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John Lindberg

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BUSINESS
July 1, 1988 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ, Times Staff Writer
The founder of a failed San Jose investment firm agreed Thursday to plead guilty to three federal criminal charges, the day after a jury awarded a record $147 million in punitive damages to investors in his company. The U.S. attorney's office in San Jose filed mail and securities fraud charges against Harry C. Stern, the founder and former chairman of Technical Equities, and John Lindberg, a former executive in the firm. Joseph M. Burton, the assistant U.S.
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BUSINESS
July 1, 1988 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ, Times Staff Writer
The founder of a failed San Jose investment firm agreed Thursday to plead guilty to three federal criminal charges, the day after a jury awarded a record $147 million in punitive damages to investors in his company. The U.S. attorney's office in San Jose filed mail and securities fraud charges against Harry C. Stern, the founder and former chairman of Technical Equities, and John Lindberg, a former executive in the firm. Joseph M. Burton, the assistant U.S.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 1989 | DON HECKMAN
Add the New York String Trio to the list of chamber ensembles who are carving out a broadly-eclectic new area of contemporary musical performance. In an appearance at Pasadena's stately old Castle Green Friday night, the violin-guitar-bass ensemble, like such West Coast-based groups as the Kronos Quartet, the Turtle Island Quartet and the Greene Quartet, underscored the burgeoning potential of acoustic improvisational music.
BUSINESS
July 29, 1988 | United Press International
A judge Thursday upheld a $147-million jury verdict--the largest investment fraud settlement in California history--and scolded directors of now-defunct Technical Equities Corp. "This involves the systematic taking of the life savings of old people," Santa Clara County Superior Court Judge Conrad Rushing told former Technical Equities head Harry Stern and other company principals. "They did it over and over. The actions are clearly as reprehensible as any I've seen.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 1996 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
At the core of composer-pianist Anthony Davis' chamber piece, "Happy Valley Blues," given its premiere West Coast performance at the Cerritos Center for the Performing Arts on Saturday, is a stout bass line, the kind of foundation that frequently anchors jazz composition. But surrounding that core are sections without rhythmic anchor--freely improvised exchanges between piano, violin, guitar and bass that impart a feeling of uncertainty and disharmony.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 2002 | Sallie Hofmeister, Times Staff Writer
After two years of abstinence, Southern California's largest cable provider, Adelphia Communications Corp., will again air such sexual fare as Playboy TV and the Spice networks. The company confirmed Tuesday that it will launch so-called adult programming on its systems nationwide starting next year.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 2010 | By Chris Barton
The spirit of Miles Davis was in the air at Barnsdall Gallery Theater on Saturday night. A genre deeply tied to its history, jazz is somewhat unique in that its players are inevitably linked to those who defined their given instrument's sound. Take on the saxophone and John Coltrane and Sonny Rollins shadow your work. Master the piano and the names Bill Evans and Thelonious Monk are frequently invoked. So while the Davis comparisons may have been unavoidable as trumpeter Wadada Leo Smith took the stage with his Golden Quartet, the difference during two sprawling, invigorating sets was how expertly Smith and his charges not only recalled Davis at his most uncompromising but also built upon his legacy to the point where such comparisons soon lost meaning.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 1986 | DON SNOWDEN
Billy Bang won the 1981 Downbeat Critics' Poll in the Talent Deserving Wider Recognition category for violin, but there's no love lost between the New York-based musician and the instrument. "It was the most hated instrument for me," related Bang, 38, by phone from Oakland recently. "It's too European and it's never been in my blood. The Temptations never played it and James Brown never sang with one. "I learned about Bartok, Chopin and everything else and I couldn't relate to it.
NEWS
March 14, 1985 | THERESA WALKER, Times Staff Writer
The Eagle Rock Christian Food Center has plenty of food--too much, in fact. The food center needs a new home because the 3,000 pounds of canned goods, cereals and grains stored on the second floor of the Eagle Rock Covenant Church are too heavy for the building. For six weeks the food center has been seeking donated space in the Eagle Rock area of northeast Los Angeles.
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