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John Malashock

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September 24, 1988 | LEWIS SEGAL, Times Dance Writer
Somewhere in the second or third Golden Age of Twyla Tharp's modern dance company, John Malashock appeared: a blond, curly-haired, all-American dreamboat who brought devastating efficiency to Tharp's increasingly sardonic depictions of contemporary male-female relationships. Tharp's dancers are disbanded now, with Tharp herself a fixture of American Ballet Theatre, but Malashock is still a virtuoso of manipulation and rejection--this time for his own, new, four-member company in San Diego.
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August 17, 1998 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES DANCE CRITIC
Confused about the new masculinity? Get in line. Some 15 choreographers in two Southland venues showcased male expression over the weekend and only occasionally agreed about who or what a man might be. For "Men of Distinction" in the Keck Theater at Occidental College on Friday, senior dancers sat back and reminisced in pieces high in concept but generally limited in dance action.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 1994 | JANICE STEINBERG, Janice Steinberg is a free-lance dance writer based in San Diego.
John Malashock winced when asked about ambitions he may have for his 5-year-old modern dance company. "That dirty word-- ambition ," said the choreographer and founder of San Diego-based Malashock Dance & Company, which will perform three new works at UCLA on Friday and Saturday. What's so bad about ambition? "There's a difference between ambition and drive," said Malashock, a former Twyla Tharp dancer. "Drive is what forces you to do the work; it's a necessity.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 1996 | LEWIS SEGAL
Although John Malashock makes dances just as restless, sinewy and eclectic as any by his postmodern counterparts, there's also a rugged, heroic beauty to them that links him to the generation of modern dance pioneers. Based in San Diego for the last eight years, this former Tharp dancer brought his accomplished seven-member company to Bovard Auditorium at USC on Tuesday for a three-part program in the early-evening "Spectrum" series.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 1989 | DONNA PERLMUTTER
John Malashock used to be one of Twyla Tharp's vagabonds, a dancer who spent up to 150 days on the road each year. But since 1984, Malashock has resettled in his native San Diego, founding a four-member company and establishing himself as a choreographer. His 3-year-old Malashock Dance & Co. opens Thursday at the Lyceum Space in San Diego for four nights. The company is also set to perform in July at Dance Kaleidoscope in Los Angeles. Malashock's reasons for leaving Tharp were many.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 1995 | Lewis Segal
San Diego-based modern dancer- choreographer John Malashock has found a measure of security in these recessionary times. After seven years, his six-member company works with the San Diego Symphony and that city's PBS station on high-profile projects and has become a resident institution at the Old Globe Theatre in Balboa Park. Malashock is currently dancing the full-evening "Broad Waters" at the Old Globe.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 1996 | LEWIS SEGAL
Although John Malashock makes dances just as restless, sinewy and eclectic as any by his postmodern counterparts, there's also a rugged, heroic beauty to them that links him to the generation of modern dance pioneers. Based in San Diego for the last eight years, this former Tharp dancer brought his accomplished seven-member company to Bovard Auditorium at USC on Tuesday for a three-part program in the early-evening "Spectrum" series.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 1989 | LEWIS SEGAL
Former Tharp dancer John Malashock choreographs as if each piece were his last. Even when his ideas are all over the map--as they are in his new 25-minute quartet, "Departure of the Youngsters"--Malashock's sense of creative brinkmanship generates excitement. And the dancing itself swoops and lunges with enormous force from one unsparing confrontation to another. Introduced Thursday at the Lyceum Space in Horton Plaza on a program of otherwise familiar works, "Departure" focuses on the outcasts of society, with mime and gesture motifs that suggest drug addicts and the homeless as well as the physically handicapped and mentally ill. Malashock identifies fiercely with their pain but, most of all, his piece seems to be about power and manipulation.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 1992 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES DANCE WRITER
Whether he's experimenting with narrative or expressing his feelings about music, choreographer John Malashock always creates a feverish sense of disintegration. Trust him to show the fatal flaw, the canker in the rose, the process of destruction hidden within an illusion of wholeness. At Cal State Long Beach on Tuesday, this former Twyla Tharp dancer presented his accomplished, five-member, San Diego-based modern-dance ensemble in three works from 1991.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 1990 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES DANCE WRITER
There's a moment in several John Malashock dance dramas when people grab their upturned arms or wrists as if checking an alarming pulse--afraid that the force of unbearable pain might burst out of their bodies at any instant. And of course it does--in dancing of the deepest, rawest emotion, dancing in which Malashock's cast and audience are swept into the same vortex.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 1995 | Lewis Segal
San Diego-based modern dancer- choreographer John Malashock has found a measure of security in these recessionary times. After seven years, his six-member company works with the San Diego Symphony and that city's PBS station on high-profile projects and has become a resident institution at the Old Globe Theatre in Balboa Park. Malashock is currently dancing the full-evening "Broad Waters" at the Old Globe.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 1994 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES DANCE WRITER
Just before launching a program of new works, Friday in Schoenberg Hall at UCLA, choreographer John Malashock spoke to the audience about the unpredictability of live performance, supplying examples from his former career as a dancer with Twyla Tharp. As it happened, the final work in the three-part event added an ironic new anecdote to his collection.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 1994 | JANICE STEINBERG, Janice Steinberg is a free-lance dance writer based in San Diego.
