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John Lurie

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ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 1998 | PAUL BROWNFIELD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There are cable shows, and then there is "Fishing With John," which is very cable. The John of the title is John Lurie, a part-time movie actor, full-time jazz musician-composer who also likes to fish. Lurie isn't a particularly good fisherman, but he has gone to some interesting places with some famous friends, including musician Tom Waits and actor Willem Dafoe. They fish, they sit there, they fish some more.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 2014 | By Chris Barton
Looking back from the fragmented media landscape of 2014, it's hard to imagine someone like John Lurie was ever possible. An immediately recognizable character actor who appeared in landmark indie films including Jim Jarmusch's "Down by Law" and "Stranger Than Paradise," Lurie was also a brilliant saxophonist who helped push the boundaries of jazz in the '80s and '90s with his band, the Lounge Lizards. But Lurie was forced to give up music and acting after being stricken with advanced Lyme disease and has since switched to painting (his work has been exhibited numerous times and was collected in a 2007 book, "A Fine Example of Art")
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 2014 | By Chris Barton
Looking back from the fragmented media landscape of 2014, it's hard to imagine someone like John Lurie was ever possible. An immediately recognizable character actor who appeared in landmark indie films including Jim Jarmusch's "Down by Law" and "Stranger Than Paradise," Lurie was also a brilliant saxophonist who helped push the boundaries of jazz in the '80s and '90s with his band, the Lounge Lizards. But Lurie was forced to give up music and acting after being stricken with advanced Lyme disease and has since switched to painting (his work has been exhibited numerous times and was collected in a 2007 book, "A Fine Example of Art")
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 1998 | PAUL BROWNFIELD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There are cable shows, and then there is "Fishing With John," which is very cable. The John of the title is John Lurie, a part-time movie actor, full-time jazz musician-composer who also likes to fish. Lurie isn't a particularly good fisherman, but he has gone to some interesting places with some famous friends, including musician Tom Waits and actor Willem Dafoe. They fish, they sit there, they fish some more.
NEWS
November 2, 2004 | Shermakaye Bass
Fishing With John, Segment 4: Maine, with Willem Dafoe Directed by John Lurie DVD, $26.96 The thought of Willem Dafoe offering his parka-padded armpit in a selfless gesture while fishing on a frozen lake in northern Maine may seem scary. But it's a matter of survival in this hilarious ice fishing saga, a cross between "Waiting for Godot" and "Deep Thoughts by Jack Handy."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 1987 | KEVIN THOMAS, Compiled by Terry Atkinson
"Variety." Media. $69.95. What sly fun this near-surreal, low-budget Manhattan movie is. Director Bette Gordon's pretty, wholesome-looking heroine (Sandy McLeod), in need of a job, becomes a box-office cashier at a Times Square porno theater, an experience that unleashes her sexual imagination. There's a zany, intensely visual, odysseylike quality to "Variety" that recalls Jim Jarmusch's "Stranger Than Paradise" and Susan Seidelman's "Desperately Seeking Susan."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 1986 | SHEILA BENSON
With the arrival last week of Jim Jarmusch's latest drollery, we suddenly have access to two films of utter originality: Jarmusch's "Down by Law" and David Lynch's "Blue Velvet." And quite apart from their special stamp, they mark a real turning point in the way we perceive film making. One was made for an independent production company, the other for what can be called a major studio. But both, I would warrant, are exactly the film each director wished to make, down to the tiniest detail.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 1998 | NATALIE NICHOLS
"If you see someone talking, don't shush them, just punch 'em," joked Lounge Lizards leader John Lurie at the El Rey Theatre on Friday. The New York-based saxophonist and his octet had half-hypnotized an attentive throng of hipsters with their funky, cinematic chamber jazz, but Lurie still thought some were chatting too loudly through the quiet parts.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 1995 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Harvey Keitel, director Wayne Wang and writer Paul Auster had such fun making "Smoke" they got their producers to go along with a second film, "Blue in the Face," in which Keitel returns as Augie Wren, proprietor of the Brooklyn Cigar Co. Several other characters from the first film return, too.
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