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July 16, 1992 | RICK VANDERKNYFF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
OK, so maybe it's not as big a deal as Dylan going electric, but the decision by They Might Be Giants to hire a band after nine years of performing to taped backup is causing a bit of apprehension among some fans of the quirky Brooklyn-based duo. "This is a very dramatic change for us," acknowledged John Linnell, the accordion-playing half of the team. "For years, we've had people asking us when we were going to get a band together. . . .
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 1999 | JOHN ROOS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
You expect silliness from They Might Be Giants, the veteran pop-rockers from Brooklyn who bestowed on us such instantly hummable ditties as "Don't Let's Start," "Particle Man," and "Birdhouse in Your Soul." Now, singer-songwriter-instrumentalist John Linnell--one-half of the wacky duo--has just released his first solo album, "State Songs" (Rounder/Zoe Records).
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 1999 | JOHN ROOS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
You expect silliness from They Might Be Giants, the veteran pop-rockers from Brooklyn who bestowed on us such instantly hummable ditties as "Don't Let's Start," "Particle Man," and "Birdhouse in Your Soul." Now, singer-songwriter-instrumentalist John Linnell--one-half of the wacky duo--has just released his first solo album, "State Songs" (Rounder/Zoe Records).
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 1992 | RICK VANDERKNYFF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
OK, so maybe it's not as big a deal as Dylan going electric, but the decision by They Might Be Giants to hire a band after nine years of performing to taped backup is causing a bit of apprehension among some fans of the quirky Brooklyn-based duo. "This is a very dramatic change for us," acknowledged John Linnell, the accordion-playing half of the team. "For years, we've had people asking us when we were going to get a band together. . . .
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 1988 | CHRIS WILLMAN
They Might Be Giants is a New York-based duo that's almost enough to give novelty songs a good name. Not that the typical Weird Al Yankovic fan would likely get and/or enjoy songs like "Alienation's for the Rich," from the duo's wonderful 1986 independent LP debut, or "Kiss Me, Son of God," one of many newer songs premiered in the pair's first Los Angeles gig Friday at Club Lingerie.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 1992 | RICHARD CROMELIN
John Flansburgh and John Linnell look like partners in a high school science fair project rather than a rock band. They named their group after the play and the movie "They Might Be Giants," their primary instrumentation is guitar and accordion and they sing in flat, earnest voices about mammal biology, aspects of scale, space travel and the interior obsessions of the archetypal loner.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 1992 | RICHARD CROMELIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John Flansburgh and John Linnell look like partners in a high school science fair project rather than a rock band. They named their group after the play and the movie "They Might Be Giants," their primary instrumentation is guitar and accordion and they sing in flat, earnest voices about mammal biology, aspects of scale, space travel and the interior obsessions of the archetypal loner.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2004 | Lynne Heffley, Times Staff Writer
"Welcome to the world of rock music. All rock concerts are exactly like this."
NEWS
June 20, 2002 | LYNNE HEFFLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Audio "No!," They Might Be Giants. Idlewild Recordings/Rounder Records. CD: $18. Ages 5 to 12 (and adult TMBG fans). www.giantkid.net /www.theymightbegiants.com Children's albums don't come any better--or more wonderfully strange--than "No!," a first-time family recording by alternative pop duo They Might Be Giants, otherwise known as John Flansburgh and John Linnell.
NEWS
February 24, 2005 | Lynne Heffley
"Here Come the ABCs" Disney Sound/ Walt Disney Records 48 minutes; DVD: $12.98 The offbeat rock duo They Might Be Giants (John Flansburgh and John Linnell) crossed over into children's music with the 2002 CD release "No!," a collection of original songs as musically innovative as they are playfully surreal. Flansburgh and Linnell weren't slumming. After "No!"
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 1989 | Chris Willman
Attention all employers: If you've been noticing the mysterious number (718) 387-6962 popping up increasingly on those office phone bills, wonder no more. It's the Dial-a-Song service of They Might Be Giants. For four years the skewed rock duo from New Jersey has been offering callers a new song on the line each day, publicizing the number with the added enticement that the service is, of course, "free if you call from work." For most fans, one song a day won't do.
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