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John Lewis

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NEWS
September 6, 2012 | By Christi Parsons
CHARLOTTE, N.C. -- Civil rights veteran John Lewis tonight urged African Americans to turn out to polls this fall as never before in defiance of new voting requirements he equated with those of the Jim Crow South. “Do you want to go back?” the Georgia congressman asked the crowd at the Democratic National Convention. “Or do you want to keep America moving forward?” New voter laws raise the requirements to vote in Florida, Ohio, Pennsylvania and several other states, where their sponsors say they are intended to fight voter fraud.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 2013 | Elaine Woo
If John Egerton liked you - and he liked nearly everyone he met - he might have hauled out an antique contraption called a biscuit brake, whipped up a batch of special unleavened dough and cajoled you into cranking the device while he related the story behind beaten biscuits, an old Southern favorite. He would tell you that in the pre-mechanical days the dough would be beaten with a mallet or even the side of an ax - an arduous task left to slave cooks in wealthy antebellum households.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 2001 | DON HECKMAN, Don Heckman writes frequently about jazz for The Times
There is a famous story, perhaps apocryphal, that describes an incident in which pianist-composer John Lewis once fined vibraphonist Milt Jackson for showing up for a Modern Jazz Quartet concert wearing the wrong color socks. True or not, the tale defines both players' roles in a group that for decades was viewed by many as the ultimate example of conservative chamber jazz music. Some criticized what they viewed as Lewis' excessive infatuation with classical music and forms.
NATIONAL
August 28, 2013 | By Alexei Koseff, This post has been updated. See below for details.
WASHINGTON -- Rep. John Lewis (D-Ga.), the veteran civil rights activist, urged the country to remember and build on the progress of the last five decades during a speech at the 50th anniversary celebration of the March on Washington. "Sometimes I hear people saying, 'Nothing has changed,' " Lewis said. "Come and walk in my shoes. " Lewis, who was the youngest speaker at the original 1963 event, grew up in the cotton fields of Alabama and has served in Congress for more than 25 years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 1994
State Sen. John R. Lewis (R-Orange) appears to enjoy witch hunts more than the real work of a legislator: introducing bills, lobbying for their passage, getting them signed into law. Lewis' latest target is a real humdinger, the mother of a man who had the effrontery to run against him in the 1992 Republican primary. Lewis trounced his opponent, Newport Beach attorney Todd Thakar. Yet the legislator was unhappy with what he took to be personal attacks, and he is getting his revenge now.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 1991 | BOB SCHWARTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two more candidates--Assemblyman John Lewis (R-Orange) and Orange County Transportation Commission Chairman Dana W. Reed--added their names Tuesday to the growing list of candidates for the 35th Senate District seat being vacated by newly appointed U.S. Sen. John Seymour. "Over the past several days, many friends, neighbors and supporters have called to urge me to run for Senate," Lewis said in a press release. "I was flattered . . .
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 1991 | DAVE LESHER, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
The Orange County Republican Party's executive committee declared Thursday that state Senate candidate Dana Reed violated the party's campaign code of conduct in a letter he mailed to voters last week attacking one of his opponents, Assemblyman John R. Lewis of Orange. A brief statement issued by the executive committee did not give any details about how the party's rules were violated by the letter from Reed's campaign.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 1993 | ERIC BAILEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An effort by an Orange County state senator to oust Yorba Linda Councilman Henry Wedaa from his post as chairman of the powerful South Coast Air Quality Management District was dealt a critical blow Monday in a key legislative committee. The Assembly Natural Resources Committee, long a graveyard for anti-AQMD legislation, balked at a bill authored by Sen. John Lewis (R-Orange) that would strip Wedaa of the protection that has kept his enemies at bay.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 1993 | VICKI TORRES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three of the four people convicted of a brutal 1991 kidnap-and-murder rampage dubbed the "mall murders" were spared the death sentence Wednesday by a Pomona jury that--in an unusual move--issued a plea against child abuse. After deliberating for less than a day, the Superior Court jurors recommended life in state prison without possibility of parole for Vincent Hubbard, 27; Robbin Machuca, 27, and Eileen Huber, 21.
