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John Linner

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May 3, 1991 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The alleged weapon was a bottle of nasal spray laced with poison. The man charged with attempted murder hardly has the look of a killer. John Linner's beefy body is usually framed by sandals and baseball caps, and he prides himself on his chili-fixing ability. He is also a research scientist who developed a breakthrough process in the world of cryobiology, the study of organisms at reduced temperatures. And now he sits in the Montgomery County jail in Conroe, Tex.
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NEWS
May 3, 1991 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The alleged weapon was a bottle of nasal spray laced with poison. The man charged with attempted murder hardly has the look of a killer. John Linner's beefy body is usually framed by sandals and baseball caps, and he prides himself on his chili-fixing ability. He is also a research scientist who developed a breakthrough process in the world of cryobiology, the study of organisms at reduced temperatures. And now he sits in the Montgomery County jail in Conroe, Tex.
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NEWS
July 14, 1991 | SCOTT McCARTNEY, ASSOCIATED PRESS
His nose stuffed up by a sinus problem, Barry van Winkle reached into his oak desk drawer for a bottle of nasal spray, placed it in one nostril, and inhaled. Instantly, he knew something was terribly wrong. Pain shot through his face. It felt as if battery acid had been injected into his head. Van Winkle ran across the biotechnology office's blue carpet and flushed his nose out with emergency eyewash as best he could. He may have saved his life. Or maybe not.
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