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John Lasseter

ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 2009 | By Susan King
The Disney animation team of Ron Clements and John Musker wrote and directed the 1989 blockbuster musical fairy tale "The Little Mermaid," and followed that up with 1992's "Aladdin" and 1997's "Hercules." Seven years after their last Disney film, 2002's "Treasure Planet," the two are back with the new musical fairy tale, "The Princess and the Frog," set in New Orleans in the 1920s and featuring the studio's first animated African American heroine. Randy Newman supplies the lovely ballads and swinging ragtime jazz score.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2014 | By Oliver Gettell
A decade after the titular superhero family of "The Incredibles" donned their spandex suits to save the day, Disney announced that its animation studio Pixar is working on a sequel to the Oscar-winning movie. The sequel was announced by Disney Chairman and Chief Executive Robert Iger during the company's annual shareholder meeting in Portland, Ore. Iger also revealed that Pixar is planning a third movie in the popular "Cars" franchise. Written and directed by Brad Bird, "The Incredibles" tells of a superpowered-family living in a world where superheroes have been banned from fighting crime.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 2006 | John Horn
JOHN LASSETER holds the keys to the kingdom. He really does. As part of the Disney-Pixar deal, the "Cars" director and Pixar executive vice president now has creative control not only over Disney's feature animation division but also its theme parks. Having worked on Disneyland's Jungle Cruise ride as a young man, the Magic Kingdom is familiar territory to Lasseter. Still, changes at the theme parks may take months to spot.
NEWS
December 9, 2009
With its critically acclaimed new release "The Princess and the Frog," Disney returns to its hand-drawn animation heyday. The man making that push? The same guy who helped usher in the computer animation takeover with the 1995 blockbuster "Toy Story." John Lasseter, the guiding force at Pixar Animation Studios, admits he was dismayed when Disney and DreamWorks and other studios decided to close up their 2-D hand-drawn divisions earlier this decade after several such films performed poorly.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 2011 | By Patrick Kevin Day and Rebecca Keegan, Los Angeles Times
Pixar, arguably Hollywood's most admired movie studio, has made its first lemon as far as the critics are concerned. "Cars 2," director John Lasseter's sequel to his 2006 ode to gearheads, has collected the worst reviews of any of the 12 films in the animation studio's 25-year-history. "It actually hurts to knock one of [Pixar's] movies — something I've never done before," wrote Indiewire critic Leonard Maltin. "But then, I've never gotten a headache watching any of their previous films.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 2010 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Movie Critic
If Pixar is the only sure thing in movies today — and it is — then the "Toy Story" franchise is its most reliable component. So while it's not exactly a surprise to say that "Toy Story 3" is everything you hoped it would be, it is something of a relief. For as survivors of say " The Godfather, Part III" remember, the third time can be the death knell for a much admired series. "Toy Story 3" has prospered where others have faltered because it has simultaneously stayed true to its roots and expanded its reach.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 2013 | By Susan King
On Oct. 16, 1923, Walt Disney and his brother Roy began the Walt Disney Co. inauspiciously in the rear of a small office at the Holly-Vermont Realty in Los Angeles. It was there that the young brothers, who paid $10 a month for the modest space, began producing their live action/animated series of shorts known as the "Alice Comedies. " Ninety years later, Walt Disney Animation Studios is a slightly larger and more lucrative operation. Its 53rd animated feature, "Frozen," just knocked "The Hunger Games: Catching Fire" off its box office pedestal and has brought in more than $134 million domestically since its opening on Nov. 22. And the new animated short that plays in theaters with "Frozen," called "Get a Horse!
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 2006 | Kenneth Turan, Times Staff Writer
GIVEN that Americans love automobiles and animated films, it's no shock that a feature-length cartoon called "Cars" turned out so well. The source of this supremely engaging film's curb appeal, however, is a most pleasant surprise. For in the years since Pixar guru John Lasseter last directed a film ("Toy Story 2" in 1999), the trend in the field has been to go the wiseguy route.
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