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John Lasseter

ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2007 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
JOHN LASSETER and Randy Newman both grew up in Southern California, but they couldn't possibly come from more different worlds. Lasseter is from Whittier, son of the parts manager at a Chevy dealership. Newman grew up on the Westside of Los Angeles, where he spent much of his boyhood on Hollywood sound stages, watching his uncles Alfred, Lionel and Emil Newman conduct studio orchestras.
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NEWS
November 7, 2007 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
JOHN LASSETER is in a classic no-win position. The chief creative officer at both Pixar and the Disney animation group is one of the most influential filmmakers of our era, both as a director (most recently of "Cars") and as the guiding force behind Pixar's unprecedented string of creative and commercial triumphs. (Pixar's latest success, "Ratatouille," made its DVD debut this week).
NEWS
September 22, 2009 | Claudia Eller and Dawn C. Chmielewski
Walt Disney Co. Chief Executive Bob Iger must act quickly to replace studio head Dick Cook to avoid further destabilizing the Burbank-based movie operation. Cook's abrupt departure Friday is upsetting employees, many of whom are finding it difficult to focus on work because they are anxious about their future. In addition, stars and filmmakers do not like to face uncertainty and want assurances that their projects will remain on track. Iger is not tipping his hand about whom he will name to fill the job. One executive that's a subject of speculation is Disney Channel President Rich Ross.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2010 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski and Claudia Eller, Los Angeles Times
Once upon a time, there was a studio in Burbank that spun classic fairy tales into silver-screen gold. But now the curtain is falling on "princess movies," which have been a part of Disney Animation's heritage since the 1937 debut of its first feature film, "Snow White. " The studio's Wednesday release of "Tangled," a contemporary retelling of the Rapunzel story, will be the last fairy tale produced by Disney's animation group for the foreseeable future. "Films and genres do run a course," said Pixar Animation Studios chief Ed Catmull, who along with director John Lasseter oversees Disney Animation.
BUSINESS
June 21, 2011 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski and Rebecca Keegan, Los Angeles Times
When it comes to sequels, "Cars 2" flies in the face of conventional Hollywood calculus. Its predecessor was the least well-reviewed of Pixar Animation Studios' 11 movies and among its poorest performers at the box office — at least, by the premier animation studio's sterling standards. One attribute distinguishes "Cars" from most other films: it sparked a licensing bonanza that continued to fuel merchandise sales long after Lightning McQueen, Mater and the movie's other anthropomorphic autos rolled out of the megaplex.
NEWS
January 5, 2013 | By Brady MacDonald, Los Angeles Times staff writer
I've been trying in vain for the better part of a decade to get my family to take a road trip along Route 66. Nothing worked until my wife and daughter stepped onto the fake Route 66 in Cars Land at Disney California Adventure - and suddenly their interest piqued in the Mother Road. Photos: The real Route 66 inspirations for Disney's Cars Land In an attempt to close the deal on my dream vacation, I decided to search for the real-world inspirations behind the fictional town of Radiator Springs.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 2013 | By Rebecca Keegan
In the 1937 promotional film "How Walt Disney Cartoons Are Made," an announcer describes some of the intricate work going into the studio's first feature-length film, "Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs," in a department called Inking and Painting. "Here, hundreds of pretty girls in a comfortable building all their own, well-lighted, air-conditioned throughout, cover the drawings with sheets of transparent celluloid," the announcer says, over images of white-gloved young women preparing male animators' drawings for the screen.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 2009 | Charles Burress
Once the standing ovation died down, anticipation among the 6,500 people packed into a Comic-Con convention hall in San Diego was almost electric as they waited for the first words from the silver-haired alchemist of animation, Hayao Miyazaki. To the opening question from Pixar leading light John Lasseter about how he develops his stories, the white-jacketed, 68-year-old director replied, "My process is thinking, thinking and thinking -- thinking about my stories for a long time."
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