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John Malkovich

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BUSINESS
May 24, 2012 | By Michelle Maltais
In a new ad, the voice of iPhone 4S meets the embodiment of all things eerie and slightly off-kilter - John Malkovich. Really and truly, the ad made me nervous for Siri. Typically scenes that start with the "Un bel dì vedremo" aria from Puccini's "Madame Butterfly" echoing through the room (think "Fatal Attraction"), Malkovich sipping coffee and asking one-word questions while exhaling audibly usually don't end well for the others in them. I know most of us who have seen "Being John Malkovich" hope Siri answers his single-word queries with "Malkovich, Malkovich, Malkovich, Malkovich.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2014 | By Patrick Kevin Day
Stephen Colbert embraced his inner conservative attack dog when he interviewed actor John Malkovich on his show Tuesday night. Malkovich stars in the new biopic "Cesar Chavez" as the owner of a large industrial grape farm who doesn't take kindly to Chavez's attempts to unionize farm workers. Naturally, in Colbert's eyes, Malkovich is playing the hero. "It's difficult for me to think of someone who can call Richard Nixon on the phone as a hero," Malkovich replied. PHOTOS: Celebrities by The Times "It wasn't enough for [Chavez and the workers]
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 2012 | By Robert Abele
If "Drunkboat" understands anything, it's the louche intensity with which John Malkovich commands a frame, whether staring into space with a cigarette or teetering under the influence of Cutty Sark. In most other respects, though, this self-consciously mannered indie fails to ignite. Adapted by co-writer/director Bob Meyer from his own autobiographical play, the story drops Malkovich's reformed-drunk Vietnam vet Mort at the suburban house of his long-estranged widower sister (Dana Delany)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 2013 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
The new action spy thriller "Red 2" starring Bruce Willis, John Malkovich, Mary-Louise Parker and Helen Mirren opens at a Costco. The only action at the moment is a shopping cart with a bum wheel. A heated discussion about backyard grills and power sprays is underway. Until a box, a bomb and an old spy on Aisle 3 threaten to upset this banal scene. It's official, the retired and extremely dangerous - a.k.a. RED - crew of aging international spies is back for another round of AARP-style havoc.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 2012 | By Dennis Lim, Special to the Los Angeles Times
One of the greatest first films in all of American cinema, "Being John Malkovich" (1999) introduced audiences to Spike Jonze and Charlie Kaufman, two of the most distinctive voices in contemporary movies. A mad scramble of surrealist tropes and philosophical ideas, it marked the acme of Hollywood's passing interest in existentialist postmodernism, which manifested itself through the '90s in such meta-movies as"Groundhog Day,""The Truman Show" and"The Matrix. " Thirteen years on, "Being John Malkovich" - which the Criterion Collection is releasing on DVD andBlu-raythis week - has lost none of its lunatic charm.
MAGAZINE
April 13, 2003 | --HEATHER JOHN
Being John Malkovich has always meant dressing with verve. Sometimes it means wearing other people's clothes--the 50-year-old actor has modeled for Comme des Garcons and Yohji Yamamoto--and other times it means wearing your own. That's right, Malkovich has launched his own fashion and design consulting firm, Mrs. Mudd--a companion to his film production company, Mr. Mudd--which has just produced its first John Malkovich menswear collection. It's no surprise, really.
BUSINESS
November 30, 1999 | CLAUDIA ELLER
On April 22, 1998, something truly amazing happened. A large movie company actually agreed to finance "Being John Malkovich"--one of the most inventive and unlikely movies Hollywood has ever produced. Five weeks into its run, the quirky $10-million satire remains one of the most-talked-about movies in theaters and continues to raise the question of how it ever got made.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 1999 | JAN STUART, NEWSDAY
The Oscar nominating committees huddle behind closed doors. There is much wringing of hands, pounding of foreheads. "Do we have a category for least likely screenplay to see the light of day?" "How about best performance by an actor playing some cockamamie notion of himself?" "Can we do a special Who's Afraid of Elizabeth Taylor prize for most de-glamorized use of Cameron Diaz?"
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 1987 | BARBARA ISENBERG
This is Calendar's third annual listing of Taste Makers, individuals who have brought a distinct focus to 1987 and who we feel will continue to influence the world of arts and entertainment long after this year passes. They were selected not so much for specific contributions in their respective fields but because they are clearly creative forces who move and shape taste. They were interviewed to find out what kinds of influences have moved and shaped them.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 1999 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
"Being John Malkovich" is a clever and outrageous piece of whimsical fantasy that is unique, unpredictable and more than a little strange. You could see a lot of movies over a lot of years and not hear a line of dialogue as playful and bizarre as "I'll see you in Malkovich in one hour." What the heck is going on here?
