Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJohn Mccracken
IN THE NEWS

John Mccracken

MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 1993 | WILLIAM WILSON, TIMES ART CRITIC
Times are still tough for most everybody. Artists are no exception. Like the rest of humanity, they scramble to cope. Some of the most successful art-makers in this town are quietly selling property, unloading cherished works from private collections or applying for teaching jobs. Others in better shape are declining to show new work for fear it won't sell in a lousy market and will be returned to the studio tainted by failure. It's understandable to retreat when the going gets rough.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 2011 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times
John McCracken, an artist whose fusion of painting with geometric sculpture in the mid-1960s came to embody an aesthetic distinctive to postwar Los Angeles, died Friday in New York. He was 76. McCracken had lived in Santa Fe, N.M., since 1994 and, according to a spokesman for his Manhattan gallery, had been in ill health. One among a group of artists whose work was variously described as representing the L.A. Cool School, thanks to its rejection of emotionally expressive gestures; Finish Fetish, in recognition of its pristine color and high-tech surfaces; and Minimalism, because of its reliance on simple geometric forms, McCracken in fact made singular painted sculptures that value a clarity of perception infused with spiritual connotations.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 1988 | WILLIAM WILSON
John McCracken has made shiny one-color cubes, slabs and plinths since the '60s. Exhibiting somewhat fitfully and inclined to wander off the mark, the artist has remained vaguely undefined despite museum exhibitions and a solid reputation among his peers. His latest batch of work feels like those ads that recommend beef when you want the real thing. McCracken has buckled down to visual matters that were in the air 25 years ago, matters that are still at the heart of the sculptural experience.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 1995 | DAVID PAGEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Bathed in natural light, John McCracken's beautifully installed exhibition at L.A. Louver Gallery's long, narrow, second-floor showroom (and adjoining open-air balcony) is a garden of unearthly delights. The pleasures it elicits have an otherworldly feel, though they're firmly rooted in the here and now. Five compact stainless-steel sculptures rest on ordinary pedestals and punctuate the gallery with flashes of silvery brilliance.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 1995 | DAVID PAGEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Bathed in natural light, John McCracken's beautifully installed exhibition at L.A. Louver Gallery's long, narrow, second-floor showroom (and adjoining open-air balcony) is a garden of unearthly delights. The pleasures it elicits have an otherworldly feel, though they're firmly rooted in the here and now. Five compact stainless-steel sculptures rest on ordinary pedestals and punctuate the gallery with flashes of silvery brilliance.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 2011 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times
John McCracken, an artist whose fusion of painting with geometric sculpture in the mid-1960s came to embody an aesthetic distinctive to postwar Los Angeles, died Friday in New York. He was 76. McCracken had lived in Santa Fe, N.M., since 1994 and, according to a spokesman for his Manhattan gallery, had been in ill health. One among a group of artists whose work was variously described as representing the L.A. Cool School, thanks to its rejection of emotionally expressive gestures; Finish Fetish, in recognition of its pristine color and high-tech surfaces; and Minimalism, because of its reliance on simple geometric forms, McCracken in fact made singular painted sculptures that value a clarity of perception infused with spiritual connotations.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 2007 | Suzanne Muchnic
Works by Los Angeles-based artists will loom large and audacious in an auction of contemporary art from the collection of Swiss dealer Pierre Huber on Monday night at Christie's New York. Paul McCarthy's "Bear and Rabbit on a Rock," a 9-foot-tall sculpture of joyfully copulating stuffed animals, is expected to fetch between $1 million and $1.5 million. Mike Kelley's "Test Room," an installation inspired by a psychologist's laboratory, is valued at $800,000 to $1.2 million.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 1986 | KRISTINE McKENNA
While moonlighting from his career as one of Hollywood's best-known character actors, Sterling Holloway amassed a noteworthy collection of contemporary art. Failing health now forces Holloway to sell his collection and it is being parceled out piecemeal. (The collection is at the Asher/Faure Gallery, 612 N. Almont Drive, to Sept. 13). A number of these works are of museum quality and it's unfortunate that they're soon to disappear yet again into private collections.
NEWS
August 16, 2007
The California myth, from its iconography of Boosterism on citrus crate-labels to the alternating utopian and dystopian themes of a paradise landscape brazenly courting the Apocalypse, is mapped all over the artistic output of the region's artists.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 1987 | COLIN GARDNER
Unlike most artists who appropriate images and objects, Annette Lemieux is largely concerned with their role as memorabilia, as icons of lost eras and irreplaceable moments. However, far from representing a simple exercise in nostalgia, the work is also about the way meaning inevitably remakes itself in accordance with changing history.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 1993 | WILLIAM WILSON, TIMES ART CRITIC
Times are still tough for most everybody. Artists are no exception. Like the rest of humanity, they scramble to cope. Some of the most successful art-makers in this town are quietly selling property, unloading cherished works from private collections or applying for teaching jobs. Others in better shape are declining to show new work for fear it won't sell in a lousy market and will be returned to the studio tainted by failure. It's understandable to retreat when the going gets rough.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 1988 | WILLIAM WILSON
John McCracken has made shiny one-color cubes, slabs and plinths since the '60s. Exhibiting somewhat fitfully and inclined to wander off the mark, the artist has remained vaguely undefined despite museum exhibitions and a solid reputation among his peers. His latest batch of work feels like those ads that recommend beef when you want the real thing. McCracken has buckled down to visual matters that were in the air 25 years ago, matters that are still at the heart of the sculptural experience.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|