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John Marino

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August 11, 1989 | STEVE LOWERY, Times Staff Writer
Somewhere in New Jersey, John Marino, a bowlegged ex-baseball catcher with a bad back, climbed off a bike and onto a choice piece of Garden State pavement. After riding across an entire country, and just 60 miles short of his destination--New York City Hall--he had discovered that his attempt to break the transcontinental record he had set the year before had failed. Demoralized, dehydrated, degraded and not at all happy, he found he couldn't pedal another foot.
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SPORTS
July 27, 1991 | ELLIOTT TEAFORD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The meeting the day before the start of the Race Across America is always a raucous affair. John Marino makes sure of it. For three hours he instructs, lectures, cheerleads and laughs with the long-distance cyclists, their families and friends, gathered in a ballroom at an Irvine hotel. The ride is always torture. There is no easy way to pedal cross-country, no matter how much sleep you get along the way, and the riders don't get much. At 2 a.m.
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SPORTS
July 27, 1991 | ELLIOTT TEAFORD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The meeting the day before the start of the Race Across America is always a raucous affair. John Marino makes sure of it. For three hours he instructs, lectures, cheerleads and laughs with the long-distance cyclists, their families and friends, gathered in a ballroom at an Irvine hotel. The ride is always torture. There is no easy way to pedal cross-country, no matter how much sleep you get along the way, and the riders don't get much. At 2 a.m.
SPORTS
August 11, 1989 | STEVE LOWERY, Times Staff Writer
Somewhere in New Jersey, John Marino, a bowlegged ex-baseball catcher with a bad back, climbed off a bike and onto a choice piece of Garden State pavement. After riding across an entire country, and just 60 miles short of his destination--New York City Hall--he had discovered that his attempt to break the transcontinental record he had set the year before had failed. Demoralized, dehydrated, degraded and not at all happy, he found he couldn't pedal another foot.
SPORTS
September 27, 1986 | JEFF MEYERS
Why would anyone enter a bicycle race that takes him 542 miles across blazing desert, treacherous terrain and sub-freezing mountains? For Kirk Freeman of Newhall, there's only one reason: He hopes to finish fast enough to qualify for a race that will put 3,100 more miles on his tires and give him a lesson in American geography. Freeman is among 48 ultra-marathon cyclists in the John Marino Open, a nonstop race from Tucson to Flagstaff and back that starts today at 11 a.m.
NEWS
February 21, 1992 | Associated Press
The Democratic campaigns of Arkansas Gov. Bill Clinton and former Massachusetts Sen. Paul E. Tsongas each filed challenges Thursday designed to knock the other off New York's presidential primary ballot. State Democratic Chairman John Marino said, however, that he would do "whatever I legally can do" to see that both candidates are on the April 7 primary ballot.
NEWS
January 6, 1992 | Associated Press
Gov. Mario M. Cuomo should be on the state presidential primary ballot because it could give New York added clout when it comes to choosing a Democratic nominee this summer, the state party leader said Sunday. "The notion that this is some kind of draft Cuomo for President campaign is wrong," John Marino said about the effort to make Cuomo a favorite son candidate.
NEWS
January 7, 1992 | From Associated Press
Gov. Mario M. Cuomo slammed the door Monday on an effort to make him a favorite-son candidate in New York's April 7 Democratic presidential primary. Cuomo said in a statement that he did not want to be considered "because of the current intensity of the state's fiscal difficulties, and for the good of the party." Cuomo had announced on Dec. 20 that he would not run for President. But on Sunday, several New York Democratic county chairmen met to plan a Cuomo favorite-son candidacy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 1993 | MARY LOU PICKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An experimental therapy that increases the flow of oxygen to the lungs of critically ill newborns was used for the first time at UCI Medical Center this week to save the life of a Mission Viejo infant. Brennen J. Turbow Marino was the first infant in Southern California to undergo the new, non-invasive treatment that uses nitric oxide to dilate blood vessels in the lungs, and was back in the arms of his parents Friday, UCI doctors said.
NEWS
December 11, 1991 | ROBERT SHOGAN and JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
New Hampshire Democratic Party officials said Tuesday they have received phone calls from aides to Gov. Mario M. Cuomo saying he plans to announce his presidential candidacy as early as Monday if an accord is reached on the New York state budget deficit. The party officials also said one Cuomo aide asked for lists of forthcoming Democratic events in New Hampshire. A national party source said similar calls have been made to several other key primary states by Cuomo advisers.
NEWS
August 18, 1991 | CHRISTOPHER REYNOLDS
It crosses a continent, but the Race Across America operates with little exposure and even less money. Orange County contractor John Marino, founder and director of the 2,930-mile race, estimates the event's annual budget at about $60,000. While many riders spend more than $10,000 on equipment and other preparations, the 1991 winner's purse amounted to about $2,250 in cash, a $500 bicycle and an estimated $3,000 in goods and services coaxed from sponsors.
SPORTS
July 16, 1986
An unorthodox diet and sleep deprivation helped ultramarathon cyclist Pete Penseyres break the course record in the Race Across America. He pedaled into Atlantic City, N.J., Monday night--8 days 9 hours 47 minutes after leaving Huntington Beach on July 6. The Fallbrook resident's winning time for the 3,107-mile race was more than 16 hours better than the old course record of 9 days 2 hours 6 minutes set last year by Jonathon Boyer.
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