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SPORTS
March 17, 1988 | MARK HEISLER, Times Staff Writer
The Raiders are about to sign John Lee, the record-setting UCLA kicker who bombed out in St. Louis after being drafted higher than any other kicker in the 1980s. Lee's agent, Leigh Steinberg, says they have reached agreement. Lee will compete with Chris Bahr, who has been the Raider kicker as long as the team has been in Los Angeles, but who struggled last season. "I feel great," Lee said Wednesday from his home in Downey. "I was disappointed, the way things went with St. Louis.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 2013 | By John Horn
Movie crews can number as many as 300 people. And yet amid all that hubbub, film directors can craft the most personal moments: Joaquin Phoenix confessing his love for an operating system in "Her"; Robert Redford facing his mortality in "All Is Lost"; James Gandolfini realizing he's too old to have his heart broken again in "Enough Said. " In the fifth annual Directors Panel, six of the year's most distinguished filmmakers discuss how they carve intimacy out of chaos, what it feels like sitting across from actors dying in auditions and what they wish they had learned before they started making movies.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 2000 | RANDY LEWIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With blues legend John Lee Hooker, "how" has always been a far more relevant question than who, what, why, where or when. And that was easily the most revealing one during a rare concert appearance by the Boogie Man on Thursday at the Sun Theatre in Anaheim. Specifically, his signature growl "how, how, how, how," as identifiable a musical lick as any Chuck Berry guitar riff.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 2013 | By Victoria Kim, Los Angeles Times
Attorney Kwang Man "John" Lee, authorities say, was a man who could make things happen - for a price. For a pound of marijuana and $44,000, the Koreatown attorney allegedly said, he could get an immigrant client a U.S. citizenship. "Price is OK for the risk," Lee told an associate, according to federal authorities. The silver-Corvette-driving attorney, a former Immigration and Naturalization Service agent, allegedly had associates at various stages of the immigration process willing to take bribes and provide favors for his clients.
NEWS
May 1, 1986 | BRIAN LANDMAN, Times Staff Writer
Dave Franey could only grin when roommate John Lee was selected in the second round of the National Football League draft. During the last year, Lee, UCLA's All-American place-kicker, had teased Franey, a backup kicker who will be with the Bruins in the fall, about being from Missouri. So it was a dose of poetic justice when the St. Louis Cardinals made Lee the 32nd pick of the draft. "I guess I can't tease him about that anymore," Lee said with a smile.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 1989 | CHUCK PHILIPS
They call him the Ironman. He eats barbed wire. He gargles gasoline. He's one tough character. So when Pete Townshend began producing his new concept album based on Ted Hughes' children's story, "Ironman," he knew there was only one singer whose voice could bring the title role to life: John Lee Hooker. "I always knew that the Who were A-one fans of mine," Hooker said recently, in his low growl. "But I didn't think Pete was fool enough to ask me to try singing something I was so unfamiliar with.
SPORTS
August 14, 1986 | BRIAN LANDMAN, Times Staff Writer
John Lee, a former UCLA place-kicker and the second-round draft pick of the St. Louis Cardinals last April, has started his professional career right where he left off in college. Lee, a two-time first-team All-American, converted on field goal attempts of 39, 20 and 39 yards to help lead the Cardinals past the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, 26-10, in National Football League exhibition action last week.
SPORTS
July 28, 1986 | SCOTT OSTLER
John Lee, UCLA's record-breaking kicker, has agreed to terms with the St. Louis Cardinals and will sign a contract today for $900,000 over four years, reportedly the largest long-term contract ever for an NFL kicker. Lee was born in Korea and will become the first native of Southeast Asia ever to play in the NFL. He became a naturalized American citizen last year, the day before the USC-UCLA football game.
