Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJohn M Dowd
IN THE NEWS

John M Dowd

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
May 9, 1989
The lawyer heading baseball's investigation of Pete Rose expects to present his report to Commissioner Bart Giamatti later this week. "It's a substantial report that the commissioner can read and study," John M. Dowd said. Three of Rose's lawyers last week questioned whether Dowd's investigation was complete. But Dowd, hired by the commissioner's office to investigate charges that Rose has bet on baseball, doubts that there will be further reports after the one he submits this week.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 2001 | RICHARD CROMELIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In his song "Big Wave," Johnny Dowd creates a character who lies on his deathbed and recalls his grand adventures as a surfer--which turn out to be pure fantasy, "West Virginia born and raised/Had my surfboard on my car/I've left home many times/But I never went too far," he sings. "It was just one of those songs about someone wanting to leave home," says Dowd, who plays the Knitting Factory Hollywood on Friday. "It's about a character that wanted that but never could cut the ties."
Advertisement
SPORTS
May 4, 1989
Baseball's investigation into Pete Rose's alleged gambling will be completed next week when a report is submitted to Commissioner Bart Giamatti. Rich Levin, a spokesman for the commissioner, said that John M. Dowd, the Washington lawyer heading the inquiry, would submit his findings to Giamatti, who will then decide if any action will be taken against the Cincinnati Reds' manager. There was no indication as to when Giamatti would make a decision. Rose, who has refused to comment on whether he bet on baseball, missed two games against Montreal because of flu and returned to Cincinnati Wednesday rather than go to New York with the team.
SPORTS
October 26, 1999 | BILL PLASCHKE
Baseball has Pete Rose in a pickle. It wants to ask him gambling questions he doesn't want to answer. Pete Rose is sprinting in one direction, stopping, turning, sprinting in the other direction, asking the world why baseball is doing this to him. "I didn't know I could be that bad of a guy," he says, wincing. A national audience is transfixed by the hunt, feels sorry for the hunted, wonders the same thing. A man walks the streets in an Uncle Sam suit, carrying a sign reading, "Free Mr.
SPORTS
May 9, 1989 | From Times wire services
Baseball moved another step closer today to deciding the fate of Cincinnati Reds manager Pete Rose. John M. Dowd, the lawyer leading Commissioner A. Bartlett Giamatti's investigation of Rose, has submitted his report to the commissioner's office. A statement from the commissioner today said: "John Dowd . . . has submitted his report to me regarding allegations concerning Mr. Pete Rose. Should any additional information relevant to the investigation be obtained, he will forward it to me. I will now study the report thoroughly."
SPORTS
May 20, 1989 | Associated Press
Pete Rose's lawyers Friday asked for a 30-day postponement of next Thursday's hearing before Baseball Commissioner Bart Giamatti, who is investigating gambling allegations against the Cincinnati manager. "Late Friday afternoon, the commissioner's office received from Pete Rose's counsel a request for a 30-day extension of the hearing date set for May 25," a spokesman for the commissioner said in New York. "The commissioner will respond on Monday." Reuven J. Katz, one of Rose's lawyers, said the postponement was asked "for purposes to prepare," adding: "It's obvious that originally we got a report and seven volumes.
SPORTS
July 3, 1989
A Chicago bookie told a Chicago newspaper that records of bets Pete Rose allegedly made should have been destroyed, or organized crime members would have placed a hit on the bookmaker. "Hanging on to records is stupid," the bookmaker, who did not want his name used, was quoted in the Chicago Sun-Times. "Not only would it be unfair to the customers and yourself, but the (outfit) would put you out of business for leaving evidence lying around. That's a ticket to the penitentiary."
NEWS
June 26, 1989 | From Associated Press
Baseball's lawyers today asked an Ohio appellate court to suspend a judge's ruling that postponed Pete Rose's hearing before Commissioner Bart Giamatti, saying the lower court's restraining order "threatens the very reputation of major league baseball." In a 220-page request for the suspension of the temporary restraining order granted Sunday by Commons Pleas Judge Norbert A. Nadel, baseball called the ruling unprecedented. "For the last several weeks, the charges against Pete Rose have focused enormous public attention on gambling and the possible corruption of the game," baseball said in asking that the temporary restraining order be suspended.
SPORTS
June 27, 1989 | Associated Press
Pete Rose bet $2,000 per game on the Cincinnati Reds and other baseball teams during the summer of 1987 and set up an extensive gambling network over a three-year period, according to a report prepared for the commissioner's office and released Monday. The 225-page report, compiled by investigator John M. Dowd was publicly released by Hamilton County Common Pleas Judge Norbert A. Nadel under pressure from the Ohio Supreme Court, which said he had no reason to keep it sealed. On Sunday, Nadel granted the Reds manager a temporary restraining order that blocked baseball Commissioner Bart Giamatti from holding a hearing Monday on the gambling allegation.