BOOKS
June 14, 1998 | JACK NELSON, Jack Nelson is the chief Washington correspondent for The Times. In the 1960s, he was the paper's Atlanta bureau chief and covered the civil rights movement
John Lewis was the first protester to disembark from a Freedom Ride bus in Montgomery, Ala., on May 20, 1960, to face hundreds of angry whites armed with baseball bats, bricks, pipes, tire irons and other weapons. They ran at the bus from all directions, screaming, "Get the niggers, get the niggers." Lewis was knocked cold by a burly white man swinging a wooden Coca-Cola crate. Five years later, on Bloody Sunday, March 7, 1965, in Selma, Ala.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 2013 | By Nicole Sperling
For the Oxford-born, Nigeria-raised David Oyelowo, the last few years have been a profoundly deep - and sometimes harrowing - dive into the African American experience. The actor has played a Tuskegee airman in George Lucas' "Red Tails," a U.S. cavalryman in Steven Spielberg's "Lincoln," and a Southern preacher in "The Help. " But things really got intense when he had to endure abuse at a segregated lunch counter and mobs of Klansmen for his part as a civil rights activist in "Lee Daniels' The Butler.
NEWS
September 6, 2012 | By Christi Parsons
CHARLOTTE, N.C. -- Civil rights veteran John Lewis tonight urged African Americans to turn out to polls this fall as never before in defiance of new voting requirements he equated with those of the Jim Crow South. “Do you want to go back?” the Georgia congressman asked the crowd at the Democratic National Convention. “Or do you want to keep America moving forward?” New voter laws raise the requirements to vote in Florida, Ohio, Pennsylvania and several other states, where their sponsors say they are intended to fight voter fraud.
NATIONAL
February 28, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Civil rights leader John Lewis dropped his support for Hillary Rodham Clinton's presidential bid Wednesday in favor of Barack Obama. Lewis, a Democratic congressman from Atlanta, is the most prominent black leader to defect from Clinton's campaign in the face of near-unanimous black support for Obama in recent voting. He also is a superdelegate who gets a vote at this summer's national convention in Denver.
BOOKS
May 16, 2004 | William Pfaff, William Pfaff is the author of numerous books, including "Barbarian Sentiments: America in the New Century" and, most recently, "Fear, Anger and Failure: A Chronicle of the Bush Administration's War Against Terror, From the Attacks of 2001 to Defeat in Baghdad."
In "The Lesser Evil: Political Ethics in an Age of Terror," Michael Ignatieff addresses the ethical problems faced by liberal democracies, noting that "the beginning of wisdom ... is that democracies should not attempt to rule others against their consent." Good advice. Unfortunately it is a rule the United States too often breaks, as in Iraq today.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 2001 | JON THURBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John Lewis, the pianist, primary composer and musical director for the legendary Modern Jazz Quartet, died Thursday at his home in Manhattan, N.Y., after a lengthy battle with prostate cancer. He was 80. One of the most influential musicians in jazz over the last half-century, Lewis was once described by critic Leonard Feather as "the most rational and imperturbable artist in his field."
BUSINESS
February 7, 2001
* A U.S. unit of Swiss food giant Nestle agreed to settle consumer class-action suits alleging it has fraudulently advertised its Calistoga and Arrowhead bottled water as being mountain spring water. A California judge gave preliminarily approval to the settlement, under which Great Spring Waters of America will make $5 million in coupons and other discounts available to consumers for five years. The company also agreed to make $4.
NEWS
January 24, 1990 | DANIEL M. WEINTRAUB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A state appeals court on Tuesday dismissed a felony forgery charge against Republican Assemblyman John R. Lewis of Orange, ruling that Lewis committed no crime even if he did order the mailing of hundreds of thousands of campaign letters bearing the phony signature of former President Ronald Reagan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 1991
A Dec. 2 preliminary hearing has been set for four defendants accused in the series of five San Gabriel Valley kidnap-murders dubbed the "mall murders." The four defendants--John Lewis, Vincent Hubbard, Robin Machuca and Eileen Huber--appeared briefly Wednesday in Citrus Municipal Court in West Covina with their attorneys. Judge Fred Felix said the hearing will take one week. Felix kept in place a gag order sealing the case and preventing attorneys from talking to reporters.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 2001 | DON HECKMAN, Don Heckman writes frequently about jazz for The Times
There is a famous story, perhaps apocryphal, that describes an incident in which pianist-composer John Lewis once fined vibraphonist Milt Jackson for showing up for a Modern Jazz Quartet concert wearing the wrong color socks. True or not, the tale defines both players' roles in a group that for decades was viewed by many as the ultimate example of conservative chamber jazz music. Some criticized what they viewed as Lewis' excessive infatuation with classical music and forms.
OPINION
July 26, 1998 | Robert Scheer, Robert Scheer, a contributing editor to The Times, is a columnist for the Op-Ed page
Recorded history is cruel in its indifference to the struggles of ordinary folks, and the unassuming heroes are the first to be forgotten. On a recent visit to the Westside office of The Times, not a one among the dozen young reporters working at their computers could place the gentle but solidly built middle-aged black man who had shown up for this interview. Although he has been a U.S.
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