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 2012 | By Robert Abele
If "Drunkboat" understands anything, it's the louche intensity with which John Malkovich commands a frame, whether staring into space with a cigarette or teetering under the influence of Cutty Sark. In most other respects, though, this self-consciously mannered indie fails to ignite. Adapted by co-writer/director Bob Meyer from his own autobiographical play, the story drops Malkovich's reformed-drunk Vietnam vet Mort at the suburban house of his long-estranged widower sister (Dana Delany)
BUSINESS
May 24, 2012 | By Michelle Maltais
In a new ad, the voice of iPhone 4S meets the embodiment of all things eerie and slightly off-kilter - John Malkovich. Really and truly, the ad made me nervous for Siri. Typically scenes that start with the "Un bel dì vedremo" aria from Puccini's "Madame Butterfly" echoing through the room (think "Fatal Attraction"), Malkovich sipping coffee and asking one-word questions while exhaling audibly usually don't end well for the others in them. I know most of us who have seen "Being John Malkovich" hope Siri answers his single-word queries with "Malkovich, Malkovich, Malkovich, Malkovich.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 2012 | By Dennis Lim, Special to the Los Angeles Times
One of the greatest first films in all of American cinema, "Being John Malkovich" (1999) introduced audiences to Spike Jonze and Charlie Kaufman, two of the most distinctive voices in contemporary movies. A mad scramble of surrealist tropes and philosophical ideas, it marked the acme of Hollywood's passing interest in existentialist postmodernism, which manifested itself through the '90s in such meta-movies as"Groundhog Day,""The Truman Show" and"The Matrix. " Thirteen years on, "Being John Malkovich" - which the Criterion Collection is releasing on DVD andBlu-raythis week - has lost none of its lunatic charm.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2012 | By Emily Rome
A star-studded screening of "The Raven" wouldn't be quite complete without a few dark, mood-setting touches - including a real raven. Yes, there was a large, black bird on the carpet at the film's special screening downtown Monday. Many celebrities kept their distance as they neared the bird, but not John Cusack, who braved allowing the raven to perch on his arm. At the event, the ornate auditorium of the Los Angeles Theatre was decked out with candles, red lighting, lanterns for the ushers and some fog machine magic.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 2010 | Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
There are few truths to be found in the smoldering ash heap that is "Jonah Hex," but here are the ones that matter: John Malkovich is responsible for the Fourth of July fireworks tradition (who knew?); Megan Fox looks better fighting in a bustier than tight white "Transformers" jeans (no-brainer); definitely consider a cosmetic surgeon to deal with those unsightly facial scars, don't get in a pique and try to do it yourself (duh). This latest DC Comics transmogrification into mega-action mess stars Josh Brolin as Jonah, a bounty-hunting latter-day saint with an ax to grind and a face that even a mother couldn't love (see cosmetic surgery tip above)
BUSINESS
April 2, 2010 | Bloomberg News
Actor John Malkovich is seeking to recover $2.3 million from an account he had with the securities firm of Bernard Madoff, who conducted the biggest Ponzi scheme in U.S. history. Irving Picard, the trustee liquidating Madoff's firm, in August approved a claim for $670,000 for the actor's pension plan and trust, more than $1.5 million short of the value of the securities in Malkovich's account listed on his November 2008 final statement, attorneys for the actor said in a filing Thursday in U.S. Bankruptcy Court in New York.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2003 | Irene Lacher, Special to The Times
Both of John Malkovich's business enterprises are named after Mr. Mudd, the man who drove him and Julian Sands to the dusty Thai set of "The Killing Fields" 20 years ago. People had told them that Mr. Mudd was a murderer, so one day Malkovich and Sands decided to ask their driver about his past. Mr. Mudd peered at them in the rear-view mirror, and after what seemed like a long time, he spoke. "Sometimes Mr. Mudd kill," he said. "Sometimes Mr. Mudd not kill."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 1993 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
Used to be that all a hero needed to operate was a weapon, a partner and a code of honor, with maybe a good woman thrown into the mix. In these more uncertain times, however, a hero is hardly worth saluting without a villain of stature on the other side, standing mockingly in his path and matching him strength for strength. And when the hero is played by Clint Eastwood, this requirement becomes even more critical.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 2009 | Gary Goldstein
Director Steve Jacobs and his screenwriter wife Anna-Maria Monticelli's respectful -- and respectable -- adaptation of J.M. Coetzee's Booker Prize-winning 1999 novel, "Disgrace," proves a double-edged sword. Although the pair has obviously taken pains to stay true to the author's structure, tone and purpose, their fidelity results in a film that's absorbing but often bloodless and, frankly, depressing. There's no arguing, however, that Jacobs and Monticelli have approached their challenging source material with a clear and committed cinematic vision.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 2009 | BETSY SHARKEY, FILM CRITIC
"The Great Buck Howard," an affectionate though flawed comedy, stars John Malkovich as a mentalist who once charmed audiences with his logic-defying ability to read minds or hypnotize volunteers plucked from the audience. At his peak, Buck filled venues around the country and appeared 61 times on "The Tonight Show" in the Johnny Carson era. But that was then.
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