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John Lee Hooker

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 2001
A visitation for blues legend John Lee Hooker will be held from 1 to 7 p.m. Wednesday at Chapel of the Chimes, 4499 Piedmont Ave., in Oakland. The memorial service will take place at 1 p.m. Thursday at Oakland Inter-Stake Center Auditorium, 4780 Lincoln Ave., Oakland. In lieu of flowers, donations may be sent to the John Lee Hooker Foundation, which will direct the funds to charities involved in music education and musician assistance programs.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 29, 2001 | JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The blues people gathered here Thursday to say goodbye to John Lee Hooker, the sharecropper's son they knew as friend, mentor and godfather of the soulful Mississippi Delta music he loved to play. Fellow musicians, ex-managers, family and fans combined to throw a farewell party that was, as the man many called "Johnny" would have had it, part gospel, part rhythm and every bit the blues. The 83-year-old Hooker died last week in his sleep at his home in nearby Los Altos.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 1998 | JOHN ROOS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"I'm at a point where I'm calling the shots. I do things only when I want to. . . . I've earned that much." Sound a little cocky? Maybe, but who can argue with blues man John Lee Hooker, who has left the kind of lasting impression that only a handful of others can lay claim to? The 80-year-old legend from Clarksdale, Miss., was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1991, and he's won numerous industry awards, including two new Grammys for last year's "Don't Look Back" album.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 2001
A visitation for blues legend John Lee Hooker will be held from 1 to 7 p.m. Wednesday at Chapel of the Chimes, 4499 Piedmont Ave., in Oakland. The memorial service will take place at 1 p.m. Thursday at Oakland Inter-Stake Center Auditorium, 4780 Lincoln Ave., Oakland. In lieu of flowers, donations may be sent to the John Lee Hooker Foundation, which will direct the funds to charities involved in music education and musician assistance programs.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 1990 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Byrds, the Los Angeles band whose 1965 recording of "Mr. Tambourine Man" ignited the folk-rock movement, and Ike & Tina Turner, whose soul revue was among the most dynamic live acts ever in pop, are among the seven new inductees to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 2001 | ROBERT HILBURN, TIMES POP MUSIC CRITIC
Even though blues great John Lee Hooker was 83, his death Thursday was a shock to anyone who has ever fallen under the spell of his powerful and unrelenting sound. With his often ominous, gravelly vocals and driving, single-chord guitar style, Hooker was such a commanding presence on stage and on record that you simply couldn't imagine any force being strong enough to squeeze the life out of him. As impossible as the idea was, John Lee Hooker was supposed to be with us forever.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 1992 | STEVE HOCHMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"I wonder why they all want to know how old I am?" mused bluesman John Lee Hooker. "Every interview they want to know." The reason is pretty clear. With the recent death of Willie Dixon, Hooker, 71, is perhaps the senior surviving titan of the blues and one of the last living links to the pre-rock foundations of the music. But that's not exactly something he considers an achievement.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 1996
Nearly an hour of rare and previously unreleased Velvet Underground outtakes, demos and alternative mixes will be included in Rhino/Atlantic's "Loaded (Fully Loaded Edition)," an expanded reissue of the 1968 "Loaded" album which featured the original versions of "Sweet Jane" and "Rock & Roll" and was Lou Reed's last with the group before going solo. The two-CD set is due in April. . . . Van Morrison has produced most of a new John Lee Hooker album, "Don't Look Back," due Feb.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 2000 | RANDY LEWIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With blues legend John Lee Hooker, "how" has always been a far more relevant question than who, what, why, where or when. And that was easily the most revealing one during a rare concert appearance by the Boogie Man on Thursday at the Sun Theatre in Anaheim. Specifically, his signature growl "how, how, how, how," as identifiable a musical lick as any Chuck Berry guitar riff.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 1989 | DON SNOWDEN
Pairing the venerable boogiemaster with admirers ranging from Carlos Santana and Bonnie Raitt to Los Lobos and Robert Cray was a great idea in theory . . . but not in practice. The performances are lethargic, and the decision to drench Hooker's voice in echo was a severe miscalculation.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 2001 | ROBERT HILBURN, TIMES POP MUSIC CRITIC
Even though blues great John Lee Hooker was 83, his death Thursday was a shock to anyone who has ever fallen under the spell of his powerful and unrelenting sound. With his often ominous, gravelly vocals and driving, single-chord guitar style, Hooker was such a commanding presence on stage and on record that you simply couldn't imagine any force being strong enough to squeeze the life out of him. As impossible as the idea was, John Lee Hooker was supposed to be with us forever.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 2001 | JEFF LEEDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Blues superstar John Lee Hooker, whose deep growl and ragged guitar-picking style inspired fans and musicians for generations, died Thursday. He was 83. Hooker, one of the few remaining links to the classic R&B and blues sounds that served as the foundation of rock 'n' roll, died of natural causes in his sleep early Thursday at his home in Los Altos, south of San Francisco, said his longtime booking agent, Mike Kappus.