John Malashock winced when asked about ambitions he may have for his 5-year-old modern dance company. "That dirty word-- ambition ," said the choreographer and founder of San Diego-based Malashock Dance & Company, which will perform three new works at UCLA on Friday and Saturday. What's so bad about ambition? "There's a difference between ambition and drive," said Malashock, a former Twyla Tharp dancer. "Drive is what forces you to do the work; it's a necessity.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 1992 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES DANCE WRITER
Whether he's experimenting with narrative or expressing his feelings about music, choreographer John Malashock always creates a feverish sense of disintegration. Trust him to show the fatal flaw, the canker in the rose, the process of destruction hidden within an illusion of wholeness. At Cal State Long Beach on Tuesday, this former Twyla Tharp dancer presented his accomplished, five-member, San Diego-based modern-dance ensemble in three works from 1991.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 1990 | JAN BRESLAUER
A leggy Adonis with blond cherub curls lunges and turns, as two athletic women vie for his attention. He looks away toward the horizon and a waifish woman hurls herself up onto his back in a tortured plea for communion. Sounds like just another day in the life of a So Cal lifeguard, right? Not quite, although the leading man does look the part.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 1990 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES DANCE WRITER
There's a moment in several John Malashock dance dramas when people grab their upturned arms or wrists as if checking an alarming pulse--afraid that the force of unbearable pain might burst out of their bodies at any instant. And of course it does--in dancing of the deepest, rawest emotion, dancing in which Malashock's cast and audience are swept into the same vortex.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 1994 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES DANCE WRITER
Just before launching a program of new works, Friday in Schoenberg Hall at UCLA, choreographer John Malashock spoke to the audience about the unpredictability of live performance, supplying examples from his former career as a dancer with Twyla Tharp. As it happened, the final work in the three-part event added an ironic new anecdote to his collection.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 1990 | JAN BRESLAUER
A leggy Adonis with blond cherub curls lunges and turns, as two athletic women vie for his attention. He looks away toward the horizon and a waifish woman hurls herself up onto his back in a tortured plea for communion. Sounds like just another day in the life of a So Cal lifeguard, right? Not quite, although the leading man does look the part.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 1990 | JAN BRESLAUER
A leggy Adonis with blond cherub curls lunges and turns, as two athletic women vie for his attention. He looks away toward the horizon and a waifish woman hurls herself up onto his back in a tortured plea for communion. Sounds like just another day in the life of a So Cal lifeguard, right? Not quite, although the leading man does look the part.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 1989 | LEWIS SEGAL
Former Tharp dancer John Malashock choreographs as if each piece were his last. Even when his ideas are all over the map--as they are in his new 25-minute quartet, "Departure of the Youngsters"--Malashock's sense of creative brinkmanship generates excitement. And the dancing itself swoops and lunges with enormous force from one unsparing confrontation to another. Introduced Thursday at the Lyceum Space in Horton Plaza on a program of otherwise familiar works, "Departure" focuses on the outcasts of society, with mime and gesture motifs that suggest drug addicts and the homeless as well as the physically handicapped and mentally ill. Malashock identifies fiercely with their pain but, most of all, his piece seems to be about power and manipulation.
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