Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJohn Mackey
IN THE NEWS

John Mackey

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 8, 2011 | By Sam Farmer, Los Angeles Times
John Mackey, who helped revolutionize the NFL's tight end position and whose post-football struggles with dementia became emblematic of the brutality of the game, has died. He was 69. Mackey died Wednesday in Baltimore after a 10-year battle with frontal temporal dementia, the Baltimore Sun reported. A former president of the NFL Players Assn., Mackey spent 10 seasons with the Baltimore Colts and San Diego Chargers, catching 331 passes for 5,236 yards and 38 touchdowns — including a 75-yard score on a tipped ball to help lift the Colts over the Dallas Cowboys in Super Bowl V in 1971.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
January 25, 2013 | By Tiffany Hsu
Business, says Whole Foods co-Chief Executive John Mackey, has “a horrible reputation.” But instead of being “selfish and greedy and exploitative,” as it's often portrayed, business is actually “the greatest force for good on this planet,” he said at a Westside gathering Thursday night. “I'm an unabashed, complete free-enterprise capitalist enthusiast,” he said. “I see business as fundamentally heroic … [but] it could be so much better.” Mackey is about a quarter of the way through a tour to promote his first book “Conscious Capitalism,” which he co-wrote with Raj Sisodia.
Advertisement
SPORTS
October 25, 1992 | HAL BOCK, ASSOCIATED PRESS
On Nov. 12 in Minneapolis, judge David Doty will consider the application of 600 or so NFL players to become free agents. Their contracts expire Feb. 1 and given the recent climate of the court--four players were set free in September--the latest litigants are cautiously optimistic. John Mackey never thought it would come to this. Mackey is the Patrick Henry of the NFL, the first guy with the gumption to stand up to the league and demand some things, resulting in . . . shhh, not so loud . . .
BUSINESS
January 17, 2013 | By Tiffany Hsu
Using “fascism” to describe President Obama's healthcare reform was “poor use of an emotionally charged word,” according to John Mackey, co-chief executive and co-founder of Whole Foods Market. In a blog post Thursday, Mackey said he “definitely” regrets using the term, which “today stirs up too much negative emotion with its horrific associations in the 20th century.” The mea culpa came amid a surge of criticism after Mackey's interview earlier this week with NPR, in which he said that Obama's policies are “technically speaking … more like fascism” instead of socialism.
SPORTS
January 11, 1991 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Former Ram Jack Youngblood; Bob Brown, who played for the Rams and the Raiders; L.C. Greenwood, and Lynn Swann head the list of 15 final nominees for induction into the Pro Football Hall of Fame Jan. 26. Also nominated: Earl Campbell, John Riggins, John Hannah, Jan Stenerud, Lem Barney, Carl Eller, John Mackey, Stan Jones and Ken Stabler. Non-players being considered are Raider owner Al Davis and Tex Schramm.
BUSINESS
January 17, 2013 | By Tiffany Hsu
Using “fascism” to describe President Obama's healthcare reform was “poor use of an emotionally charged word,” according to John Mackey, co-chief executive and co-founder of Whole Foods Market. In a blog post Thursday, Mackey said he “definitely” regrets using the term, which “today stirs up too much negative emotion with its horrific associations in the 20th century.” The mea culpa came amid a surge of criticism after Mackey's interview earlier this week with NPR, in which he said that Obama's policies are “technically speaking … more like fascism” instead of socialism.
SPORTS
August 2, 1992 | BOB OATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rainstorms have been drenching northeastern Ohio for a month. The Canton area took more than 11 inches of rain in July--within half an inch of the record for the month--and Friday it poured again. But when Raider owner Al Davis got up Saturday morning and headed for the Pro Football Hall of Fame, there wasn't a cloud in sight. "That was no coincidence," a friend said. "It didn't dare rain on Al."
