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John M Fife

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 1987 | Associated Press
A year after eight members of the sanctuary movement were placed on probation for helping to smuggle Central American aliens, they still see the movement as vital and growing. Their prosecutor sees it as dead. The verdict "was the death knell for the sanctuary movement" and its sympathizers, said Donald M. Reno, a special assistant U.S. attorney, but as the government's point man on the defendants' appeal he remains deeply involved. The Rev. John M.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 1992 | From Religious News Service
The Rev. John Fife of Tucson, an activist pastor who led a movement to shelter immigrants from Central America, is the new moderator of the nation's largest Presbyterian denomination. Fife, 52, was elected this week to the highest office of the 2.9-million-member Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) at the denomination's 204th General Assembly, which meets here through Wednesday.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 1992 | From Religious News Service
The Rev. John Fife of Tucson, an activist pastor who led a movement to shelter immigrants from Central America, is the new moderator of the nation's largest Presbyterian denomination. Fife, 52, was elected this week to the highest office of the 2.9-million-member Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) at the denomination's 204th General Assembly, which meets here through Wednesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 1987 | Associated Press
A year after eight members of the sanctuary movement were placed on probation for helping to smuggle Central American aliens, they still see the movement as vital and growing. Their prosecutor sees it as dead. The verdict "was the death knell for the sanctuary movement" and its sympathizers, said Donald M. Reno, a special assistant U.S. attorney, but as the government's point man on the defendants' appeal he remains deeply involved. The Rev. John M.
NEWS
April 4, 1986 | BILL CURRY, Times Staff Writer
The sanctuary movement to help Central Americans resettle illegally in the United States is a church ministry of "good people" working openly and not a criminal conspiracy, the lawyer for a founder of the movement declared Thursday as he began the defense's closing arguments in the trial of 11 church workers here. The lawyer, Robert J.
NEWS
January 25, 1985 | Associated Press
A sanctuary movement worker was acquitted Thursday of illegally transporting Salvadoran refugees. "I've been confident all along," said Jack Elder, who silently bowed his head as the verdict was read. The seven-man, five-woman federal court jury deliberated less than two hours before finding Elder, the director of Casa Oscar Romero, a halfway house for Central Americans in San Benito, Tex., not guilty.
NEWS
January 15, 1985 | RONALD J. OSTROW, Times Staff Writer
A federal grand jury in Arizona, cracking down on the growing Central American sanctuary movement, has indicted 16 persons--including three nuns, two priests and a minister--on charges of smuggling refugees into the United States. Government sources here said that the indictment was handed down in Phoenix last Thursday but sealed until Monday so Immigration and Naturalization Service agents in several cities could arrest 65 refugees and hold them as material witnesses.
NEWS
April 5, 1986 | BILL CURRY, Times Staff Writer
The trial of 11 church workers, facing charges in connection with their work in the nation's sanctuary movement, took a bitter turn Friday with defense lawyers accusing the judge of bias and the prosecutor accusing them of "inflammatory and prejudicial statements" to the jury. The federal district judge, for his part, accused the defense of straying beyond earlier court rulings that limited a religious-based defense of the movement's activities.
NEWS
November 16, 1985 | LAURIE BECKLUND, Times Staff Writer
Leaders of the religious sanctuary movement are "generals" in a three-tiered criminal enterprise that specializes in smuggling Central Americans into the United States illegally, federal prosecutors charged Friday on the first day of trial of 11 religious and lay activists in the sanctuary movement. Special Assistant U.S. Atty. Donald Reno Jr.
NEWS
July 1, 1986 | LEE MAY, Times Staff Writer
In an unusual move, 47 members of Congress have written a letter to a federal judge in an effort to lighten the sentences of eight Christian activists convicted recently in Arizona of helping to find sanctuary for Salvadorans fleeing their homeland, it was learned Monday. The letter asks U.S. District Judge Earl H. Carroll, who will pass sentence on the activists today, to "consider the underlying circumstances in Central America and the humanitarian motives of the defendants."
NEWS
May 2, 1986 | BILL CURRY, Times Staff Writer
Eight sanctuary movement activists--including a co-founder of the nationwide effort to help illegal aliens fleeing Central America--were convicted Thursday of 16 felony charges stemming from their church-based activities, but three others were acquitted by a U.S. District Court jury here. Defense lawyers said they will appeal the convictions. "Justice was done," Assistant U.S. Atty. Donald M. Reno Jr. said. "The American system of justice fulfilled its function.
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