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John Lasseter

ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 1989 | CHARLES SOLOMON
"Knickknack," the latest film from Pixar's award-winning computer animation team of John Lasseter, William Reeves and Eben Ostby, made its belated debut in "The Second Animation Celebration: The Movie!" earlier this week at selected theaters. It was worth waiting for: "Knickknack" is even better than "Luxo Jr." and the Oscar-winning "Tin Toy." The film centers on the little snowman inside one of those tacky souvenir paperweights filled with plastic snow.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 2011 | By Charles Solomon, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Walt Disney famously said, "I only hope that we never lose sight of one thing — that it was all started by a mouse. " For the Pixar artists, it was all started by a lamp. Twenty-five years ago (Aug. 17, 1986), "Luxo, Jr.," a short depicting the misadventures of a rambunctious little desk lamp and his weary father, premiered in Dallas and did something no computer-animated film had done before: It made audiences laugh. The first film from Steve Jobs' newly formed company Pixar and the second from director John Lasseter, "Luxo" launched the most successful and innovative animation studio since Walt Disney's heyday in the 1930s.
NEWS
December 9, 2009
With its critically acclaimed new release "The Princess and the Frog," Disney returns to its hand-drawn animation heyday. The man making that push? The same guy who helped usher in the computer animation takeover with the 1995 blockbuster "Toy Story." John Lasseter, the guiding force at Pixar Animation Studios, admits he was dismayed when Disney and DreamWorks and other studios decided to close up their 2-D hand-drawn divisions earlier this decade after several such films performed poorly.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2014 | By Oliver Gettell
A decade after the titular superhero family of "The Incredibles" donned their spandex suits to save the day, Disney announced that its animation studio Pixar is working on a sequel to the Oscar-winning movie. The sequel was announced by Disney Chairman and Chief Executive Robert Iger during the company's annual shareholder meeting in Portland, Ore. Iger also revealed that Pixar is planning a third movie in the popular "Cars" franchise. Written and directed by Brad Bird, "The Incredibles" tells of a superpowered-family living in a world where superheroes have been banned from fighting crime.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 2009 | By Susan King
The Disney animation team of Ron Clements and John Musker wrote and directed the 1989 blockbuster musical fairy tale "The Little Mermaid," and followed that up with 1992's "Aladdin" and 1997's "Hercules." Seven years after their last Disney film, 2002's "Treasure Planet," the two are back with the new musical fairy tale, "The Princess and the Frog," set in New Orleans in the 1920s and featuring the studio's first animated African American heroine. Randy Newman supplies the lovely ballads and swinging ragtime jazz score.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik
It wasn't that long ago when Disney was struggling to revive a moribund animation division while its powerhouse subsidiary Pixar was on a serious roll. Things look a little different these days. “Cars 2” and “Brave,” both released under the Pixar name, were just decently received and not considered the home runs that their predecessors were. “Monsters University,” a sequel out this month, is shaping up as a movie with some similarly mixed reactions. Meanwhile, Disney's own animation division - admittedly with the help of John Lasseter and Pixar brass - is coming off a major hit with last fall's “Wreck-It Ralph.” The company will look to repeat the feat this year with the 3-D “Frozen” a movie co-directed by the writer of 'Wreck-It Ralph,” Jennifer Lee. The Disney film reimagines Hans Christian Andersen's “The Snow Queen” as an animated tale about a girl (voiced by Kristen Bell)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 2013 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Remember the days when Pixar meant perfection? When you could count on its animation to amaze, its stories to sweep you up? Remember "Up"? Or the smooth ride in "Cars"? The "Toy Story" pals whose friendship was anything but plastic? The love among the ruins unearthed by "Wall-E"? A clownfish dad's deep-sea desperation in "Finding Nemo"? PHOTOS: Disney without Pixar What has happened to the memory makers who gave us all that? They are nowhere to be found at "Monsters University," the latest shiny new movie to roll off what increasingly feels like the Disney-Pixar assembly line.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 2010 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Lee Unkrich was excited four years ago when John Lasseter, director and chief creative officer of Pixar and Walt Disney Animation Studios, tapped him to direct "Toy Story 3." Then, in the next breath, Unkrich realized the massive responsibility he had been given. "I was very worried at the beginning of the film when John asked me to direct it," says the soft-spoken Unkrich over lunch at Walt Disney Studios in Burbank. "We wanted to make another 'Toy Story' for a long time, but it was a huge amount of pressure for a lot of reasons.
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