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John Lasseter

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NEWS
June 21, 2011 | Rebecca Keegan, Los Angeles Times
"Honnnnnk! Honnnnnk!" John Lasseter had explicit instructions about how the Galloping Goose, an antique steam train character in "Cars 2," should look and sound, and he was delivering them with brio. It was January and the animation czar was making the hourlong commute from his home in Sonoma County to his Pixar office here on the outskirts of Oakland in the passenger seat of a town car. On his lap, he balanced an iPad loaded with shots to review while he recorded voice memos for the movie's crew: "Like a diesel horn.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2014 | By Oliver Gettell
A decade after the titular superhero family of "The Incredibles" donned their spandex suits to save the day, Disney announced that its animation studio Pixar is working on a sequel to the Oscar-winning movie. The sequel was announced by Disney Chairman and Chief Executive Robert Iger during the company's annual shareholder meeting in Portland, Ore. Iger also revealed that Pixar is planning a third movie in the popular "Cars" franchise. Written and directed by Brad Bird, "The Incredibles" tells of a superpowered-family living in a world where superheroes have been banned from fighting crime.
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BUSINESS
December 3, 1999 | CLAUDIA ELLER and JAMES BATES
Who's the hottest director in the movie business today with a so-far flawless track record? Not Steven Spielberg. It's John Lasseter, the unpretentious 42-year-old animation whiz who directed the huge hit "Toy Story 2," just released by Walt Disney Co. With three blockbusters in three tries, Lasseter is in the unheard-of position of batting 1,000 in the movie business. Despite his success, Lasseter is relatively invisible in Hollywood.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 2013 | By Susan King
On Oct. 16, 1923, Walt Disney and his brother Roy began the Walt Disney Co. inauspiciously in the rear of a small office at the Holly-Vermont Realty in Los Angeles. It was there that the young brothers, who paid $10 a month for the modest space, began producing their live action/animated series of shorts known as the "Alice Comedies. " Ninety years later, Walt Disney Animation Studios is a slightly larger and more lucrative operation. Its 53rd animated feature, "Frozen," just knocked "The Hunger Games: Catching Fire" off its box office pedestal and has brought in more than $134 million domestically since its opening on Nov. 22. And the new animated short that plays in theaters with "Frozen," called "Get a Horse!
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 2011 | Rebecca Keegan
"Honnnnnk! Honnnnnk!" John Lasseter had explicit instructions about how the Galloping Goose, an antique steam train character in "Cars 2," should look and sound, and he was delivering them with brio. It was January and the animation czar was making the hourlong commute from his home in Sonoma County to his Pixar office here on the outskirts of Oakland in the passenger seat of a town car. On his lap, he balanced an iPad loaded with shots to review while he recorded voice memos for the movie's crew: "Like a diesel horn.
BUSINESS
December 14, 2009 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski
Disney Pixar Animation guru John Lasseter found himself tangled in a miniature fashion kerfuffle. Toy maker Mattel Inc. had made a prototype doll of "The Princess and the Frog's" newly minted princess, Tiana, wearing her bayou wedding dress. But one animator worried that the gown failed to reflect the one in the film, whose multiple layers resemble the petals of an unfolding waterlily. Lasseter suggested a way to create the illusion of volume without driving up the doll's $10 price tag -- namely, printing a swirling pattern of glitter atop the diaphanous outer layer of fabric.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 2013 | By Amy Kaufman
“Finding Dory” may be undergoing a sea change as Pixar is taking a page from a little-seen whale documentary. The Walt Disney-owned animation studio is hard at work on "Finding Dory," a follow-up to the 2003 oceanic blockbuster "Finding Nemo. " But this spring, after Pixar executives viewed "Blackfish," which raises sharp questions about the health of whales in captivity, the studio decided to make substantial changes to the "Dory" script. According to Louie Psihoyos, who directed the Oscar-winning dolphin slaughter documentary “The Cove,” Pixar chief creative officer John Lasseter and “Dory” director Andrew Stanton sat down with “Blackfish” director Gabriela Cowperthwaite in April after seeing her movie.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 2006 | John Horn, Times Staff Writer
IF Mattel thought that its "Cars" Hot Wheels line was good enough, John Lasseter, the animated film's director, had a different message for the toy line's designers: At Pixar Animation Studios, good enough doesn't quite cut it.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 2011 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
It's Pixar Animation's 25th anniversary, and the studio has kicked back and given a present to itself and its ever-expanding audience with the genially entertaining "Cars 2. " A movie that loves autos and doesn't care who knows it, "Cars 2" is so close to the heart of John Lasseter that he carved out time from being the creative czar of both Pixar and Disney animation to direct it himself, the first time Lasseter's done that since, well, the original...
ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 2006
Animator honored: John Lasseter ("Toy Story," "Cars") will receive the 2006 lifetime achievement award from the Loyola Marymount University School of Film and Television during the school's Outside the Frame Festival on Oct. 9. Lasseter oversees animated films at Pixar and Disney Animation Studios.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 2013 | By Amy Kaufman
“Finding Dory” may be undergoing a sea change as Pixar is taking a page from a little-seen whale documentary. The Walt Disney-owned animation studio is hard at work on "Finding Dory," a follow-up to the 2003 oceanic blockbuster "Finding Nemo. " But this spring, after Pixar executives viewed "Blackfish," which raises sharp questions about the health of whales in captivity, the studio decided to make substantial changes to the "Dory" script. According to Louie Psihoyos, who directed the Oscar-winning dolphin slaughter documentary “The Cove,” Pixar chief creative officer John Lasseter and “Dory” director Andrew Stanton sat down with “Blackfish” director Gabriela Cowperthwaite in April after seeing her movie.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 2013 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Remember the days when Pixar meant perfection? When you could count on its animation to amaze, its stories to sweep you up? Remember "Up"? Or the smooth ride in "Cars"? The "Toy Story" pals whose friendship was anything but plastic? The love among the ruins unearthed by "Wall-E"? A clownfish dad's deep-sea desperation in "Finding Nemo"? PHOTOS: Disney without Pixar What has happened to the memory makers who gave us all that? They are nowhere to be found at "Monsters University," the latest shiny new movie to roll off what increasingly feels like the Disney-Pixar assembly line.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik
It wasn't that long ago when Disney was struggling to revive a moribund animation division while its powerhouse subsidiary Pixar was on a serious roll. Things look a little different these days. “Cars 2” and “Brave,” both released under the Pixar name, were just decently received and not considered the home runs that their predecessors were. “Monsters University,” a sequel out this month, is shaping up as a movie with some similarly mixed reactions. Meanwhile, Disney's own animation division - admittedly with the help of John Lasseter and Pixar brass - is coming off a major hit with last fall's “Wreck-It Ralph.” The company will look to repeat the feat this year with the 3-D “Frozen” a movie co-directed by the writer of 'Wreck-It Ralph,” Jennifer Lee. The Disney film reimagines Hans Christian Andersen's “The Snow Queen” as an animated tale about a girl (voiced by Kristen Bell)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 2013 | By Ben Fritz
Long stuck in low gear, Walt Disney Co.'s video game division is aiming for infinity. The entertainment conglomerate on Tuesday unveiled plans for a high-stakes initiative called Disney Infinity that could determine the success or failure of its video game business over the next few years. Infinity will enable players to buy toys based on famous Disney characters like Mr. Incredible and "Pirates of the Caribbean's" Jack Sparrow and “scan” them into a game. Each character can have adventures in his or her own environment - like Sparrow on the high seas -- or together in a "playground" mode where players create new worlds.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 2013 | By Ben Fritz
Following weak box office performances for re-releases of "Monsters, Inc.," "Finding Nemo" and "Beauty and the Beast" in 3-D, Walt Disney Studios has canceled plans for   a 3-D "The Little Mermaid" in September. The underwater animated hit from 1989 was the fourth and final 3-D re-release for which Disney announced plans in late 2011 after "The Lion King" proved a surprise hit in the format, grossing nearly $100 million in the U.S. and Canada. But "The Lion King" turned out to be an anomaly, as the three follow-ups grossed far less.
BUSINESS
December 17, 2012 | By Ben Fritz, Los Angeles Times
Hollywood isn't seeing as much green in 3-D re-releases as it had hoped. Considered an easy new revenue source after the 3-D re-release of Walt Disney Studios' "The Lion King" popped out of the screen and grossed nearly $100 million last year, most such follow-ups have landed with a thud in 2012. Disney's "Beauty and the Beast" and "Finding Nemo" were both disappointments, grossing $47.6 million and $40.7 million, respectively, in the U.S. and Canada. Twentieth Century Fox and Lucasfilm's "Star Wars: The Phantom Menace" took in a similarly unimpressive $43.5 million in February.
BUSINESS
February 12, 2006
Regarding "Pixar's Creative Chief to Have Special Power at Disney: Greenlighting Movies," Jan. 27: Why didn't Walt Disney Co. Chief Executive Bob Iger just steal John Lasseter away from Pixar Animation Studios and set him up in his own shop? I guarantee it would have cost the shareholders far less than $7 billion. Jon Crowley Sherman Oaks
ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 2013 | By Ben Fritz
Long stuck in low gear, Walt Disney Co.'s video game division is aiming for infinity. The entertainment conglomerate on Tuesday unveiled plans for a high-stakes initiative called Disney Infinity that could determine the success or failure of its video game business over the next few years. Infinity will enable players to buy toys based on famous Disney characters like Mr. Incredible and "Pirates of the Caribbean's" Jack Sparrow and “scan” them into a game. Each character can have adventures in his or her own environment - like Sparrow on the high seas -- or together in a "playground" mode where players create new worlds.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 2011 | By Charles Solomon, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Walt Disney famously said, "I only hope that we never lose sight of one thing — that it was all started by a mouse. " For the Pixar artists, it was all started by a lamp. Twenty-five years ago (Aug. 17, 1986), "Luxo, Jr.," a short depicting the misadventures of a rambunctious little desk lamp and his weary father, premiered in Dallas and did something no computer-animated film had done before: It made audiences laugh. The first film from Steve Jobs' newly formed company Pixar and the second from director John Lasseter, "Luxo" launched the most successful and innovative animation studio since Walt Disney's heyday in the 1930s.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 2011 | By Patrick Kevin Day and Rebecca Keegan, Los Angeles Times
Pixar, arguably Hollywood's most admired movie studio, has made its first lemon as far as the critics are concerned. "Cars 2," director John Lasseter's sequel to his 2006 ode to gearheads, has collected the worst reviews of any of the 12 films in the animation studio's 25-year-history. "It actually hurts to knock one of [Pixar's] movies — something I've never done before," wrote Indiewire critic Leonard Maltin. "But then, I've never gotten a headache watching any of their previous films.
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