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John Lott

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 1999
Several letters June 6 showed support for Sheriff Mike Carona's willingness to provide more permits to carry concealed weapons. These National Rifle Assn. advocates have been using bad data and telling half-truths for a while now, so this is not a surprise. Robert Davenport made reference to the infamous John Lott research, which gun advocates like to refer to. In analyzing the Lott Report, the Johns Hopkins University Center for Gun Policy and Research and criminologists concluded that the claims were unsubstantiated, the conclusions were implausible and the report used "incorrect and discredited methodology" and included errors in stating when concealed weapons laws were implemented in various states.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 2012 | By Meredith Blake
In response to the horrific massacre in Newtown, Conn., CNN's Piers Morgan devoted his Friday broadcast to coverage of the tragedy and to a discussion - make that a shouting match - about gun control. Joining him were Steve Dulan of the Michigan Coalition of Responsible Gun Owners, Rep. Jerrold Nadler (D-N.Y.), Dan Gross of the Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence and gun-rights advocate John Lott. The conversation got heated when Morgan asked “why on Earth” anyone would advocate for more guns, given the unspeakable carnage at Sandy Hook.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 8, 1997
Re "Unraveling Some Brady Law Falsehoods," Commentary, July 2: The U.S. Supreme Court decision regarding background checks has no impact whatsoever on California's law. John Lott's commentary could leave the opposite impression. Lott's contention that "women benefited much more than men from carrying concealed handguns" is based on false assumptions. Women, in fact, have not bought into the gun lobby's myth of self-protection. During the past 10 years, the number of women gun owners has flatlined at 7%-11% (Smith and Smith, 1995)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 2000
"Felons Get Concealed Gun Licenses Under Bush's 'Tough' Law" (Oct. 3) misses the point of concealed carry permits. When you shine a spotlight on any group of people, whether they be clergy, policemen or stockbrokers, you are going to find some bad seeds. The important thing to consider is how arrest rates for Texas concealed carry holders compare with arrest rates for the general population. Concealed carry licensees are actually more law-abiding than the average person. Licensees are 5.7 times less likely to be arrested for violent offenses and 14 times less likely to be arrested for nonviolent offenses than the general public.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 2000
"Felons Get Concealed Gun Licenses Under Bush's 'Tough' Law" (Oct. 3) misses the point of concealed carry permits. When you shine a spotlight on any group of people, whether they be clergy, policemen or stockbrokers, you are going to find some bad seeds. The important thing to consider is how arrest rates for Texas concealed carry holders compare with arrest rates for the general population. Concealed carry licensees are actually more law-abiding than the average person. Licensees are 5.7 times less likely to be arrested for violent offenses and 14 times less likely to be arrested for nonviolent offenses than the general public.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 4, 1998
How right you are that we would be better off with fewer guns ("Gun Policy That Misfires," Sept. 25 editorial). And how unfortunate it is that Orange County Sheriff-elect Mike Carona has set out to push for more guns on the basis of John Lott's theory that more concealed guns would mean less crime. Why would Carona be so quick to latch on to a study that experts in the field of criminology have so thoroughly rejected, saying it is "fundamentally flawed"; with "absolutely no credible evidence to support the idea that permissive concealed carry laws reduce violent crime"; and "It would be a mistake to formulate policy based on Lott's study."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 2012 | By Meredith Blake
In response to the horrific massacre in Newtown, Conn., CNN's Piers Morgan devoted his Friday broadcast to coverage of the tragedy and to a discussion - make that a shouting match - about gun control. Joining him were Steve Dulan of the Michigan Coalition of Responsible Gun Owners, Rep. Jerrold Nadler (D-N.Y.), Dan Gross of the Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence and gun-rights advocate John Lott. The conversation got heated when Morgan asked “why on Earth” anyone would advocate for more guns, given the unspeakable carnage at Sandy Hook.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 1996 | ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John W. Lottes, president of the Art Institute of Southern California, died Monday of an inoperable brain tumor, according to his family. He was 62. Lottes, who had been president of Orange County's only private four-year art college since 1991, had been on medical leave since Nov. 1, said the institute's chief financial officer, James D. Godek, who has been its acting president.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 1994 | ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The leafy view from John W. Lottes' office-cum-treehouse, nestled among the sycamores that line Laguna Canyon, often can take the edge off the most stressful day. The same view, however, can also spark fretful memories. Less than a year ago, firefighters were battling canyon-ravaging flames to keep them from reaching the Art Institute of Southern California, Orange County's only private four-year art college, where Lottes is president.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 1991 | CATHY CURTIS