NEWS
October 26, 2000 | PAULA FRIEDMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When John Lee Hooker was between 5 and 7 years old, his sister's boyfriend, local Mississippi blues man Tony Hollins, gave the boy one of his old guitars to steer him clear of the couple's courting territory. It was the 1920s, and little John Lee took to the Delta woods with his guitar, dodging his father, the Rev. William Hooker, whose thunderous disapproval of devil-driven music would have halted his playing.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 2000 | RANDY LEWIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With blues legend John Lee Hooker, "how" has always been a far more relevant question than who, what, why, where or when. And that was easily the most revealing one during a rare concert appearance by the Boogie Man on Thursday at the Sun Theatre in Anaheim. Specifically, his signature growl "how, how, how, how," as identifiable a musical lick as any Chuck Berry guitar riff.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 1998 | STEVE APPLEFORD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Blues deity John Lee Hooker is a master of style. He cuts a formidable, urbane presence beneath his crisp white fedora as he sits center stage, cradling a Gibson electric guitar across his lap. Observe the dark suit and suspenders, the wraparound shades and jewelry, the desperate droning about "you-you-you-you-YOU!" His repertoire is focused on the eternal theme of love gone wrong. And this is how Hooker greeted the crowd gathered Saturday for Day 1 of the Doheny Blues Festival in Dana Point.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 1998 | JOHN ROOS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"I'm at a point where I'm calling the shots. I do things only when I want to. . . . I've earned that much." Sound a little cocky? Maybe, but who can argue with blues man John Lee Hooker, who has left the kind of lasting impression that only a handful of others can lay claim to? The 80-year-old legend from Clarksdale, Miss., was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1991, and he's won numerous industry awards, including two new Grammys for last year's "Don't Look Back" album.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 1990 | MARY CAMPBELL, ASSOCIATED PRESS
As far as John Lee Hooker is concerned, the blues wasn't born in the Mississippi Delta. He dates blues back further than that--to the Garden of Eden. "When the world was born, the blues was born," he says. "There wasn't no problem till God put man and woman together. Then started love and heartache. It turned into blues." The 73-year-old singer, guitarist and songwriter had a hit with his first record, "Boogie Chillen," in 1948.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 1998 | STEVE APPLEFORD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Blues deity John Lee Hooker is a master of style. He cuts a formidable, urbane presence beneath his crisp white fedora as he sits center stage, cradling a Gibson electric guitar across his lap. Observe the dark suit and suspenders, the wraparound shades and jewelry, the desperate droning about "you-you-you-you-YOU!" His repertoire is focused on the eternal theme of love gone wrong. And this is how Hooker greeted the crowd gathered Saturday for Day 1 of the Doheny Blues Festival in Dana Point.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 1997 | BILL LOCEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When you think about it, the blues and baseball are inextricably intertwined: Every year, every team except one--and its fans--has the blues all winter long. Blues legend and die-hard Dodger fan John Lee Hooker, who plays at the Ventura Theatre on Saturday night, knows all about both the musical genre and the sport. And he likes to talk about both. He may be 80, but Hooker always seems to have a few innings left.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 1996
Nearly an hour of rare and previously unreleased Velvet Underground outtakes, demos and alternative mixes will be included in Rhino/Atlantic's "Loaded (Fully Loaded Edition)," an expanded reissue of the 1968 "Loaded" album which featured the original versions of "Sweet Jane" and "Rock & Roll" and was Lou Reed's last with the group before going solo. The two-CD set is due in April. . . . Van Morrison has produced most of a new John Lee Hooker album, "Don't Look Back," due Feb.
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