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John Maynard Keynes

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NEWS
May 7, 2013 | By Patt Morrison
There are Elvis impersonators and Mark Twain impersonators and Lincoln impersonators. Are there any John Maynard Keynes impersonators out there? Anybody? Keynes is the British economist whose advocacy of government's role in economic slumps has made him a hugely influential figure for decades, not to mention practically a household name, which for an economist is a very big deal. He's also been dead for nearly 70 years, which is why it was a bit of a one-sided discussion when Niall Ferguson, the Harvard historian who has no fondness for Keynes' policies, called out Keynes last week on more than his economics.
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OPINION
May 11, 2013
Re "Niall Ferguson's blooper," Opinion, May 7 Jonah Goldberg fails to address what is revealing about Niall Ferguson's ad hominem blooper on John Maynard Keynes' sexuality, for which the Harvard historian has given "an unqualified apology," according to the New York Times. The implication of Ferguson's remarks is that Keynes was in favor of big deficits and was not concerned about the long-term effects of his economic philosophy. That is far from the truth. Keynes considered economics to be a moral science.
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BOOKS
April 27, 1986 | Alexander Rosenberg, Rosenberg writes widely about philosophy and economics. and
John Maynard Keynes is the contemporary biographer's dream: the century's most influential economist; an engaging figure striding across a world stage, against a background of glamorous art, important ideas and powerful men; and a secret life suppressed in a famous work of hagiography that provides a ready target for debunking.
OPINION
May 7, 2013 | Jonah Goldberg
At an investment conference last week, Harvard historian Niall Ferguson created a huge mess for himself. He glibly speculated that maybe because economist John Maynard Keynes was a childless, "effete" homosexual, he embraced a doctrine that favored immediate economic gratification. Keynes' bon mot "in the long run, we are all dead" takes on new meaning when you realize he didn't have kids to worry about. FOR THE RECORD: Book title: The May 7 Jonah Goldberg column had a typo in the subtitle of William Greider's book “Secrets of the Temple.” It is “How the Federal Reserve Runs the Country,” not “County.” Following the usual script, but at a much faster clip, an uproar ensued on Twitter and in various blogs.
BOOKS
December 26, 1993 | Walter Russell Mead, Walter Russell Mead is the author of "Mortal Splendor: The American Empire in Transition" (Houghton Mifflin)
Students, people say, with good math skills who lack the personality to become CPAs go on to become economists. There is at least one glittering, glamorous exception to this dreary rule: John Maynard Keynes was one of the most interesting and attractive figures of the 20th Century. Robert Skidelsky is one of the most able biographers now writing in English. The combination makes Skidelsky's projected three-part biography a major event in the intellectual life of our time.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 2011 | By Alana Semuels, Los Angeles Times
Grand Pursuit The Story of Economic Genius Sylvia Nasar Simon & Schuster: 559 pp., $35 Today's economy may seem the bleakest in recent memory: plunging consumer confidence, slumping home prices, a stubbornly high unemployment rate. But as Sylvia Nasar reminds us in "Grand Pursuit: The Story of Economic Genius," in 1933 a full 25% of the nation was out of work, suicides were rising sharply, and stocks were trading at one-fifth of their 1929 prices. Then, as now, public leaders struggled with solving the spiraling economic crisis.
OPINION
January 15, 1989
What is all this noise I hear from the left wing concerning deficits? Why, all of a sudden, is it so terrible to be deficit spending when conservatives have been warning us of its perils since President Franklin D. Roosevelt and John Maynard Keynes took the reins of government in the 1930s? Don't you remember: "We're only borrowing from ourselves !" Who's kidding whom? It has been predicted for decades that at some point the debt would exponentially explode. So who's surprised?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 1991
Again, another hackneyed column by John Kenneth Galbraith in The Times ("The Price of Comfort," Opinion, Jan. 6) with the usual reverent references to John Maynard Keynes. The economic/political indictments of the Reagan-Bush administrations fail to note the liberal/Democrat-controlled Congress "spend-spend-spend" role in the dramatic "creditor-to-debtor" reversal of the U.S. world economic posture in just over 10 years. As the Paul M. Warburg Professor of Economics Emeritus at Harvard University, Galbraith and his professorial ilk taught the jocks who totally lacked business ethics and morality and who raped the S&Ls, perpetuated the philosophy of profit at any price and peddled junk bonds to the unsuspecting and devastated companies trying to protect themselves from mergers and acquisitions.
OPINION
May 11, 2013
Re "Niall Ferguson's blooper," Opinion, May 7 Jonah Goldberg fails to address what is revealing about Niall Ferguson's ad hominem blooper on John Maynard Keynes' sexuality, for which the Harvard historian has given "an unqualified apology," according to the New York Times. The implication of Ferguson's remarks is that Keynes was in favor of big deficits and was not concerned about the long-term effects of his economic philosophy. That is far from the truth. Keynes considered economics to be a moral science.