Shortly after he was installed as president of the Art Institute of Southern California last month, John W. Lottes attended a party held by the support group Designing Women. "One of my goals," he told the well-heeled, well-coiffed crowd, "is to get each of you to commit at least as much to the school as you spend on your hair." Lottes related the story with jovial gusto last week, during a wide-ranging conversation in his office.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 1999
Several letters June 6 showed support for Sheriff Mike Carona's willingness to provide more permits to carry concealed weapons. These National Rifle Assn. advocates have been using bad data and telling half-truths for a while now, so this is not a surprise. Robert Davenport made reference to the infamous John Lott research, which gun advocates like to refer to. In analyzing the Lott Report, the Johns Hopkins University Center for Gun Policy and Research and criminologists concluded that the claims were unsubstantiated, the conclusions were implausible and the report used "incorrect and discredited methodology" and included errors in stating when concealed weapons laws were implemented in various states.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 4, 1998
How right you are that we would be better off with fewer guns ("Gun Policy That Misfires," Sept. 25 editorial). And how unfortunate it is that Orange County Sheriff-elect Mike Carona has set out to push for more guns on the basis of John Lott's theory that more concealed guns would mean less crime. Why would Carona be so quick to latch on to a study that experts in the field of criminology have so thoroughly rejected, saying it is "fundamentally flawed"; with "absolutely no credible evidence to support the idea that permissive concealed carry laws reduce violent crime"; and "It would be a mistake to formulate policy based on Lott's study."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 8, 1997
Re "Unraveling Some Brady Law Falsehoods," Commentary, July 2: The U.S. Supreme Court decision regarding background checks has no impact whatsoever on California's law. John Lott's commentary could leave the opposite impression. Lott's contention that "women benefited much more than men from carrying concealed handguns" is based on false assumptions. Women, in fact, have not bought into the gun lobby's myth of self-protection. During the past 10 years, the number of women gun owners has flatlined at 7%-11% (Smith and Smith, 1995)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 1996 | ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John W. Lottes, president of the Art Institute of Southern California, died Monday of an inoperable brain tumor, according to his family. He was 62. Lottes, who had been president of Orange County's only private four-year art college since 1991, had been on medical leave since Nov. 1, said the institute's chief financial officer, James D. Godek, who has been its acting president.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 1994 | ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The leafy view from John W. Lottes' office-cum-treehouse, nestled among the sycamores that line Laguna Canyon, often can take the edge off the most stressful day. The same view, however, can also spark fretful memories. Less than a year ago, firefighters were battling canyon-ravaging flames to keep them from reaching the Art Institute of Southern California, Orange County's only private four-year art college, where Lottes is president.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 1991 | CATHY CURTIS
Shortly after he was installed as president of the Art Institute of Southern California last month, John W. Lottes attended a party held by the support group Designing Women. "One of my goals," he told the well-heeled, well-coiffed crowd, "is to get each of you to commit at least as much to the school as you spend on your hair." Lottes related the story with jovial gusto last week, during a wide-ranging conversation in his office.
OPINION
November 22, 2004
Re "Breaking the Siege in the Judge War," Commentary, Nov. 16: It is unfortunate that some "qualified" judicial nominees are held up by the Senate. However, a rule change ending filibusters is not the answer. The statement by John Lott and Sonya Jones that this change would result in a system that "better serves everyone's interests" is disingenuous at best. The fact that a minority party has some power over judicial nominations is why the founding fathers created the "advice and consent" role in the Constitution.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 1997
In the article last Sunday dealing with the recent string of slayings in our safe communities, I find it interesting that Ventura County Sheriff Capt. Larry Robertson would suggest arming yourself as a way to protect against random acts of violence. In an article titled "Crime Deterrence and Right to Carry Concealed Handguns" in the January issue of The Journal of Legal Studies, John Lott Jr. of the University of Chicago Law School reports that when state right-to-carry (concealed weapons)
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