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John Mcdonnell

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 2003 | Elaine Woo, Times Staff Writer
John Brian McDonnell was what one friend called a "spiritual busybody": someone who could not help but intervene in a world that saddened him with its injustices. A former Jesuit seminarian, he entered history as the young pacifist who fasted for 37 days across the street from the White House to protest the U.S. incursion into Cambodia during the Vietnam War.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 2003 | Elaine Woo, Times Staff Writer
John Brian McDonnell was what one friend called a "spiritual busybody": someone who could not help but intervene in a world that saddened him with its injustices. A former Jesuit seminarian, he entered history as the young pacifist who fasted for 37 days across the street from the White House to protest the U.S. incursion into Cambodia during the Vietnam War.
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BUSINESS
May 14, 1992 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Air Force officials may have violated federal law in their secret efforts to help financially ailing McDonnell Douglas in late 1990, a time when the aerospace firm was seeking hundreds of millions of dollars in unusual payments, the Pentagon's top investigator disclosed Wednesday in Congress. In addition, defense officials revealed that John McDonnell, chairman of the St. Louis aerospace firm, told senior Pentagon leaders in a secret Oct.
SPORTS
June 2, 1998 | EARL GUSTKEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Who's the most successful coach in NCAA history? John Wooden and his 10 NCAA basketball championships at UCLA? Not even close. Rod Dedeaux and his 11 College World Series baseball titles for USC? Forget it. Dean Cromwell and his 12 track championships in the 1930s and '40s at USC? Nope. The NCAA track and field championships begin Wednesday at Buffalo, N.Y.
MAGAZINE
December 1, 1991 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, Ralph Vartabedian covers the aerospace industry for The Times
"HELLO AGAIN," SAYS THE WIRY MAN with a closely trimmed beard. He's wearing metal-rim glasses and holding a book as if ready to begin a college lecture. "I am John McDonnell and thank you for letting me into your home." It is the stock opening scene of McDonnell's personal video show, repeated four times a year and mailed on videocassettes to the 113,000 McDonnell Douglas "teammates" under his command.
BUSINESS
February 2, 1988
Sanford N. McDonnell will retire as chairman and chief executive of McDonnell Douglas Corp., St. Louis, on March 2 and will be succeeded at the aerospace giant by John McDonnell, his cousin and the company's president and chief operating officer. Sanford McDonnell, 65, is a nephew of McDonnell Douglas founder James S. McDonnell and became chairman in 1980 upon the death of his uncle. John McDonnell, 49, is a son of James S. McDonnell and has been president of the company since 1980.
BUSINESS
October 14, 1993 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Acknowledging that "errors appear to have occurred," McDonnell Douglas Chairman John McDonnell said Wednesday that the company would investigate whether the firm had billed the Pentagon for millions of dollars in advertising and entertainment charges, as alleged in a government audit. In a statement, McDonnell said he was "concerned about these reports and committed to resolving this issue promptly."
SPORTS
June 2, 1998 | EARL GUSTKEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Who's the most successful coach in NCAA history? John Wooden and his 10 NCAA basketball championships at UCLA? Not even close. Rod Dedeaux and his 11 College World Series baseball titles for USC? Forget it. Dean Cromwell and his 12 track championships in the 1930s and '40s at USC? Nope. The NCAA track and field championships begin Wednesday at Buffalo, N.Y.
BUSINESS
October 27, 1992 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
McDonnell Douglas, weakened by internal problems and tough competition, will probably quit the commercial aircraft business in the 1990s, a Georgetown University study has concluded. The report by the National Security Studies Program at Georgetown cites as major shortcomings the long erosion in McDonnell's position in the world jetliner market and its financial inability to develop new products.
BUSINESS
October 14, 1993 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Acknowledging that "errors appear to have occurred," McDonnell Douglas Chairman John McDonnell said Wednesday that the company would investigate whether the firm had billed the Pentagon for millions of dollars in advertising and entertainment charges, as alleged in a government audit. In a statement, McDonnell said he was "concerned about these reports and committed to resolving this issue promptly."
BUSINESS
October 27, 1992 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
McDonnell Douglas, weakened by internal problems and tough competition, will probably quit the commercial aircraft business in the 1990s, a Georgetown University study has concluded. The report by the National Security Studies Program at Georgetown cites as major shortcomings the long erosion in McDonnell's position in the world jetliner market and its financial inability to develop new products.
BUSINESS
June 17, 1992 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For McDonnell Douglas, the clock is ticking. When company executives unveiled the new MD-12 jetliner about six weeks ago, it was hailed as a revolutionary aircraft that would enable the firm to leapfrog Boeing and Airbus Industrie. But McDonnell leaped nowhere when customers quickly rejected the design. The company was forced to put the project on ice. The episode is another in a series of missteps that have eroded confidence in the St.
BUSINESS
May 14, 1992 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Air Force officials may have violated federal law in their secret efforts to help financially ailing McDonnell Douglas in late 1990, a time when the aerospace firm was seeking hundreds of millions of dollars in unusual payments, the Pentagon's top investigator disclosed Wednesday in Congress. In addition, defense officials revealed that John McDonnell, chairman of the St. Louis aerospace firm, told senior Pentagon leaders in a secret Oct.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 1992
I am 9 years old and attend fourth grade at Fern Avenue School in Torrance. My dad handed me your Dec. 1 issue and asked what I thought about a photograph that states, "workers at Douglas Aircraft's Long Beach plant assemble C-17 cargo jet." In fact, the aircraft is a DC-10. I have flown on them to see my grandparents in Maryland several times. AARON STINDE Torrance Editor's note: The aircraft in the photo, incorrectly identified as a C-17, is an MD-11 passenger plane.
MAGAZINE
December 1, 1991 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, Ralph Vartabedian covers the aerospace industry for The Times
"HELLO AGAIN," SAYS THE WIRY MAN with a closely trimmed beard. He's wearing metal-rim glasses and holding a book as if ready to begin a college lecture. "I am John McDonnell and thank you for letting me into your home." It is the stock opening scene of McDonnell's personal video show, repeated four times a year and mailed on videocassettes to the 113,000 McDonnell Douglas "teammates" under his command.
BUSINESS
November 10, 1989 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
McDonnell Douglas is apparently concerned that Northrop's corporate image problems could undermine the two firms' chances of winning a competition to jointly build the Advanced Tactical Fighter, according to securities analysts and industry sources. A McDonnell session with analysts earlier this week left many of them convinced that the firm has entered discussions to significantly modify its agreement with Northrop, including the possibility of taking over Northrop's leadership position.
BUSINESS
June 17, 1992 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For McDonnell Douglas, the clock is ticking. When company executives unveiled the new MD-12 jetliner about six weeks ago, it was hailed as a revolutionary aircraft that would enable the firm to leapfrog Boeing and Airbus Industrie. But McDonnell leaped nowhere when customers quickly rejected the design. The company was forced to put the project on ice. The episode is another in a series of missteps that have eroded confidence in the St.
NEWS
November 20, 1991 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
McDonnell Douglas announced late Tuesday that it signed a preliminary agreement to sell 40% of its Long Beach-based commercial aircraft business to investors in Taiwan and create a new international aerospace company that would be jointly owned with the Taiwanese. The historic deal, if approved by the U.S. and Taiwan governments, would be the first time that a foreign nation has taken a substantial ownership position in a major U.S. aircraft company.
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