SPORTS
October 1, 1987 | THOMAS BONK, Times Staff Writer
The weather is supposed to be beautiful in Seoul this time of year. That is what John Lee remembers and he's going back to check it out. It should be a delightful trip. Maybe Lee will like it as much as the one he just took to Rosarito Beach and Ensenada. He probably could have kept his bags packed by the front door for a speedy getaway. Actually, he doesn't need to hurry because if there's one thing Lee has now, it's time.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 2001 | JEFF LEEDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Blues superstar John Lee Hooker, whose deep growl and ragged guitar-picking style inspired fans and musicians for generations, died Thursday. He was 83. Hooker, one of the few remaining links to the classic R&B and blues sounds that served as the foundation of rock 'n' roll, died of natural causes in his sleep early Thursday at his home in Los Altos, south of San Francisco, said his longtime booking agent, Mike Kappus.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 2012 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Director Lee Daniels has a habit of falling madly in love with characters nobody else wants, out of an underclass littered with sociopaths, psychopaths and their victims. He has done it again in the sweat-soaked noir of "The Paperboy. " It's the Florida Everglades of the 1960s, and there is nothing friendly about this place, including the backcountry alligator skinner on death row, the chippy who's fallen for him, or the journalists intent on saving him. An exceptional cast led by Nicole Kidman, Matthew McConaughey, Zac Efron and John Cusack gives these tawdry miscreants a scuzzy, sexy, sad reality that is as unerring as it is unnerving.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 2010 | By Rachel Abramowitz
After Julia Roberts turned down the starring role, executives at 20th Century Fox met with writer-director John Lee Hancock with a plan for "fixing" the script for his proposed movie "The Blind Side": Why not change the leading part from a pistol-packing Southern supermom to a man and redraft the film as a father-son story? It didn't matter that the film was based on the life of Leigh Anne Tuohy, a white Memphis interior decorator who along with her family adopted a 350-pound, homeless African American teenager, Michael Oher, and helped him become an academic success and football phenomenon who today starts for the NFL's Baltimore Ravens.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 2009 | By PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
John Lee Hancock thought he was doing a great job of racing through a day of shooting earlier this year on "The Blind Side," the new film that stars Sandra Bullock as Leigh Anne Tuohy, a no-nonsense Memphis supermom who makes room in her life for Michael Oher, a homeless, 350-pound African American teenager who ended up becoming the Baltimore Ravens' first-round pick in this year's NFL draft. But when the real Leigh Anne showed up to visit the set, she found her patience flagging after a few hours.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 2009 | By Betsy Sharkey film critic >>>
Watching "The Blind Side" is like watching your favorite football team; you'll cheer when things go well, curse when they don't, and be reminded that in football, as in life, it's how you play the game that counts -- though winning doesn't hurt, either. I'm talking to the jocks here. The rest of you can just bring Kleenex and give in to this quintessentially old-style story that is high on hope, low on cynicism and long on heart. If Frank Capra was still around, director John Lee Hancock might have had to fight him for the job. Based on the remarkable true story of Baltimore Ravens tackle Michael Oher -- once a homeless black Memphis teenager literally plucked off the road on an icy winter night by a well-heeled white family -- the movie stars Sandra Bullock as Leigh Anne Tuohy.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2004 | Manohla Dargis, Times Staff Writer
Apart from John Wayne, who says we should remember the Alamo? The Daughters of the Republic of Texas, official guardians of the historic battleground, want us to remember the monument as "the symbol of heroic courage in the face of death and the struggle against oppression." And the makers of the new movie about the 13-day siege, which like Wayne's 1960 epic is titled "The Alamo," doubtless would like us to remember the battle all the way to the box office.
TRAVEL
August 4, 2002
We visited St. Albans in May, so we thoroughly enjoyed John Lee's excellent article ("St. Albans' Sacred Place in History," July 21). However, he omitted the one fact that interested me most: Two important battles of the War of the Roses took place there. The first, in 1455, was the opening engagement in that brutal struggle for the crown. The Lancastrians held the town but were defeated, and Henry VI was captured by the Duke of York. Six years later the tables were turned when Queen Margaret and her forces routed the Yorkists and freed her husband, the king.
SPORTS
October 30, 1986 | THOMAS BONK, Times Staff Writer
This was supposed to be a big controversy. Surely without John Lee, UCLA wouldn't have anyone at all to kick field goals this football season, which would be sort of a foot fault. So how can David Franey be explained? Here's a guy who came to UCLA to play golf, switched to football and spent four years sitting on his backswing, wondering if that was par for the course.
SPORTS
November 8, 1985 | TRACY DODDS, Times Staff Writer
Whenever UCLA kicker John Lee started his windup to kick a field goal in practice this week, quarterback Matt Stevens yelled, "Zendejas!" And then Lee split the uprights. Stevens was never real specific about which of the Zendejas brothers or cousins he was chiding Lee about. Most likely it was Arizona's Max Zendejas, the man Lee will be matching kicks with Saturday night in Tucson.
NEWS
January 22, 2002 | SUSAN SALTER REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Red Water," Judith Freeman's latest novel, is nothing less than the story of a haunting--families, meadows, an entire religious community haunted by a massacre. Questions about faith, fundamentalism, passion, perseverance, humility and justice sneak up out of the southwestern landscape and from the smallest movements of the characters. In 1857, a wagon train of migrants from Arkansas crossed Utah. Gentiles, as they were called by the Mormons whose territory they were crossing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 29, 2001 | JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The blues people gathered here Thursday to say goodbye to John Lee Hooker, the sharecropper's son they knew as friend, mentor and godfather of the soulful Mississippi Delta music he loved to play. Fellow musicians, ex-managers, family and fans combined to throw a farewell party that was, as the man many called "Johnny" would have had it, part gospel, part rhythm and every bit the blues. The 83-year-old Hooker died last week in his sleep at his home in nearby Los Altos.
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