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John Lee Hancock

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April 9, 2004 | Manohla Dargis, Times Staff Writer
Apart from John Wayne, who says we should remember the Alamo? The Daughters of the Republic of Texas, official guardians of the historic battleground, want us to remember the monument as "the symbol of heroic courage in the face of death and the struggle against oppression." And the makers of the new movie about the 13-day siege, which like Wayne's 1960 epic is titled "The Alamo," doubtless would like us to remember the battle all the way to the box office.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 2014 | By Steven Zeitchik
Every award season brings the movie that everyone loves, the film that's so likable it's impossible not to like. Which always makes some people not like it. Quickly filling that role this year is John Lee Hancock's "Saving Mr. Banks," the P.L. Travers biopic-cum-"Mary Poppins" creation story, that spoonful of sugar about the making of "Spoonful of Sugar. " As you probably know, the film centers on the real-life Travers (Emma Thompson), who, after years of resisting Hollywood overtures to turn her book series into a film, grudgingly heads to Tinseltown.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 2010 | By Rachel Abramowitz
After Julia Roberts turned down the starring role, executives at 20th Century Fox met with writer-director John Lee Hancock with a plan for "fixing" the script for his proposed movie "The Blind Side": Why not change the leading part from a pistol-packing Southern supermom to a man and redraft the film as a father-son story? It didn't matter that the film was based on the life of Leigh Anne Tuohy, a white Memphis interior decorator who along with her family adopted a 350-pound, homeless African American teenager, Michael Oher, and helped him become an academic success and football phenomenon who today starts for the NFL's Baltimore Ravens.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 2013 | By Rebecca Keegan
In the winter of 1933, in a thatched cottage in Sussex, England, a complicated woman named Pamela "P.L. " Travers began to write "Mary Poppins," the first in a series of novels that would inspire the beloved 1964 Walt Disney movie and supply generations of children with a magical fantasy nanny. The reality of Travers' own turbulent childhood - and her reluctance as an adult to relinquish control over her characters to Walt Disney - are the subject of the movie "Saving Mr. Banks," which has just gone into wide release.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 2013 | By John Horn
Movie crews can number as many as 300 people. And yet amid all that hubbub, film directors can craft the most personal moments: Joaquin Phoenix confessing his love for an operating system in "Her"; Robert Redford facing his mortality in "All Is Lost"; James Gandolfini realizing he's too old to have his heart broken again in "Enough Said. " In the fifth annual Directors Panel, six of the year's most distinguished filmmakers discuss how they carve intimacy out of chaos, what it feels like sitting across from actors dying in auditions and what they wish they had learned before they started making movies.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 2003 | John Horn, Times Staff Writer
It's show business custom to lie about your age. But when you make a historical movie such as "The Alamo," fudging the truth can land you in deep trouble. Having witnessed "The Hurricane," whose factual sloppiness cost the film dearly, the filmmakers telling the story of the legendary 1836 siege of Anglo Celtic colonists by Gen. Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna's Mexican army have toiled to make their film as accurate as possible.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 2014 | By Steven Zeitchik
Every award season brings the movie that everyone loves, the film that's so likable it's impossible not to like. Which always makes some people not like it. Quickly filling that role this year is John Lee Hancock's "Saving Mr. Banks," the P.L. Travers biopic-cum-"Mary Poppins" creation story, that spoonful of sugar about the making of "Spoonful of Sugar. " As you probably know, the film centers on the real-life Travers (Emma Thompson), who, after years of resisting Hollywood overtures to turn her book series into a film, grudgingly heads to Tinseltown.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 2013 | By Rebecca Keegan
In the winter of 1933, in a thatched cottage in Sussex, England, a complicated woman named Pamela "P.L. " Travers began to write "Mary Poppins," the first in a series of novels that would inspire the beloved 1964 Walt Disney movie and supply generations of children with a magical fantasy nanny. The reality of Travers' own turbulent childhood - and her reluctance as an adult to relinquish control over her characters to Walt Disney - are the subject of the movie "Saving Mr. Banks," which has just gone into wide release.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2004 | Hugh Hart
The battle for the Alamo lasted only 90 minutes. The struggle to bring Touchstone Pictures' movie about the 1836 Texas massacre took considerably longer. Two years ago, Ron Howard and Russell Crowe were preparing their big-screen version of the siege, previously chronicled in John Wayne's 1960 action epic. When Howard's $125-million budget proved too rich for the studio's blood, Texas-born filmmaker John Lee Hancock took over, re-envisioning the story with Texas native Dennis Quaid as Sam Houston and Jason Patric playing knife-meister Jim Bowie.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 2009 | By PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
John Lee Hancock thought he was doing a great job of racing through a day of shooting earlier this year on "The Blind Side," the new film that stars Sandra Bullock as Leigh Anne Tuohy, a no-nonsense Memphis supermom who makes room in her life for Michael Oher, a homeless, 350-pound African American teenager who ended up becoming the Baltimore Ravens' first-round pick in this year's NFL draft. But when the real Leigh Anne showed up to visit the set, she found her patience flagging after a few hours.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 2013 | By John Horn
