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John Lasseter

NEWS
September 22, 2009 | Claudia Eller and Dawn C. Chmielewski
Walt Disney Co. Chief Executive Bob Iger must act quickly to replace studio head Dick Cook to avoid further destabilizing the Burbank-based movie operation. Cook's abrupt departure Friday is upsetting employees, many of whom are finding it difficult to focus on work because they are anxious about their future. In addition, stars and filmmakers do not like to face uncertainty and want assurances that their projects will remain on track. Iger is not tipping his hand about whom he will name to fill the job. One executive that's a subject of speculation is Disney Channel President Rich Ross.
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NEWS
January 5, 2013 | By Brady MacDonald, Los Angeles Times staff writer
I've been trying in vain for the better part of a decade to get my family to take a road trip along Route 66. Nothing worked until my wife and daughter stepped onto the fake Route 66 in Cars Land at Disney California Adventure - and suddenly their interest piqued in the Mother Road. Photos: The real Route 66 inspirations for Disney's Cars Land In an attempt to close the deal on my dream vacation, I decided to search for the real-world inspirations behind the fictional town of Radiator Springs.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2010 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski and Claudia Eller, Los Angeles Times
Once upon a time, there was a studio in Burbank that spun classic fairy tales into silver-screen gold. But now the curtain is falling on "princess movies," which have been a part of Disney Animation's heritage since the 1937 debut of its first feature film, "Snow White. " The studio's Wednesday release of "Tangled," a contemporary retelling of the Rapunzel story, will be the last fairy tale produced by Disney's animation group for the foreseeable future. "Films and genres do run a course," said Pixar Animation Studios chief Ed Catmull, who along with director John Lasseter oversees Disney Animation.
BUSINESS
June 21, 2011 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski and Rebecca Keegan, Los Angeles Times
When it comes to sequels, "Cars 2" flies in the face of conventional Hollywood calculus. Its predecessor was the least well-reviewed of Pixar Animation Studios' 11 movies and among its poorest performers at the box office — at least, by the premier animation studio's sterling standards. One attribute distinguishes "Cars" from most other films: it sparked a licensing bonanza that continued to fuel merchandise sales long after Lightning McQueen, Mater and the movie's other anthropomorphic autos rolled out of the megaplex.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 2002
Movies "Toy Story" (1995) "A Bug's Life" (1998) "Toy Story 2" (1999) "Monsters, Inc." (2001) "Finding Nemo" (2003) Short Films (available for viewing at http://www.pixar.com/shorts/index.html) "The Adventures of Andre & Wally B." (1984) "Luxo Jr."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 8, 2012 | By Rebecca Keegan, Los Angeles Times
When his movie "John Carter" thudded into theaters in March, director Andrew Stanton escaped to New York and spent the next three weeks riding the subway, noodling on scripts and visiting with his daughter and some friends. For the first time since he started at Pixar Animation Studios in 1990 at age 24, Stanton was facing an unfamiliar sensation - the gut punch of a public failure in an industry that hardly shelters it. The film had forced Walt Disney Studios to take a $200-million write-down and helped lead to the departure of two top executives.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 2013 | By Nicole Sperling
The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences elected 10 first-time governors including Sony Pictures Co-chairman Amy Pascal to its board of directors for the upcoming year. The board's ranks have been expanded from 43 to 48. In addition to Pascal, costume designers Judianna Makovsky and Deborah Nadoolman, designers Rick Carter and Jan Pascale, documentarian Alex Gibney, film editor Lynzee Klingman, and Kathryn Blondell and Bill Corso from the makeup artists and hairstylists branch, will join the board of governors.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 2013 | By Rebecca Keegan
In the 1937 promotional film "How Walt Disney Cartoons Are Made," an announcer describes some of the intricate work going into the studio's first feature-length film, "Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs," in a department called Inking and Painting. "Here, hundreds of pretty girls in a comfortable building all their own, well-lighted, air-conditioned throughout, cover the drawings with sheets of transparent celluloid," the announcer says, over images of white-gloved young women preparing male animators' drawings for the screen.
BUSINESS
October 6, 2011 | Dawn C. Chmielewski, Los Angeles Times
When Walt Disney Co. looked to revamp its troubled retail stores in 2008, Chief Executive Robert A. Iger sought advice from the company's largest shareholder, a foremost expert on the consumer experience. Apple Inc. co-founder Steve Jobs had lured theme-park-size crowds to his company's stores with daring architecture, no-pressure sales staffs and displays that enticed customers to come in and play with the tech world's sexiest toys. Though Disney sold its chain four years earlier, its name was still on the stores.
BUSINESS
September 7, 2009 | Richard Verrier
Luxo Jr., the squeaky desk-lamp character created by animation guru John Lasseter 23 years ago, is in the spotlight again -- under the glare of a transatlantic lawsuit. The hopping swivel lamp has been a corporate mascot for Pixar Animation Studios since its founder created the character in 1986 for a short computer-animated movie that was nominated for an Academy Award. Lasseter was said to have based the character on his own Luxo lamp. Norwegian lamp maker Luxo filed a lawsuit Thursday in federal court in New York accusing Pixar and parent Walt Disney Co. of infringing its copyright by selling a limited-edition Luxo Jr. lamp packaged with a Blu-ray version of the Disney/Pixar movie "Up."
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