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John M Shalikashvili

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NEWS
October 6, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Senate confirmed Army Gen. John M. Shalikashvili, President Clinton's choice to head the Joint Chiefs of Staff. By voice vote, the Senate approved the four-star general, who succeeds retired Gen. Colin L. Powell as the Joint Chiefs chairman. Powell stepped down last week.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 2011 | By Stephen Ceasar, Los Angeles Times
Retired Army Gen. John M. Shalikashvili, who became the first foreign-born chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and guided military and humanitarian efforts in the post-Cold War era of the 1990s, has died. He was 75. Shalikashvili died Saturday morning at Madigan Army Medical Center in Washington state of complications from a stroke, the Army said in a statement. A native of Poland, Shalikashvili rose to the top military post at the Pentagon during the Clinton administration, from 1993 to 1997.
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NEWS
October 1, 1997 | Associated Press
Between the booming of cannon and the roar of fighter planes, President Clinton bade farewell Tuesday to Gen. John M. Shalikashvili as chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. A native of Warsaw, Poland, whose first taste of warfare came at age 3 when Hitler's tanks rolled over his native land, Shalikashvili brought his military career to a close with a full-dress military ceremony, and much of official Washington looking on.
NEWS
October 1, 1997 | Associated Press
Between the booming of cannon and the roar of fighter planes, President Clinton bade farewell Tuesday to Gen. John M. Shalikashvili as chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. A native of Warsaw, Poland, whose first taste of warfare came at age 3 when Hitler's tanks rolled over his native land, Shalikashvili brought his military career to a close with a full-dress military ceremony, and much of official Washington looking on.
NEWS
March 10, 1994 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff said Wednesday that the number of U.S. ground troops needed to enforce any peace accord in Bosnia-Herzegovina would be greater than the Clinton Administration is estimating. Gen. John M. Shalikashvili warned against understating the number for political purposes. He said he believes that the enforcement effort would take about 50,000 troops rather than the 15,000 to 45,000 the Administration estimates.
NEWS
May 25, 1997 | ERIC SLATER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Of course Gen. John M. Shalikashvili, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, would love to speak at his niece's college graduation, the Army Intelligence folks were saying last summer. But there would be a few details to attend to. He would need some 20 hotel rooms--some of them south-facing so the satellite equipment could be hung out the windows.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 2011 | By Stephen Ceasar, Los Angeles Times
Retired Army Gen. John M. Shalikashvili, who became the first foreign-born chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and guided military and humanitarian efforts in the post-Cold War era of the 1990s, has died. He was 75. Shalikashvili died Saturday morning at Madigan Army Medical Center in Washington state of complications from a stroke, the Army said in a statement. A native of Poland, Shalikashvili rose to the top military post at the Pentagon during the Clinton administration, from 1993 to 1997.
NEWS
July 1, 1995 | Associated Press
President Clinton will nominate Army Gen. John M. Shalikashvili for a second two-year term as chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. Clinton announced the nomination Friday.
NEWS
June 9, 1995 | Associated Press
Gen. John M. Shalikashvili, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and Adm. William Owens, the vice chairman, urged House members to reject a proposal to expand the fleet of costly B-2 Stealth bombers, saying in a letter released Thursday that there are "more pressing requirements."
NEWS
September 17, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Senate unanimously confirmed Army Gen. Henry H. Shelton to become chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. Shelton, a 55-year-old Green Beret paratrooper who led U.S. forces in Haiti, replaces Gen. John M. Shalikashvili, who will retire at the end of this month. He will be the third Army general in a row to fill a job that has traditionally rotated among the military services.
NEWS
May 25, 1997 | ERIC SLATER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Of course Gen. John M. Shalikashvili, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, would love to speak at his niece's college graduation, the Army Intelligence folks were saying last summer. But there would be a few details to attend to. He would need some 20 hotel rooms--some of them south-facing so the satellite equipment could be hung out the windows.
NEWS
March 10, 1994 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff said Wednesday that the number of U.S. ground troops needed to enforce any peace accord in Bosnia-Herzegovina would be greater than the Clinton Administration is estimating. Gen. John M. Shalikashvili warned against understating the number for political purposes. He said he believes that the enforcement effort would take about 50,000 troops rather than the 15,000 to 45,000 the Administration estimates.
NEWS
October 6, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Senate confirmed Army Gen. John M. Shalikashvili, President Clinton's choice to head the Joint Chiefs of Staff. By voice vote, the Senate approved the four-star general, who succeeds retired Gen. Colin L. Powell as the Joint Chiefs chairman. Powell stepped down last week.
NEWS
May 25, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A year of scandal and tragedy, capped by the suicide of the Navy's chief officer, drew to a close for graduating U.S. Naval Academy midshipmen, who were reminded by the nation's top military official that they must withstand public scrutiny. "Don't fall into the trap of becoming defensive, or circling the wagons against imaginary enemies outside," Army Gen. John M. Shalikashvili, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, told the 918 graduates in Annapolis, Md.
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