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John M Wilson

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 1988
I read John M. Wilson's brave words about his big pain ("O Hemingway, Which Way, No Way," April 17). The sun will rise again. There will be other Imitation Hemingway competitions. Wilson will continue to collect his weekly salary to complain about what a man must complain about. I feel sick. Send me a check. DAN STEINBROCKER (A Non-Entrant) Los Angeles
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 1988
Thank you, John M. Wilson, for the eloquent rebuttal to George Will's truly offensive column on Jack Kerouac and the freedom of spirit he embodied ("In Defense of Kerouac," Sept. 11). Sadly, I have read more Will than Kerouac in my lifetime. And while Will's work is often enlightening, I couldn't help but feel attacked by his bitter piece. What mean-spiritedness is it in Will that causes him to delight in what he perceives to be the "cruel" fate of yesterday's radicals? Newsweek should reprint Wilson's piece so readers could be reminded that Will's perspective is far from universal.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 1987
Hey, instead of an Imitation Hemingway Contest, how about an Imitation Wilson Contest ("A Farewell to Contests," by John M. Wilson, Dec. 13)? The top prize--a round-trip and dinner for two (and maybe Wilson included) at Circus Circus in Las Vegas. But first, a contest to name Wilson's football-playing gorilla. I think Slynegger has a ring to it. VAL RODRIGUEZ Signal Hill
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 1988
I read John M. Wilson's brave words about his big pain ("O Hemingway, Which Way, No Way," April 17). The sun will rise again. There will be other Imitation Hemingway competitions. Wilson will continue to collect his weekly salary to complain about what a man must complain about. I feel sick. Send me a check. DAN STEINBROCKER (A Non-Entrant) Los Angeles
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 1988
Thank you, John M. Wilson, for the eloquent rebuttal to George Will's truly offensive column on Jack Kerouac and the freedom of spirit he embodied ("In Defense of Kerouac," Sept. 11). Sadly, I have read more Will than Kerouac in my lifetime. And while Will's work is often enlightening, I couldn't help but feel attacked by his bitter piece. What mean-spiritedness is it in Will that causes him to delight in what he perceives to be the "cruel" fate of yesterday's radicals? Newsweek should reprint Wilson's piece so readers could be reminded that Will's perspective is far from universal.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 1986
Having absolutely no desire to defend Mike Curb, we must nevertheless take issue with the tone of John M. Wilson's item that implied that non-union film making is something less than moral (Outtakes, Oct. 26). There are many experienced and talented film technicians to whom the unions will not grant entrance. Should these people not be allowed to work and make a living except as "second class" film citizens? Most of the production in Los Angeles now seems to be non-union due to simple financial realities.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 1985
The following letter from E.T. (as translated by those he trusts) is in response to last Sunday's Calendar cover, inset, which showed him wearing drug paraphernalia. It was delivered by friends of E.T.'s from Universal Studios and Steven Spielberg's Amblin Entertainment. Calendar Section Earth Dear Calendar: I'm very sad; life at the top can be lonely. I just got off the intergalactic cellular with Elliott. He read me John M. Wilson's article ("The Second Coming"), and then transmitted a facsimile of the drawing that appeared on the cover of Calendar dated June 16, 1985, Earth years.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 1988
John M. Wilson's Outtakes item March 28 credited Bob Morones with the casting of "La Bamba." While Morones has cast other fine films, "La Bamba" was very fortunate to have had the talents of Junie Lowry as its casting director. LUIS VALDEZ Writer/Director "La Bamba"
ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 1990
Re the July 22 article on "outing" by Pat H. Broeske and John M. Wilson: Tattle-taling on closeted homosexuals. Yes! Just of kind of juicy smut I savor. You tantalize with tidbits: ". . . the alleged lesbianism of the daughter of a popular performer," a former model who ". . . claimed she had a relationship with a prominent TV and film actress." Yes! Yes! Don't stop! The excitement is building. The breath is faster. I turn the pages quickly. Pressure is mounting. Who? I want names, dammit!
ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 1987
I find it interesting that Steve Tisch says that he'd feel irresponsible making "Risky Business" today because it was aimed at teen-agers and "introduced them to the world of call girls and casual sex" ("Is Hollywood Getting the Message About Safe Sex?" by John M. Wilson, July 19). It was OK in 1983 but not today because of AIDS, right? He and other film makers are suddenly exhibiting a conscience about the negative role models they've been giving this vulnerable age group for years now. Parents who are trying to raise their children with strong values and high morals don't want to be thankful for a killer virus--but it's real tempting.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 1987
Hey, instead of an Imitation Hemingway Contest, how about an Imitation Wilson Contest ("A Farewell to Contests," by John M. Wilson, Dec. 13)? The top prize--a round-trip and dinner for two (and maybe Wilson included) at Circus Circus in Las Vegas. But first, a contest to name Wilson's football-playing gorilla. I think Slynegger has a ring to it. VAL RODRIGUEZ Signal Hill
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 1986
Having absolutely no desire to defend Mike Curb, we must nevertheless take issue with the tone of John M. Wilson's item that implied that non-union film making is something less than moral (Outtakes, Oct. 26). There are many experienced and talented film technicians to whom the unions will not grant entrance. Should these people not be allowed to work and make a living except as "second class" film citizens? Most of the production in Los Angeles now seems to be non-union due to simple financial realities.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 1985
The following letter from E.T. (as translated by those he trusts) is in response to last Sunday's Calendar cover, inset, which showed him wearing drug paraphernalia. It was delivered by friends of E.T.'s from Universal Studios and Steven Spielberg's Amblin Entertainment. Calendar Section Earth Dear Calendar: I'm very sad; life at the top can be lonely. I just got off the intergalactic cellular with Elliott. He read me John M. Wilson's article ("The Second Coming"), and then transmitted a facsimile of the drawing that appeared on the cover of Calendar dated June 16, 1985, Earth years.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 1986
"The Road to Emporia" (by John M. Wilson, Aug. 10) touched a sensitive nerve. I was born in Emporia, Kan., went to school there, and graduated from Emporia State University. How paradoxical that one of the nicest small communities in the country has been given media space, not for its marvelous life style, nor its fine community and schools, nor even William Allen White, but because of an "aberration" of the worst kind. Perhaps the lesson to be learned is that there is no perfect nation, state, community nor person.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 1985
I am shocked by artist Will Weston's depiction of E.T. on the front cover of The Times' Calendar section ("The Second Coming," by John M. Wilson, June 16). E.T. has become an international symbol of all that is good about the innocence of children and familial morality. Why The Times would become a party to an unconscionable perversion of those ideals is incomprehensible. At a time when many of us are reaching out to impressionable children with costly efforts to dissuade them from becoming a part of the drug culture, their most impressionistic symbol is emblazoned on the cover of Calendar, adorned with a cocaine spoon, a razor blade and cocaine horns.
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