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John Leitham

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NEWS
October 8, 1993 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES: Zan Stewart writes regularly about jazz for The Times.
Have you seen those bumper stickers that have four or five notes of music, then the words, If you can read this, thank a music teacher ? * Bassist John Leitham, a native of Phila delphia, knows a music teacher to whom he owes a debt of gratitude. He studied with a man named Al Stauffer for just a year, in 1975, but what a year it was. Stauffer, who died earlier this year, was not known outside Philadelphia, Leitham said. But "he was the most influential man I ever met," the bassist said.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 2003 | Lynell George, Times Staff Writer
One day not too long ago, bassist John Leitham disappeared. Vanished from the newspaper listings. The program lineups. The list of personnel. The void he left filled with rumors. Trombonist Bill Watrous caught wind of one while picking up a few things at his neighborhood Ralphs. A photographer he knew fairly well from the local jazz circuit stopped him. " 'So did you hear about John Leitham?' " went the pitch. " 'Well, he's not exactly John....
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 1998 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Talk to bassist John Leitham long enough, and the conversation is apt to turn to Civil War history. Talk to saxophonist Pete Christlieb, and inevitably you'll be discussing drag racing. Here's Leitham: "One of the heroes of Gettysburg was Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, a college professor who joined the Union Army and was one of its most courageous and decorated soldiers. Turns out he played bass." From Christlieb: "You don't hear much jazz at drag races.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 1998 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Talk to bassist John Leitham long enough, and the conversation is apt to turn to Civil War history. Talk to saxophonist Pete Christlieb, and inevitably you'll be discussing drag racing. Here's Leitham: "One of the heroes of Gettysburg was Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, a college professor who joined the Union Army and was one of its most courageous and decorated soldiers. Turns out he played bass." From Christlieb: "You don't hear much jazz at drag races.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 1989 | LEONARD FEATHER
Just two blocks farther south on Highland Avenue, away from the Sturm und Drang at the Hollywood Bowl, a subtler and more intimate brand of jazz was offered Sunday by the trio of pianist Joanne Grauer. "Windows on Hollywood" at the Hollywood Holiday Inn is a Sunday brunch series, now in its second year, under the aegis of the Los Angeles Jazz Society. Grauer, a lissome local presence whose influence has been limited by her infrequent recording activity, has a gentle but firm way with the standard repertoire.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 1994 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Playing jazz without a drummer is much like tightrope-walking without a net. Without a firm footing, there's a chance the music can take a nasty fall. The duo of bassist John Leitham and pianist Shelly Berg, appearing Sunday at Spaghettini, managed not only to keep on its feet, but also to hit the ground running. Though they accounted for just two-thirds of what normally constitutes a rhythm section, timekeeping was not a problem.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 2003 | Lynell George, Times Staff Writer
One day not too long ago, bassist John Leitham disappeared. Vanished from the newspaper listings. The program lineups. The list of personnel. The void he left filled with rumors. Trombonist Bill Watrous caught wind of one while picking up a few things at his neighborhood Ralphs. A photographer he knew fairly well from the local jazz circuit stopped him. " 'So did you hear about John Leitham?' " went the pitch. " 'Well, he's not exactly John....
NEWS
June 6, 1999 | DON HECKMAN and MYRNA OLIVER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Mel Torme, an inventive and gifted entertainer with a distinctive voice who became a favorite of several generations of music lovers, died Saturday morning. Torme's death came at UCLA Medical Center, attributed to complications of a stroke he suffered in 1996. He was 73. He was rushed to the hospital from his Beverly Hillshome about 1 a.m. after experiencing difficulty breathing. His family was by his side when he died a short time later.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 1986 | LEONARD FEATHER
Since a change of ownership late last year, Alfonse's, the Toluca Lake restaurant, has stepped up its music policy, which now consists of jazz seven nights a week. Tuesday the incumbents were Buddy Childers, the John Leitham Trio and the singer Diane Varga. For Childers, this was a less-than-typical setting, most of his credentials having been racked up in the trumpet sections of innumerable big bands, from Barnet and Basie to Dorsey and Goodman, not to mention seven stints with Stan Kenton.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 1991 | LEONARD FEATHER
James Morrison, a multi-instrumentalist from New South Wales, recently recorded an album for which he overdubbed four trumpets, four trombones and five saxes. Clearly, this is not a trick that can be repeated in person, nor did his local club debut Thursday at Central Park West offer much by way of compensation. Between his Australian accent and the conversational buzz (this has to be one of the noisiest rooms in town), it was hard to follow what Morrison was saying or playing.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 1994 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Playing jazz without a drummer is much like tightrope-walking without a net. Without a firm footing, there's a chance the music can take a nasty fall. The duo of bassist John Leitham and pianist Shelly Berg, appearing Sunday at Spaghettini, managed not only to keep on its feet, but also to hit the ground running. Though they accounted for just two-thirds of what normally constitutes a rhythm section, timekeeping was not a problem.
NEWS
October 8, 1993 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES: Zan Stewart writes regularly about jazz for The Times.
Have you seen those bumper stickers that have four or five notes of music, then the words, If you can read this, thank a music teacher ? * Bassist John Leitham, a native of Phila delphia, knows a music teacher to whom he owes a debt of gratitude. He studied with a man named Al Stauffer for just a year, in 1975, but what a year it was. Stauffer, who died earlier this year, was not known outside Philadelphia, Leitham said. But "he was the most influential man I ever met," the bassist said.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 1989 | LEONARD FEATHER
Just two blocks farther south on Highland Avenue, away from the Sturm und Drang at the Hollywood Bowl, a subtler and more intimate brand of jazz was offered Sunday by the trio of pianist Joanne Grauer. "Windows on Hollywood" at the Hollywood Holiday Inn is a Sunday brunch series, now in its second year, under the aegis of the Los Angeles Jazz Society. Grauer, a lissome local presence whose influence has been limited by her infrequent recording activity, has a gentle but firm way with the standard repertoire.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 1992 | LEONARD FEATHER
Like several other members of the "Tonight Show" band, drummer Ed Shaughnessy leads a double life. The quintet he brought to the Jazz Bakery on Friday has been together for six years, touring when time permits, and recording an excellent album, "Jazz in the Pocket," on Chase Records. Shaughnessy is not your ego-trip drummer who uses leadership as an excuse to show off his virtuosity.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 1991 | LEONARD FEATHER
Although years have slipped by since she left Manhattan Transfer, the "formerly with" subtitle remains the sole identification of Laurel Masse. Her performance Friday at Lunaria's offered little that has not been typical of her gigs: a hodgepodge of jazz, pop songs and the occasional novelty. In this last category was "Cow Cow Boogie," which earned a big hand, perhaps on the strength of its new lease on life thanks to an airline commercial.
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