Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJohn Maher
IN THE NEWS

John Maher

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
January 31, 1988 | WILLIAM OVEREND, Times Staff Writer
He was a junkie and a child alcoholic--but he whipped his problems, then set about helping other addicts do the same. With charm and a brash wit, he built a drug rehabilitation program that brought him celebrity status and a hero's image. Then, suddenly, the booze was back. Now, John Maher is determined to stay sober--and trying to rebuild his life.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
January 3, 1996 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Great Western Financial Corp. has officially handed over its reins to a new chief executive, but the new boss sees little change in basic direction for the parent of Great Western Bank. On Monday, the CEO job officially passed from James F. Montgomery, a savvy thrift industry fixture who personified the Chatsworth-based company's Old West image, to John F. Maher, an investment banker who helped design the firm's push into banking services.
Advertisement
NEWS
December 4, 1988 | WILLIAM OVEREND, Times Staff Writer
John Maher, the founder of a San Francisco-based drug-rehabilitation program called the Delancey Street Foundation, died Saturday at his mother's home in New York City, according to friends. He was 48. A former New York street hoodlum and child heroin addict, Maher had turned his own life around after coming to Los Angeles in the late 1960s and becoming a member of Synanon, one of the nation's pioneering recovery programs for drug addicts.
BUSINESS
April 26, 1995 | THOMAS S. MULLIGAN
Great Western Financial Corp., parent of the nation's second-largest savings and loan, signaled its executive succession plans Tuesday by naming John F. Maher chief executive, effective at year end. Maher, 51, a former investment banker, has been president and chief operating officer since 1986. James F. Montgomery, 60, current chairman and chief executive, will retain the chairman's post.
BOOKS
May 20, 1990 | CHARLES SOLOMON
Michael Toms, the host of New Dimensions Radio, conducted these interviews with Joseph Campell, the noted scholar of mythology and anthropology, over a ten-year period. Campbell argues that myths contain psychological elements that are essential to the development of the individual, but debunks many false notions about the importance and origins mythology.
BUSINESS
April 26, 1995 | THOMAS S. MULLIGAN
Great Western Financial Corp., parent of the nation's second-largest savings and loan, signaled its executive succession plans Tuesday by naming John F. Maher chief executive, effective at year end. Maher, 51, a former investment banker, has been president and chief operating officer since 1986. James F. Montgomery, 60, current chairman and chief executive, will retain the chairman's post.
BUSINESS
January 3, 1996 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Great Western Financial Corp. has officially handed over its reins to a new chief executive, but the new boss sees little change in basic direction for the parent of Great Western Bank. On Monday, the CEO job officially passed from James F. Montgomery, a savvy thrift industry fixture who personified the Chatsworth-based company's Old West image, to John F. Maher, an investment banker who helped design the firm's push into banking services.
BUSINESS
September 24, 1986
John F. Maher has been elected to the board of directors of IRT Corp.
BUSINESS
February 24, 2002
"Edison Posts a Profit of $2.2Billion" [Feb. 16] notes that the company had "a massive one-time $2.1-billion gain linked to a pact with state regulators...." Thank you, Gov. Davis. Thank you, California legislators. Thank you, state agency. It is good to know an election is coming up. I hope everyone is paying attention. John Maher Monrovia I see that Edison will pay off its debts by March 1. That being so, then, in April our electric bills should go back to normal.
OPINION
November 18, 2001
Your picture of protest against declining health care benefits for veterans (Nov. 12) depicts a ridiculous situation in California. At the same time we taxpayers are spending $100 million annually for prenatal care for illegal alien mothers-to-be and providing free education, housing, health care and other benefits for hundreds of thousands of foreign nationals who illegally entered this country, we turn our backs on members of the "greatest generation" of...
BOOKS
May 20, 1990 | CHARLES SOLOMON
Michael Toms, the host of New Dimensions Radio, conducted these interviews with Joseph Campell, the noted scholar of mythology and anthropology, over a ten-year period. Campbell argues that myths contain psychological elements that are essential to the development of the individual, but debunks many false notions about the importance and origins mythology.
NEWS
December 4, 1988 | WILLIAM OVEREND, Times Staff Writer
John Maher, the founder of a San Francisco-based drug-rehabilitation program called the Delancey Street Foundation, died Saturday at his mother's home in New York City, according to friends. He was 48. A former New York street hoodlum and child heroin addict, Maher had turned his own life around after coming to Los Angeles in the late 1960s and becoming a member of Synanon, one of the nation's pioneering recovery programs for drug addicts.
NEWS
January 31, 1988 | WILLIAM OVEREND, Times Staff Writer
He was a junkie and a child alcoholic--but he whipped his problems, then set about helping other addicts do the same. With charm and a brash wit, he built a drug rehabilitation program that brought him celebrity status and a hero's image. Then, suddenly, the booze was back. Now, John Maher is determined to stay sober--and trying to rebuild his life.
NEWS
November 17, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
A major general was demoted to colonel for sexual misconduct with the wives of two subordinate officers and an enlisted soldier, the Army said in Washington. Maj. Gen. John J. Maher III, 51, who until October was vice director of operations with the Joint Chiefs of Staff at the Pentagon, was demoted two ranks and will retire from his 29-year career with his annual pension cut from $77,000 to $59,000, the Army said. He was also fined $8,600.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 2004 | From a Times Staff Writer
Grover Sales, a jazz historian and author of "Jazz: America's Classical Music", died Feb. 14 of kidney failure at a hospital in Tiburon, Calif. He was 84. Sales also wrote about jazz for many publications, including book reviews for the Los Angeles Times. He lectured on jazz at Stanford University, San Francisco State University and elsewhere.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|