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John Major

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NEWS
November 27, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
John Major, who was endorsed by Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher as her successor and heir, was elected today as leader of the Conservative Party and will become prime minister. Major fell two votes short of the needed majority, but his opponents conceded defeat and Conservative Party officials declared him elected. Aides said Thatcher is "thrilled." Major, 47, her chancellor of the Exchequer, is the youngest person to be elected Britain's prime minister since the 19th Century.
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NATIONAL
March 21, 2013 | By Lisa Mascaro and Michael A. Memoli, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Sending President Obama a bill Thursday that averts a government shutdown, Congress proved that it can, in fact, function. Not long ago, this was considered an unlikely outcome. Republicans in the House, trying to force Obama to accept deep cuts, had come close to shutting down the government before and appeared primed to do so again. But House Speaker John A. Boehner (R-Ohio) has united his rambunctious majority ever so tenuously around a strategy that, for now, sets aside the cycle of crisis politics to aim for long-range objectives.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 1992
The fiercely fought British general election ended in the wee hours of the Old Country's morning with a rather startling surprise. The Tories have won for the fourth consecutive time. Observers on this side of the Atlantic wonder whether the outcome there is any portent for what might happen here in November. It's understandable that the question would arise. Like the United States, Britain is in the middle of a bad recession, tempers are growing short and fears are growing long.
NEWS
April 15, 2004 | Glenn Adams, Associated Press
Laura Bush joins actors, writers and a former British prime minister in pitching her favorite books for the annual "Who Reads What?" list, out in time for National Library Week.
OPINION
June 20, 1993 | THOMAS PLATE and WILLIAM TUOHY, Thomas Plate is editor of the editorial pages for The Times. William Tuohy is London bureau chief for The Times
A number of hurdles await the visitor to No. 10 Downing Street--as the official residence of Britain's prime minister is known. But most noticeable is the elaborate succession of security checkpoints, tighter than ever in the wake of increased terrorism by the Irish Republican Army.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 1997 | RICHARD PELLS, Richard Pells, a professor of history at the University of Texas at Austin, is the author of "Not Like Us: How Europeans Have Loved, Hated and Transformed American Culture Since World War II" (Basic Books, 1997)
The British are having an election today, but given the way American journalists and pundits covered the campaign, it might as well have been an American election they were talking about. All we heard was how much the British, in their political style, are just like us. Prime Minister John Major was routinely compared to George Bush on the eve of his repudiation by the American electorate in 1992.
NEWS
January 15, 1994 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sex, that traditional despoiler of Conservative Party politicians, is creating yet more scandals threatening Prime Minister John Major's enfeebled government. The running scandals involve sexual, political and financial peccadilloes among Tory politicians, which flatly contradict earnest, upright Major's new policy, dubbed "back to basics"--the British equivalent of the American "family values" campaign in which God, church and family are stressed.
NEWS
November 28, 1990 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John Major, the 47-year-old chancellor of the exchequer who rose out of one of London's toughest neighborhoods and the unemployment line, was selected Tuesday as Britain's next prime minister. Major, whose father was once a circus trapeze artist, was elected leader of the Conservative Party to replace Margaret Thatcher, whose sudden resignation under pressure last week surprised the nation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 1991 | PETER STOTHARD, Peter Stothard is the U . S . editor of The Times of London. and
We British do not think that the Americans are winning the war against Saddam Hussein. We think that "our boys" are. Our French friends have been cautious combatants all along. But now that the air raids are rocking along so well, Francois Mitterrand's formidable heroes (best Parisian pronunciation, please) are leading la liberation de Kuwait. As for the courageous Italians, they cannot wait to drive the beast of Baghdad from his lair.
OPINION
September 27, 1992 | Michael Elliott, Michael Elliott is Washington bureau chief for the Economist
Though the dust is far from settled, enough has happened in Europe in the last two weeks to make at least preliminary judgments on the state of the old Continent necessary. A new order in Western Europe is being established before our eyes. Washington needs to take notice, for friends of America, like John Major's Britain, have seen their position in Europe much weakened.
WORLD
September 29, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
Former British Prime Minister John Major, who campaigned for family values during his administration, shattered his squeaky-clean image by admitting to a four-year affair with a colleague. The affair with a former Cabinet minister, Edwina Currie, predated his tenure. The relationship was revealed in excerpts from Currie's parliamentary diaries in the Times newspaper.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 1997 | RICHARD PELLS, Richard Pells, a professor of history at the University of Texas at Austin, is the author of "Not Like Us: How Europeans Have Loved, Hated and Transformed American Culture Since World War II" (Basic Books, 1997)
The British are having an election today, but given the way American journalists and pundits covered the campaign, it might as well have been an American election they were talking about. All we heard was how much the British, in their political style, are just like us. Prime Minister John Major was routinely compared to George Bush on the eve of his repudiation by the American electorate in 1992.
NEWS
March 18, 1997 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The long-anticipated call to arms finally came on a brilliant spring morning. Wearing a jaunty smile and a pink shirt before the prime minister's front door at 10 Downing St. on Monday, John Major invited Britain to a national election May 1 that is expected to write his political epitaph. After his ritual consultation with Queen Elizabeth II, Major's announcement of the election date ended months of political skirmishing, conjecture and maneuvering.
NEWS
March 1, 1997 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
David Hill, who speaks for the juggernaut Labor Party, basked Friday at the happy junction where partisan analysis merges with conventional wisdom in a country marching toward potentially lopsided national elections. "Every night [Prime Minister] John Major must pray that we make a big mistake," Hill said at a morning-after encounter. "As things stand now, it's his only salvation."
NEWS
January 18, 1997 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ideology is dead, historic differences are blurred, personalities dominate. Sex and sleaze grab bigger headlines than ideas and issues. Sound familiar? Well, this time it is the British who are voting. Not Bill and Bob, but close enough: John and Tony are waging a "presidential-style" election campaign with a strong American accent. The winner, incumbent Conservative John Major or Labor Party challenger Tony Blair, gets a five-year term as prime minister.
NEWS
July 18, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
British Prime Minister John Major had a tense meeting with leaders of Northern Ireland's main Roman Catholic party as he fought to revive a peace process stalled by the worst violence in years. Parliament members from the Social Democratic and Labor Party, leaving Major's Downing Street offices, said they had accused his government of capitulating to pressure from the majority Protestants in the province.
SPORTS
February 6, 1991 | From Staff and Wire Reports
British Prime Minister John Major has called for the lifting of sports sanctions against South Africa in response to South African President Frederik de Klerk's program to abolish apartheid.
NEWS
February 8, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
British Prime Minister John Major stepped up his initiative on Northern Ireland by inviting Albert Reynolds, prime minister-elect of the Irish Republic, to visit Britain for talks later this year. Northern Ireland's Protestant and Catholic politicians have agreed to meet Major next week for the first security summit in 16 years to review a surge in sectarian killings in the British-ruled province.
NEWS
June 22, 1996 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Britain's monthlong diplomatic war of noncooperation with its European Union partners over a ban on the country's beef exports ended Friday when beleaguered British Prime Minister John Major surrendered and accepted terms that met few of his initial demands. "The prime minister has indicated our policy of noncooperation ceases as of now," British Foreign Secretary Malcolm Rifkind told a news conference. "We are now looking forward to working again with our partners."
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