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John Logan

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NEWS
November 10, 1987
John Logan, a poet whose output concerned itself with traditional religion and who had been poetry editor of the Nation, has died at the age of 64. He died Friday in San Francisco of unreported causes. Logan, whose work was praised by colleagues and critics but remained largely unknown to the public, founded and edited the Chicago poetry magazine Choice in the early 1960s, and published numerous books of poetry and prose.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 2014 | By Yvonne Villarreal
It's a tale of monsters and men. “Penny Dreadful,” Showtime's upcoming psychological horror thriller from John Logan (“Skyfall”),  centers on an American (played by Josh Hartnett) who finds himself trapped in the darkest corners of Victorian London amongst some of literature's iconic monsters. It's a world that Logan, who was promoting the show Thursday during Showtime's session at the Television Critics Assn. press tour in Pasadena, says he was destined to take part in, having grown up watching “Groovie Goolies” and eating Frankenberry.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 2004 | Sid Smith, Chicago Tribune
Actor-director Frank Galati tells the quintessential John Logan anecdote. "His home in Evanston was gorgeous, an immense, yellow brick villa with a capacious garden," Galati says. "You walked up these broad stone stairs onto a terrace and into rooms with Minimalist decor and exquisite art objects. "But, as you gazed down a long, long corridor, there, at the end, stood a giant, life-size statue of the Alien." Logan to a T: elegant, tasteful, history conscious, slightly mischievous and increasingly a player in Hollywood.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan
I never had dinner at Sue Mengers' house, and though I had a nodding acquaintance with her completely charming husband, director Jean-Claude Tramont, I never even met the woman in question. But after seeing John Logan's "I"ll Eat You Last: A Chat With Sue Mengers," a bracing play about the woman who in her prime was viewed as the most powerful talent agent in the world, I wish I had. And, judging from the reaction on opening night at the Geffen Playhouse, a lot of other people shared that wish.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan
I never had dinner at Sue Mengers' house, and though I had a nodding acquaintance with her completely charming husband, director Jean-Claude Tramont, I never even met the woman in question. But after seeing John Logan's "I"ll Eat You Last: A Chat With Sue Mengers," a bracing play about the woman who in her prime was viewed as the most powerful talent agent in the world, I wish I had. And, judging from the reaction on opening night at the Geffen Playhouse, a lot of other people shared that wish.
BUSINESS
May 10, 2008 | From Times Wire Services
Take-Two Interactive Software Inc. said "Pirates of the Caribbean" director Gore Verbinski will make a movie version of "BioShock," its hit video game about an underwater utopia gone disastrously wrong. The movie will be made by Universal Pictures, a unit of NBC Universal owned by General Electric Co. John Logan, writer of "Gladiator" and "Sweeney Todd," was in talks to pen the screenplay, New York-based Take-Two said.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 2013 | By Jamie Wetherbe
Sting returns to his roots for "The Last Ship," a new musical based on the singer-songwriter's childhood, with an eye toward Broadway. The show, set in a struggling English shipyard in the 1980s, also has spawned an album of the same name -- his first in a decade -- to be to be released Sept. 24. Producers hope to bring "The Last Ship” to Broadway next year. PHOTOS: Hollywood stars on stage The Grammy winner spent three years penning the score, collaborating with Brian Yorkey (“Next to Normal”)
NEWS
February 17, 2012 | By Christopher Reynolds, Los Angeles Times staff writer
This is the year of Mark Rothko in Portland, which means not only a proliferation of bright-colored blobs under those oft-gray skies, but also a flurry of arts and lodging offers. At the core of the festivities is the Portland Art Museum, which will show a Rothko exhibition Feb. 18-May 27. It features 45 of the artist's works, from early figurative paintings to later abstract works, borrowed from the Rothko family, the National Gallery of Art and private collectors.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 2013 | By F. Kathleen Foley
Just what hasn't Tony Abatemarco done in his several decades as a performer? Certainly  he has est ablished himself as a performer of the first rank over the years in an incredibly varied array of roles. Now Abatemarco takes on the challenge of portraying Mark Rothko in “Red,” John Logan's Tony-winning two-person drama about that titanic, troubled artist in the late 1950s, in the years before his 1970 suicide. The play is essentially a Socratic interchange between Rothko and his assistant, Ken (Patrick Stafford, in a sensitive, savvy turn)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2013 | By Rebecca Keegan, Los Angeles Times
A Hollywood striver in the 1970s would have learned oodles from Sue Mengers - how to woo a client, sass a studio exec, host a dinner party, smoke a joint. And, had she pulled up a seat in Mengers' Beverly Hills living room one particularly gloomy day in the agent's career in 1981, she would have learned how it feels when the town's warm winds suddenly blow cold. That's the point when we meet Mengers in "I'll Eat You Last," a one-woman show opening Wednesday on Broadway. The eagerly anticipated production stars Bette Midler as Mengers, the onetime rep for stars such as Barbra Streisand, Candice Bergen, Michael Caine, Faye Dunaway, Gene Hackman, Ali MacGraw, Burt Reynolds and Nick Nolte.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 2013
Ray Grebey Headed baseball negotiations during 1981 players strike Ray Grebey, 85, who led Major League Baseball labor negotiations during the tumultuous 50-day strike that split the 1981 season, died Aug. 28 in Stamford, Conn. His family said he had stomach cancer. Hired by baseball owners in 1978 after 20 years at General Electric Co., Grebey succeeded John Gaherin as the sport's chief labor negotiator. After arbitrator Peter Seitz struck down the reserve clause, Gaherin worked out the deal in 1976 that created free agency.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 2013 | By Devin Kelly
