Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJohn Maloney
IN THE NEWS

John Maloney

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 7, 1996
John J. Maloney of Thousand Oaks, president of Marathon National Bank in Los Angeles, died of leukemia Monday at UCLA Medical Center. He was 52. Maloney was born June 19, 1944, in Youngstown, Ohio. He moved to Ventura County with his family 15 years ago. "He was a considerate father and husband, and devoted time to both his family and his professional life," said his son, Michael. John Maloney attended UC Riverside and UCLA.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
February 6, 2008
Re "Bid to cut L.A. car fleet a no-go for some," Feb. 3 "It would be a dereliction of our duties to take a step back," City Councilwoman Jan Perry said about the proposal to take away the fuel-efficient vehicles provided to city employees. Why not resell or release them to local citizens who want the same fuel-efficient vehicles but cannot afford new ones? The same environmental results will occur, just with different drivers. City employees could take public transportation and spend the commute time to get to know those they serve.
Advertisement
OPINION
February 6, 2008
Re "Bid to cut L.A. car fleet a no-go for some," Feb. 3 "It would be a dereliction of our duties to take a step back," City Councilwoman Jan Perry said about the proposal to take away the fuel-efficient vehicles provided to city employees. Why not resell or release them to local citizens who want the same fuel-efficient vehicles but cannot afford new ones? The same environmental results will occur, just with different drivers. City employees could take public transportation and spend the commute time to get to know those they serve.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 2006 | Tony Perry, Times Staff Writer
Last spring Capt. John Maloney led his Marines on a mission of mercy through the dangerous streets of Ramadi, Iraq, to take medical supplies to a struggling hospital. Maloney's Marines and a squad of Army soldiers guided a slow-moving convoy through streets infested with snipers and hidden bombs to deliver more than $500,000 worth of supplies -- bandages, bedsheets, heart monitors, antibiotics, incubators and more -- to the Ramadi Maternity and Children's Hospital.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 1992
John (Jack) L. Maloney, who owned Maloney's Stationers, has died at his Northridge home. He was 64. Maloney died Tuesday of complications of an aneurysm, said his son, Dennis Maloney of Malibu. Born in Newton, Mass., Maloney served in the Navy during World War II. After graduating from Boston Fisher Business School in 1948, Maloney came to California and worked as a salesman for Carter Ink Co. In 1950, he was hired as a salesman by Bush's Stationers and later became general manager.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 2006 | Tony Perry, Times Staff Writer
Last spring Capt. John Maloney led his Marines on a mission of mercy through the dangerous streets of Ramadi, Iraq, to take medical supplies to a struggling hospital. Maloney's Marines and a squad of Army soldiers guided a slow-moving convoy through streets infested with snipers and hidden bombs to deliver more than $500,000 worth of supplies -- bandages, bedsheets, heart monitors, antibiotics, incubators and more -- to the Ramadi Maternity and Children's Hospital.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 2001
I find it puzzling that Republicans (and Rep. Gary Condit, D-Ceres) are so eager to funnel tax funds to tax-exempt religious organizations (July 20). If this unconstitutional bill passes, I propose counter-legislation to tax the property, income and activities of all religious organizations. I am weary of self-proclaimed "preachers" and storefront churches operating as tax dodges. John Maloney Anaheim
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 1997 | DADE HAYES
The City Council on Friday extended by 60 days a $25,000 reward for clues in a mystifying 4-month-old murder case. Peter John Maloney, 37, was shot and killed Jan. 10 after picking up groceries at a Trader Joe's store in Toluca Lake. Police said his assailant rode off on a yellow 10-speed bicycle, having taken nothing from the North Hollywood victim. With their investigation stalled, police announced the $25,000 reward two weeks after the shooting.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 26, 2001
While "Operation Infinite Justice" was a bad cover name for our fight against terrorism, "Operation Enduring Freedom" is worse. It is unfortunate that the PR folks have gotten hold of the development of public code names ever since the 1989 "Just Cause" invasion of Panama. But if the name has to convey a message, at least make it a clear one. "Enduring Freedom" sounds like freedom is something that has to be patiently tolerated, rather than a cherished human right. John Maloney Anaheim In lieu of Operation Infinite Justice, how about Operation Hide and Seek?
NEWS
February 10, 1986
A state board revoked the licenses of a contractor who installed fire sprinklers that were not attached to a water supply in a Monterey school chapel. The Contractors State License Board took away two licenses issued to Dennis W. Frye of Fair Oaks, a Sacramento suburb.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 7, 1996
John J. Maloney of Thousand Oaks, president of Marathon National Bank in Los Angeles, died of leukemia Monday at UCLA Medical Center. He was 52. Maloney was born June 19, 1944, in Youngstown, Ohio. He moved to Ventura County with his family 15 years ago. "He was a considerate father and husband, and devoted time to both his family and his professional life," said his son, Michael. John Maloney attended UC Riverside and UCLA.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 1992
John (Jack) L. Maloney, who owned Maloney's Stationers, has died at his Northridge home. He was 64. Maloney died Tuesday of complications of an aneurysm, said his son, Dennis Maloney of Malibu. Born in Newton, Mass., Maloney served in the Navy during World War II. After graduating from Boston Fisher Business School in 1948, Maloney came to California and worked as a salesman for Carter Ink Co. In 1950, he was hired as a salesman by Bush's Stationers and later became general manager.
OPINION
October 31, 2004
The additional Amtrak service along the Orange County corridor is welcome (Oct. 26), but after reading the specific times and directions, I do not understand what unmet needs will be served. A new southbound train leaving Union Station at 12:15 p.m.? Fine, but what is lacking on this heavily used route is a southbound train leaving Los Angeles after 11 p.m. so customers can attend concerts, plays and other evening performances and not be forced to drive their cars. Currently, the last southbound train from Union Station leaves at 10:10 p.m.; too early for patrons to get to the station after an evening's entertainment.
HOME & GARDEN
May 1, 2003
Thank you for the wonderful article on gardens and their influence on Southern California ("Where the World Is Abloom," April 24). Our lush and varied landscapes, both public and private, are a true joy of living here. There are two areas, though, where I believe our gardening heritage is being challenged: the ever-encroaching "topiary" style as a result of trimming shrubs by power tools and the overuse of palms in public landscapes. How often has one seen a group of New Zealand flax after they've been given a flattop by a hedge trimmer?
Los Angeles Times Articles
|