "cream filled" or "most outstanding shelf life," etc. I like to think Larroquette has not peaked with "Night Court."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 1990 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON
In "Madhouse" (playing citywide), writer-director Tom Ropelewski takes a nifty idea--a young couple attacked by hordes of maddening house guests--and wears out his own welcome with it. John Larroquette and Kirstie Alley are the film's Mark and Jessie Bannister, a yuppie couple whose money, home and high-profile jobs (he's a financial adviser, she's a TV reporter) contrast with the alleged low-lifes who move in with them. The Bannisters' tale is done in bright colors, at a savage screaming pitch.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 1993 | DANIEL CERONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John Larroquette, dressed in work boots, faded jeans and a denim shirt, draped his long body against a ticket counter, flipping his head sideways from time to time to keep his dark, tangled hair from falling in his face. The former scene stealer from "Night Court," who won four consecutive Emmys playing adolescent assistant Dist. Atty.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 1992 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
A Family Affair: Bonnie and John Raitt, daughter and father as well as singing stars of their respective generations, will sing "People Will Say We're in Love" to each other Monday at Theatre L.A.'s Ovation Awards ceremony. Bonnie also will also present one of the awards to her dad at the event at the Doolittle Theatre. John Larroquette will emcee.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|