NATIONAL
May 4, 2013 | By Michael Mello
Well-known Harvard professor Niall Ferguson apologized Saturday for what he called “stupid and tactless remarks” suggesting sexual orientation influenced the polices of famed economist John Maynard Keynes. On Thursday, Ferguson suggested that the British economist lacked foresight about future generations because he was childless, and that he was childless because he was gay. Ferguson made the comments during a conference in Carlsbad, Calif., during a discussion on Keynes' famous line, “The long run is a misleading guide to current affairs.
NEWS
May 7, 2013 | By Patt Morrison
There are Elvis impersonators and Mark Twain impersonators and Lincoln impersonators. Are there any John Maynard Keynes impersonators out there? Anybody? Keynes is the British economist whose advocacy of government's role in economic slumps has made him a hugely influential figure for decades, not to mention practically a household name, which for an economist is a very big deal. He's also been dead for nearly 70 years, which is why it was a bit of a one-sided discussion when Niall Ferguson, the Harvard historian who has no fondness for Keynes' policies, called out Keynes last week on more than his economics.
NATIONAL
May 4, 2013 | By Michael Mello
Well-known Harvard professor Niall Ferguson apologized Saturday for what he called “stupid and tactless remarks” suggesting sexual orientation influenced the polices of famed economist John Maynard Keynes. On Thursday, Ferguson suggested that the British economist lacked foresight about future generations because he was childless, and that he was childless because he was gay. Ferguson made the comments during a conference in Carlsbad, Calif., during a discussion on Keynes' famous line, “The long run is a misleading guide to current affairs.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 2011 | By Alana Semuels, Los Angeles Times
Grand Pursuit The Story of Economic Genius Sylvia Nasar Simon & Schuster: 559 pp., $35 Today's economy may seem the bleakest in recent memory: plunging consumer confidence, slumping home prices, a stubbornly high unemployment rate. But as Sylvia Nasar reminds us in "Grand Pursuit: The Story of Economic Genius," in 1933 a full 25% of the nation was out of work, suicides were rising sharply, and stocks were trading at one-fifth of their 1929 prices. Then, as now, public leaders struggled with solving the spiraling economic crisis.
BUSINESS
November 23, 2009 | Michael Hiltzik
Great crises have a way of reminding us that acting as though we know perfectly well what the future holds almost always leads to disaster. That's especially true in economics, which tends to underscore the murkiness of the real world by dealing out surprises one after another -- booms, crashes, bubbles, you name it. It's fitting, therefore, that the recent economic meltdown has begun to restore that great apostle of uncertainty, John Maynard...
OPINION
November 26, 2006
Re "Theorist is dead, long live the theory," Opinion, Nov. 20 Niall Ferguson intimates that in the early 1980s, Milton Friedman was obscure at Oxford compared to John Kenneth Galbraith and John Maynard Keynes. My experience at Cambridge in 1975 was different: Keynes was filtered through textbooks, and you had to read my father on your own. After 1979, Friedman was omnipresent, his doctrines embraced by British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher and President Reagan, not to mention disseminated on TV. Now Ferguson argues that asset inflation resurrects an otherwise long-defunct Friedman doctrine.
BOOKS
March 17, 2002 | PETER G. GOSSELIN, Peter G. Gosselin is a national economics correspondent for The Times.
At first blush, John Maynard Keynes might seem an unusual choice as one of the last century's most influential people, and "Fighting for Britain, 1937-1946," the third thick volume by Robert Skidelsky of the British economist's life, might seem a tough sell, especially to an American audience. After all, Keynes was a terrible snob, particularly when it came to the United States ("I always regard a visit as in the nature of a serious illness").
OPINION
November 26, 2006
Re "Theorist is dead, long live the theory," Opinion, Nov. 20 Niall Ferguson intimates that in the early 1980s, Milton Friedman was obscure at Oxford compared to John Kenneth Galbraith and John Maynard Keynes. My experience at Cambridge in 1975 was different: Keynes was filtered through textbooks, and you had to read my father on your own. After 1979, Friedman was omnipresent, his doctrines embraced by British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher and President Reagan, not to mention disseminated on TV. Now Ferguson argues that asset inflation resurrects an otherwise long-defunct Friedman doctrine.
BOOKS
March 12, 2000
To the Editor: In his review of my book, "How To Overthrow the Government" (Book Review, Feb. 20), Joe Conason wondered what prompted the transformation in my political thinking. As anyone reading my column over the last five years knows, this certainly has been no overnight flip-flop. And for those few sturdy souls who've plowed through "The Other Revolution," the largely unread book on the crisis in political leadership I wrote in my mid-20s, it's clear that the seeds of "How to Overthrow the Government" were sown a long time ago. Having spent my college years at Cambridge, studying under John Maynard Keynes' disciples, I found myself inhaling a healthy skepticism of the power of the free market to bring about the good society.
BOOKS
December 26, 1993 | Walter Russell Mead, Walter Russell Mead is the author of "Mortal Splendor: The American Empire in Transition" (Houghton Mifflin)
Students, people say, with good math skills who lack the personality to become CPAs go on to become economists. There is at least one glittering, glamorous exception to this dreary rule: John Maynard Keynes was one of the most interesting and attractive figures of the 20th Century. Robert Skidelsky is one of the most able biographers now writing in English. The combination makes Skidelsky's projected three-part biography a major event in the intellectual life of our time.
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