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John Matoian

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 1995 | DANIEL HOWARD CERONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Remember the formative years of the Fox network, when each new fall season brought such distinguished programs as "Babes," a 1991 sitcom about three obese sisters in a cramped apartment whose "self-esteem outweighs the problems they encounter"? And then there was 1992's "Woops!," featuring the six slap-happy survivors of a fateful trip, namely a planetary nuclear holocaust.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 1999 | BRIAN LOWRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For years, "The Larry Sanders Show" carried Home Box Office's banner as its flagship series, earning the pay channel critical plaudits and dozens of Emmy nominations. "We were pretty much all they had for a long time," said Brad Grey, one of the comedy's executive producers.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 1995 | Daniel Howard Cerone
Some of them you know. Some you don't. But the following artists, entertainers and executives have one thing in common: We're counting on each to mae a significant impact or difference in their respective fields this year. Sure, there will be thers who make a splash, but after we talked with dozens of people who work in entertainment and the arts, these were the names mentioned most often. You might say that Jim Carrey was a face to watch in '94, and you would be right.
BUSINESS
September 6, 1996 | BRIAN LOWRY and SALLIE HOFMEISTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
John A. Matoian, the president of Fox Entertainment Group, is expected to resign today, according to television sources, leaving the fourth-ranked network without a programming chief just as the new fall season opens. While Fox had a meteoric rise, it stalled last season after trying to broaden its viewership beyond a young audience. The network's executives, including Matoian, have been under increasing pressure from News Corp.
BUSINESS
September 6, 1996 | BRIAN LOWRY and SALLIE HOFMEISTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
John A. Matoian, the president of Fox Entertainment Group, is expected to resign today, according to television sources, leaving the fourth-ranked network without a programming chief just as the new fall season opens. While Fox had a meteoric rise, it stalled last season after trying to broaden its viewership beyond a young audience. The network's executives, including Matoian, have been under increasing pressure from News Corp.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 1999 | BRIAN LOWRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For years, "The Larry Sanders Show" carried Home Box Office's banner as its flagship series, earning the pay channel critical plaudits and dozens of Emmy nominations. "We were pretty much all they had for a long time," said Brad Grey, one of the comedy's executive producers.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 1994 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The new programming chief at Fox indicated Wednesday that he was not immediately planning a dramatic shift in direction for the network, but instead will try to bolster its existing prime-time schedule.
BUSINESS
February 10, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
30-Week TV Ratings Standard Abolished: The presidents of the four broadcast networks' entertainment divisions abolished the traditional 30-week TV season as a standard for the ratings winner. "Together, we are declaring an official end to the obsolete practice of declaring a prime-time winner after the conclusion of the traditional 30-week television season that runs from September to mid-April," they said.
BUSINESS
October 19, 1993
Ralph Simon has been named to the newly created position of executive vice president at Capitol Records. Simon will be the No. 2 man in the organization, overseeing all executive and operational functions. John Matoian, senior vice president of motion pictures for TV and miniseries at CBS, is reportedly in discussions with Fox to join the film studio in a newly created unit that would focus on producing family films.
BUSINESS
December 7, 1993
Jay Kriegel, a top aide and strategist to CBS Inc. Chairman Laurence A. Tisch, will leave the company early next year. Kriegel, as senior vice president, oversaw policy and regulatory issues at the network, was a major behind-the-scenes force and was chief architect of an unsuccessful campaign to get cable systems to pay for the right to carry CBS' broadcast signals.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 1995 | DANIEL HOWARD CERONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Remember the formative years of the Fox network, when each new fall season brought such distinguished programs as "Babes," a 1991 sitcom about three obese sisters in a cramped apartment whose "self-esteem outweighs the problems they encounter"? And then there was 1992's "Woops!," featuring the six slap-happy survivors of a fateful trip, namely a planetary nuclear holocaust.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 1995 | Daniel Howard Cerone
Some of them you know. Some you don't. But the following artists, entertainers and executives have one thing in common: We're counting on each to mae a significant impact or difference in their respective fields this year. Sure, there will be thers who make a splash, but after we talked with dozens of people who work in entertainment and the arts, these were the names mentioned most often. You might say that Jim Carrey was a face to watch in '94, and you would be right.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 1994 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The new programming chief at Fox indicated Wednesday that he was not immediately planning a dramatic shift in direction for the network, but instead will try to bolster its existing prime-time schedule.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 1994 | LEE MARGULIES, TIMES TELEVISION EDITOR
Only 10 days into the fall season, both Fox and NBC yanked shows out of the prime-time lineup to shore up obvious ratings weaknesses. Sent to the bench were NBC's "The Martin Short Show" and Fox's "Fortune Hunter" and "Wild Oats." NBC said Short's Tuesday night sitcom will definitely be given another shot in December, after the producers have had a chance to overhaul it--again. The show had been revamped after the pilot that was shot to sell the series.
BUSINESS
October 25, 1996 | SALLIE HOFMEISTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A month after resigning as president of Fox Entertainment Group, John Matoian has signed on as president of HBO Pictures and HBO NYC, the movie development arms of Time Warner's Home Box Office premium cable service. Matoian takes the position vacated by Robert Cooper, who became president of Sony's TriStar Pictures in July. "Movies is always where I felt most comfortable and where I've had the most success, and the best place to tell stories," Matoian said.
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