John “Juke” Logan, 66 , a Los Angeles-based blues harmonica player whose wailing melodies can be picked out of the theme music for the 1990s TV sitcoms “Roseanne” and “Home Improvement,” died Aug. 30 at his home in Joshua Tree.  The cause was complications of esophageal cancer, said longtime friend Dan Duehren, co-founder of California Vintage Guitar and Amp in Sherman Oaks. An animated showman, singer and bandleader, Logan earned a reputation as a go-to harmonic a player for jingles, soundtracks and other recording sessions.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 2013 | By F. Kathleen Foley
Just what hasn't Tony Abatemarco done in his several decades as a performer? Certainly  he has est ablished himself as a performer of the first rank over the years in an incredibly varied array of roles. Now Abatemarco takes on the challenge of portraying Mark Rothko in “Red,” John Logan's Tony-winning two-person drama about that titanic, troubled artist in the late 1950s, in the years before his 1970 suicide. The play is essentially a Socratic interchange between Rothko and his assistant, Ken (Patrick Stafford, in a sensitive, savvy turn)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 2013 | By Jamie Wetherbe
Sting returns to his roots for "The Last Ship," a new musical based on the singer-songwriter's childhood, with an eye toward Broadway. The show, set in a struggling English shipyard in the 1980s, also has spawned an album of the same name -- his first in a decade -- to be to be released Sept. 24. Producers hope to bring "The Last Ship” to Broadway next year. PHOTOS: Hollywood stars on stage The Grammy winner spent three years penning the score, collaborating with Brian Yorkey (“Next to Normal”)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2013 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
NEW YORK - Enthroned on her couch in Beverly Hills, Hollywood superagent Sue Mengers did not go gentle into that good night but, instead, gossiped and tattled against the dying of the light. Well, she's back holding court in her modest (by neighborhood standards, anyway) palace, which has been relocated to Broadway's Booth Theatre. Here Bette Midler, draped in a turquoise caftan like a sedentary 1980s queen too tired even for browsing on Rodeo Drive, delivers Mengers' ribald wit and agentry wisdom in John Logan's "I'll Eat You Last: A Chat With Sue Mengers.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2013 | By Rebecca Keegan, Los Angeles Times
A Hollywood striver in the 1970s would have learned oodles from Sue Mengers - how to woo a client, sass a studio exec, host a dinner party, smoke a joint. And, had she pulled up a seat in Mengers' Beverly Hills living room one particularly gloomy day in the agent's career in 1981, she would have learned how it feels when the town's warm winds suddenly blow cold. That's the point when we meet Mengers in "I'll Eat You Last," a one-woman show opening Wednesday on Broadway. The eagerly anticipated production stars Bette Midler as Mengers, the onetime rep for stars such as Barbra Streisand, Candice Bergen, Michael Caine, Faye Dunaway, Gene Hackman, Ali MacGraw, Burt Reynolds and Nick Nolte.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2013 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
NEW YORK - Enthroned on her couch in Beverly Hills, Hollywood superagent Sue Mengers did not go gentle into that good night but, instead, gossiped and tattled against the dying of the light. Well, she's back holding court in her modest (by neighborhood standards, anyway) palace, which has been relocated to Broadway's Booth Theatre. Here Bette Midler, draped in a turquoise caftan like a sedentary 1980s queen too tired even for browsing on Rodeo Drive, delivers Mengers' ribald wit and agentry wisdom in John Logan's "I'll Eat You Last: A Chat With Sue Mengers.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 2014 | By Yvonne Villarreal
It's a tale of monsters and men. “Penny Dreadful,” Showtime's upcoming psychological horror thriller from John Logan (“Skyfall”),  centers on an American (played by Josh Hartnett) who finds himself trapped in the darkest corners of Victorian London amongst some of literature's iconic monsters. It's a world that Logan, who was promoting the show Thursday during Showtime's session at the Television Critics Assn. press tour in Pasadena, says he was destined to take part in, having grown up watching “Groovie Goolies” and eating Frankenberry.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 2012 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
As imagined by John Logan in his Tony-winning drama "Red" and portrayed by the galvanizing Alfred Molina, painter Mark Rothko is a man of fierce convictions and fiery words. His opinions about art are delivered like biblical proclamations, spoken in the Old Testament cadences of a burning bush. As he holds forth on the nobility of highbrow ambition and the ignominy of commercial frivolity you might momentarily think you've stumbled into a town hall on the fate of the Museum of Contemporary Art. In fact, you are at the Mark Taper Forum, where this sensational production from London's Donmar Warehouse (and later Broadway)
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 2012 | By David Pagel
Works of art can do just about anything - except explain how other works of art work. That's one of the reasons many movies and books about artists fall short. They presume to tell us the truth about things they are in no position to explain, much less match the artistry of. Documentary films do not face this problem. Three recent ones work wonders because they allow their subjects to speak for themselves. More important, Matthew Akers' "Marina Abramovic: The Artist Is Present," Corinna Belz's"Gerhard Richter Painting"and Neil Berkeley's "Beauty Is Embarrassing" do not reveal how Abramovic, Richter or Wayne White make their work.
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