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August 11, 1991 | JOE LEYDON, Joe Leydon is the film critic of the Houston Post.
Stroll down the Main Street ramp to the police headquarters basement, step over the electrical cables and ease past the extras and the onlookers, and there it is: The slo-mo black-and-white nightmare of Nov. 24, 1963, time-warped to full color, flash-and-blood life. If you're of a certain age and remember that long Sunday, you know this dance of death by heart.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 1991 | JOE LEYDON, Joe Leydon is the film critic of the Houston Post.
Stroll down the Main Street ramp to the police headquarters basement, step over the electrical cables and ease past the extras and the onlookers, and there it is: The slo-mo black-and-white nightmare of Nov. 24, 1963, time-warped to full color, flash-and-blood life. If you're of a certain age and remember that long Sunday, you know this dance of death by heart.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 1986 | HOWARD ROSENBERG, Times Television Critic
"Act of Vengeance" is another example of Home Box Office's intention to punctuate its schedule with ambitious original drama. Yet the two-hour production--which abruptly concludes with the 1969 slaying of labor leader Jock Yablonski and his wife and daughter--turns out to be a narrowly focused murder story that all but ignores the broader, critical, fascinating issue of unionism (see related story below). The drama premiers on the pay-cable network at 8 p.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 1988
The Fabulous Baker Boys (Gladden/Mirage). Shooting in L.A. Ivory-tinkling lounge musicians Jeff Bridges and bro' Beau perform the title roles with Michelle Pfeiffer tagging along for the fun. Director/screenwriter Steve Kloves. Distributor Fox. Summer release. Lethal Weapon 2 (Silver). Shooting in L.A. Richard Donner directs wacko cop/title character Mel Gibson and cautious partner Danny Glover in this sequel set three years later.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 1990 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even though "The Last of the Finest" opened citywide last Friday without benefit of press previews the fact that Brian Dennehy was billed above its title was encouraging. As it turns out, it's a terrific cop-action picture, imaginative and entertaining, that could have benefited from opening-day reviews.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 1990 | TERRY ATKINSON
THIS WEEK'S MOVIES Sometimes, a movie can work too well. Maybe that's what happened with "Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer." Just out this week on video, the controversial drama looks at murder from the viewpoint of the murderer. That angle was too graphic for the MPAA, which slapped an X rating on the 1989 release. One result: severely limited theatrical release. Directed by John McNaughton and starring Michael Rooker, "Henry" will probably be seen by many more people as a cassette.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 1995 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
HBO's newest movie, "The Infiltrator," at once delivers a warning about neo-Nazism and undermines that message through weak execution. Based on Yaron Svoray and Nick Taylor's non-fiction book, "In Hitler's Shadow," it too often lacks the intensity one should expect from a teleplay (by Guy Andrews) that details a perilous undercover probe of skinheads and their race-supremacist allies in modern Germany.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 1992 | PETER RAINER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
First there was "JFK." Now there's "Ruby." What's next, "Lee, We Hardly Knew Ye?"? The fascination of some filmmakers for the J.F.K. assassination may make for some highly dubious history, but it's no wonder these movies get made: The conspiracy theories, replete with mobsters and shady CIA operatives and para-military yahoos, are movie naturals. They're a melodramatist's dream--high-level muckraking with a lurid overlay. In "Ruby" (citywide), we're given an askew view of the conspiracy.
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