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John Mantley

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 18, 2003 | Dennis McLellan, Times Staff Writer
John Mantley, who oversaw Doc, Festus, Matt and Kitty as executive producer of "Gunsmoke" during the landmark TV western's final decade, has died. He was 82. Mantley, who had Alzheimer's disease, died Tuesday at his home in Sherman Oaks, said his daughter, Maria Marill.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 18, 2003 | Dennis McLellan, Times Staff Writer
John Mantley, who oversaw Doc, Festus, Matt and Kitty as executive producer of "Gunsmoke" during the landmark TV western's final decade, has died. He was 82. Mantley, who had Alzheimer's disease, died Tuesday at his home in Sherman Oaks, said his daughter, Maria Marill.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 1991 | DAVID J. FOX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a court decision that may have a broad impact for the rights of producers and creators in dealing with major studios, Warner Bros. will have to pay television producer John Mantley $1.46 million, plus interest, for fraudulently squeezing him out of a movie project. In a decision revealed this week, a three-judge panel of the California State Court of Appeal upheld a 1989 verdict reached by a Los Angeles Superior Court jury against Warner Bros.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 1991 | DAVID J. FOX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a court decision that may have a broad impact for the rights of producers and creators in dealing with major studios, Warner Bros. will have to pay television producer John Mantley $1.46 million, plus interest, for fraudulently squeezing him out of a movie project. In a decision revealed this week, a three-judge panel of the California State Court of Appeal upheld a 1989 verdict reached by a Los Angeles Superior Court jury against Warner Bros.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 1989 | NINA J. EASTON, Times Staff Writer
A Los Angeles Superior Court jury this week awarded a producer nearly $1.6 million in damages after he claimed that Warner Bros. fraudulently squeezed him out of a science-fiction movie project he brought to the studio in 1977. The verdict, if upheld, could provide a new legal avenue for producers, directors and actors to challenge studios that remove them from film projects under widely used "pay-or-play" contract clauses.
NEWS
October 28, 1990 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Git along little doggies. Pardner, if you love Westerns, mosey on over to TNT. Every Saturday from 5 to 8a.m., the cable network airs three vintage horse operas. Kicking off the morning is The Travels of Jaimie McPheeters, a Western adventureseries based on Robert Lewis Taylor's 1958 Pulitzer Prize-winning novel of thesame name. The series aired Sundays on ABC September, 1963-March, 1964.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 2001 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Daniel C. Rosenberg, a television actor and prominent lawyer who won multimillion-dollar and precedent-setting verdicts for "Cagney and Lacey" co-producer Mace Neufeld and others, has died. He was 44. Rosenberg died Tuesday at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center of complications from surgery, his family said. The son of film producer Frank P. Rosenberg, whose motion pictures included "One-Eyed Jacks" starring Marlon Brando, Rosenberg always loved the entertainment business.
NEWS
September 14, 1988 | Jack Smith
My confession that my wife and I are beginning to vegetate before our television set has brought numerous confessions from readers who fear a similar degeneration. "You diagnosed my problem with 100% accuracy!" writes Norma Jones of Encinitas in a letter reflecting the sentiments of several others. My reminiscence about "Gunsmoke," and the moral lessons our two sons used to draw from it brings a nostalgic sigh from John Mantley, who produced that "grand old show" for more than a decade.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 1988 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, Times Arts Editor
Society waited a destructively long time before it realized that movies, no less than cave paintings or 11th-Century icons, were worth preserving as part of our cultural heritage. Luckily, television was still young when the urge to preserve took effect. Even so, some of television's earliest hours are only memory. But much of it has been saved, unlike the thousands of films, both silent and sound, of which no scrap now remains. The question is, when you have preserved, what then?
NEWS
February 5, 1988 | BURT A. FOLKART, Times Staff Writer
Ron Bishop, a maverick war hero, outdoorsman and conservationist widely praised in the television world for the authentic and symbolistic writing he brought to dozens of episodic Westerns, has died. He was 66 and his daughter, Roni, said the one-time professional athlete had died Saturday at a Santa Monica hospital of the complications of a stroke. His wife, Pat, and two other daughters were with him when he died, she added.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 1989 | NINA J. EASTON, Times Staff Writer
A Los Angeles Superior Court jury this week awarded a producer nearly $1.6 million in damages after he claimed that Warner Bros. fraudulently squeezed him out of a science-fiction movie project he brought to the studio in 1977. The verdict, if upheld, could provide a new legal avenue for producers, directors and actors to challenge studios that remove them from film projects under widely used "pay-or-play" contract clauses.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 1998 | SHAUNA SNOW
TV & MOVIES No TV at the Oscars: The Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences has altered its rules to prohibit shows intended for episodic television from competing for Oscars. The move follows the 1997 victory in the live-action short category by "Dear Diary," a DreamWorks TV pilot starring Bebe Neuwirth that was given a brief theatrical run after being passed over by the networks.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 1991 | RICK DU BROW
CBS has discovered the comfort zone of war-weary television viewers. Easy-to-take specials with Glenn Close and Cher, along with agreeable series such as "Murder, She Wrote" and "Murphy Brown," have not only given temporary relaxation to CBS audiences but also lifted fortunes at the last-place network. Ratings for the February sweeps--which help set ad rates for stations--actually showed CBS ahead at midweek, although all of the Big Three networks were bunching up again.
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