Movie crews can number as many as 300 people. And yet amid all that hubbub, film directors can craft the most personal moments: Joaquin Phoenix confessing his love for an operating system in "Her"; Robert Redford facing his mortality in "All Is Lost"; James Gandolfini realizing he's too old to have his heart broken again in "Enough Said. " In the fifth annual Directors Panel, six of the year's most distinguished filmmakers discuss how they carve intimacy out of chaos, what it feels like sitting across from actors dying in auditions and what they wish they had learned before they started making movies.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 2010 | By Rachel Abramowitz
After Julia Roberts turned down the starring role, executives at 20th Century Fox met with writer-director John Lee Hancock with a plan for "fixing" the script for his proposed movie "The Blind Side": Why not change the leading part from a pistol-packing Southern supermom to a man and redraft the film as a father-son story? It didn't matter that the film was based on the life of Leigh Anne Tuohy, a white Memphis interior decorator who along with her family adopted a 350-pound, homeless African American teenager, Michael Oher, and helped him become an academic success and football phenomenon who today starts for the NFL's Baltimore Ravens.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 2009 | By PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
John Lee Hancock thought he was doing a great job of racing through a day of shooting earlier this year on "The Blind Side," the new film that stars Sandra Bullock as Leigh Anne Tuohy, a no-nonsense Memphis supermom who makes room in her life for Michael Oher, a homeless, 350-pound African American teenager who ended up becoming the Baltimore Ravens' first-round pick in this year's NFL draft. But when the real Leigh Anne showed up to visit the set, she found her patience flagging after a few hours.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 2009 | By Betsy Sharkey film critic >>>
Watching "The Blind Side" is like watching your favorite football team; you'll cheer when things go well, curse when they don't, and be reminded that in football, as in life, it's how you play the game that counts -- though winning doesn't hurt, either. I'm talking to the jocks here. The rest of you can just bring Kleenex and give in to this quintessentially old-style story that is high on hope, low on cynicism and long on heart. If Frank Capra was still around, director John Lee Hancock might have had to fight him for the job. Based on the remarkable true story of Baltimore Ravens tackle Michael Oher -- once a homeless black Memphis teenager literally plucked off the road on an icy winter night by a well-heeled white family -- the movie stars Sandra Bullock as Leigh Anne Tuohy.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2004 | Hugh Hart
The battle for the Alamo lasted only 90 minutes. The struggle to bring Touchstone Pictures' movie about the 1836 Texas massacre took considerably longer. Two years ago, Ron Howard and Russell Crowe were preparing their big-screen version of the siege, previously chronicled in John Wayne's 1960 action epic. When Howard's $125-million budget proved too rich for the studio's blood, Texas-born filmmaker John Lee Hancock took over, re-envisioning the story with Texas native Dennis Quaid as Sam Houston and Jason Patric playing knife-meister Jim Bowie.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2004 | Manohla Dargis, Times Staff Writer
Apart from John Wayne, who says we should remember the Alamo? The Daughters of the Republic of Texas, official guardians of the historic battleground, want us to remember the monument as "the symbol of heroic courage in the face of death and the struggle against oppression." And the makers of the new movie about the 13-day siege, which like Wayne's 1960 epic is titled "The Alamo," doubtless would like us to remember the battle all the way to the box office.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 2009 | By Betsy Sharkey film critic >>>
Watching "The Blind Side" is like watching your favorite football team; you'll cheer when things go well, curse when they don't, and be reminded that in football, as in life, it's how you play the game that counts -- though winning doesn't hurt, either. I'm talking to the jocks here. The rest of you can just bring Kleenex and give in to this quintessentially old-style story that is high on hope, low on cynicism and long on heart. If Frank Capra was still around, director John Lee Hancock might have had to fight him for the job. Based on the remarkable true story of Baltimore Ravens tackle Michael Oher -- once a homeless black Memphis teenager literally plucked off the road on an icy winter night by a well-heeled white family -- the movie stars Sandra Bullock as Leigh Anne Tuohy.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 1997 | JOHN LEE HANCOCK
It's unusual for a screenwriter to participate in the shooting of a movie, but at the invitation of director Clint Eastwood, I spent last spring on the set of "Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil" helping re-create events that occurred in Savannah, Ga., 15 years ago.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 2003 | John Horn, Times Staff Writer
It's show business custom to lie about your age. But when you make a historical movie such as "The Alamo," fudging the truth can land you in deep trouble. Having witnessed "The Hurricane," whose factual sloppiness cost the film dearly, the filmmakers telling the story of the legendary 1836 siege of Anglo Celtic colonists by Gen. Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna's Mexican army have toiled to make their film as accurate as possible.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 1997 | JOHN LEE HANCOCK
It's unusual for a screenwriter to participate in the shooting of a movie, but at the invitation of director Clint Eastwood, I spent last spring on the set of "Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil" helping re-create events that occurred in Savannah, Ga., 15 years ago.
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