BUSINESS
January 25, 2013 | By Tiffany Hsu
Business, says Whole Foods co-Chief Executive John Mackey, has “a horrible reputation.” But instead of being “selfish and greedy and exploitative,” as it's often portrayed, business is actually “the greatest force for good on this planet,” he said at a Westside gathering Thursday night. “I'm an unabashed, complete free-enterprise capitalist enthusiast,” he said. “I see business as fundamentally heroic … [but] it could be so much better.” Mackey is about a quarter of the way through a tour to promote his first book “Conscious Capitalism,” which he co-wrote with Raj Sisodia.
BUSINESS
May 13, 1993 | JILL BETTNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mrs. Gooch's Natural Food Markets, based in Sherman Oaks, said Wednesday that it agreed to be acquired by Whole Foods Market Inc. in a $56-million stock deal that merges the nation's two biggest natural-food supermarket chains. Whole Foods, based in Austin, Tex., has 22 stores in Texas and five other states. In fiscal 1992, it reportedly earned $3.1 million on sales of about $120 million. Privately owned Mrs.
SPORTS
November 6, 2001
How NFL greats fared after changing teams at the ends of their careers: 1. Johnny Unitas 3 touchdown passes, 7 interceptions (1974 Chargers) 2. Don Maynard Caught one pass, 18 yards (1973 Cardinals) 3. Marion Motley Gained 8 yards (1955 Steelers) 4. John Mackey Caught 11 passes, 110 yards (1972 Chargers) 5. Franco Harris Gained 170 yards (1984 Seahawks) 6. Joe Namath 3 touchdown passes, 5 interceptions (1977 Rams) Source: World Features Syndicate
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 8, 2011 | By Sam Farmer, Los Angeles Times
John Mackey, who helped revolutionize the NFL's tight end position and whose post-football struggles with dementia became emblematic of the brutality of the game, has died. He was 69. Mackey died Wednesday in Baltimore after a 10-year battle with frontal temporal dementia, the Baltimore Sun reported. A former president of the NFL Players Assn., Mackey spent 10 seasons with the Baltimore Colts and San Diego Chargers, catching 331 passes for 5,236 yards and 38 touchdowns — including a 75-yard score on a tipped ball to help lift the Colts over the Dallas Cowboys in Super Bowl V in 1971.
SPORTS
October 25, 1992 | HAL BOCK, ASSOCIATED PRESS
On Nov. 12 in Minneapolis, judge David Doty will consider the application of 600 or so NFL players to become free agents. Their contracts expire Feb. 1 and given the recent climate of the court--four players were set free in September--the latest litigants are cautiously optimistic. John Mackey never thought it would come to this. Mackey is the Patrick Henry of the NFL, the first guy with the gumption to stand up to the league and demand some things, resulting in . . . shhh, not so loud . . .
SPORTS
August 2, 1992 | BOB OATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rainstorms have been drenching northeastern Ohio for a month. The Canton area took more than 11 inches of rain in July--within half an inch of the record for the month--and Friday it poured again. But when Raider owner Al Davis got up Saturday morning and headed for the Pro Football Hall of Fame, there wasn't a cloud in sight. "That was no coincidence," a friend said. "It didn't dare rain on Al."
SPORTS
January 11, 1991 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Former Ram Jack Youngblood; Bob Brown, who played for the Rams and the Raiders; L.C. Greenwood, and Lynn Swann head the list of 15 final nominees for induction into the Pro Football Hall of Fame Jan. 26. Also nominated: Earl Campbell, John Riggins, John Hannah, Jan Stenerud, Lem Barney, Carl Eller, John Mackey, Stan Jones and Ken Stabler. Non-players being considered are Raider owner Al Davis and Tex Schramm.
BUSINESS
July 18, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Services
Whole Foods Market Inc. said the Securities and Exchange Commission was conducting an inquiry into Web postings about the company, whose chief executive apologized to shareholders for his anonymous posts on financial message boards. The natural and organic grocer also said its board of directors formed a committee to investigate the postings.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|