SPORTS
July 1, 1989 | From Associated Press
Commissioner Bart Giamatti will not allow anyone else to decide whether Pete Rose bet on his own team, a baseball official said Friday. And contrary to published reports, there have been no settlement discussions between the two sides, Deputy Commissioner Francis Vincent Jr. said. He also said there was no chance Giamatti would remove himself from the case--presumably a provision that lawyers for the Cincinnati Reds manager would demand in any possible settlement.
SPORTS
October 12, 1990 | MARYANN HUDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Claiming that Baseball Commissioner Fay Vincent's conduct has constituted a "mockery of justice," an attorney for George Steinbrenner has formally called on major league baseball's executive council for an impartial investigation of Vincent's handling of Steinbrenner's removal from baseball, according to documents obtained Thursday by The Times.
SPORTS
August 17, 1990 | From Associated Press
Two minority owners of the New York Yankees, trying to keep George Steinbrenner in power, sued Commissioner Fay Vincent and investigator John Dowd Thursday and likened their investigation of the club owner to an "inquisition." The suit, filed in U.S. District Court by limited partners Daniel R. McCarthy and Harold M. Bowman, seeks to nullify Steinbrenner's July 30 agreement with Vincent by which Steinbrenner agreed to quit as managing general partner of the Yankees by Monday.
SPORTS
July 3, 1989
A Chicago bookie told a Chicago newspaper that records of bets Pete Rose allegedly made should have been destroyed, or organized crime members would have placed a hit on the bookmaker. "Hanging on to records is stupid," the bookmaker, who did not want his name used, was quoted in the Chicago Sun-Times. "Not only would it be unfair to the customers and yourself, but the (outfit) would put you out of business for leaving evidence lying around. That's a ticket to the penitentiary."
SPORTS
July 2, 1989
Pete Rose said Saturday that anyone who believes his Cincinnati players can aid an investigation of charges that he gambled on the Reds is "looking for trouble." Rose, facing a lifetime ban if the charges are proved, has received the support of at least one player and the club's radio announcer in attempting to downplay testimony obtained by baseball investigators.
SPORTS
July 1, 1989 | From Associated Press
Commissioner Bart Giamatti will not allow anyone else to decide whether Pete Rose bet on his own team, a baseball official said Friday. And contrary to published reports, there have been no settlement discussions between the two sides, Deputy Commissioner Francis Vincent Jr. said. He also said there was no chance Giamatti would remove himself from the case--presumably a provision that lawyers for the Cincinnati Reds manager would demand in any possible settlement.
NEWS
June 27, 1989 | EARL GUSTKEY, Times Staff Writer
A special investigator's report to major league baseball on Pete Rose's alleged gambling, made public Monday by a Cincinnati judge, accuses the Cincinnati Reds' manager of betting not only on major league games but on his own team's games as well, from 1985 to 1987. Lawyers for Rose won a temporary restraining order Sunday, preventing baseball from conducting a hearing with Rose--one was scheduled for today--until at least July 6. But the Ohio Supreme Court, responding to a suit filed Monday by the Cleveland Plain Dealer, ordered Judge Norbert A. Nadel of Hamilton County Common Pleas Court to release the report or explain why. Nadel, the same judge who Sunday had issued the temporary restraining order, complied reluctantly with the court's order.
SPORTS
July 1, 1989 | DAN LE BATARD, Times Staff Writer
Denny McLain, ex-pitcher and ex-con, spoke from the heart Friday when discussing Pete Rose, the embattled Cincinnati Reds manager who faces a possible lifetime ban from baseball for allegedly betting on his team. Nineteen years ago, as a member of the Detroit Tigers, McLain was suspended by Bowie Kuhn, the then-rookie baseball commissioner, for associating with gamblers. Later, he served 29 months of a 23-year prison sentence for racketeering, extortion, conspiracy and cocaine possession.
SPORTS
July 1, 1989 | DAN LE BATARD, Times Staff Writer
Denny McLain, ex-pitcher and ex-con, spoke from the heart Friday when discussing Pete Rose, the embattled Cincinnati Reds manager who faces a possible lifetime ban from baseball for allegedly betting on his team. Nineteen years ago, as a member of the Detroit Tigers, McLain was suspended by Bowie Kuhn, the then-rookie baseball commissioner, for associating with gamblers. Later, he served 29 months of a 23-year prison sentence for racketeering, extortion, conspiracy and cocaine possession.
NEWS
June 27, 1989 | EARL GUSTKEY, Times Staff Writer
A special investigator's report to major league baseball on Pete Rose's alleged gambling, made public Monday by a Cincinnati judge, accuses the Cincinnati Reds' manager of betting not only on major league games but on his own team's games as well, from 1985 to 1987. Lawyers for Rose won a temporary restraining order Sunday, preventing baseball from conducting a hearing with Rose--one was scheduled for today--until at least July 6. But the Ohio Supreme Court, responding to a suit filed Monday by the Cleveland Plain Dealer, ordered Judge Norbert A. Nadel of Hamilton County Common Pleas Court to release the report or explain why. Nadel, the same judge who Sunday had issued the temporary restraining order, complied reluctantly with the court's order.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|