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April 13, 1989 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Jerome Kern's 1924 Broadway musical "Sitting Pretty," which has not been seen since its opening run 65 years ago, will return to New York in concert version for five performances at Carnegie Recital Hall beginning tonight. When Kern, who later wrote "Show Boat," composed the music for "Sitting Pretty," he issued an edict banning the songs from being recorded or played on the radio or performed in nightclubs and cabarets to discourage his work from being distorted by popular renditions.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 1989 | William Ratliff
These are world premiere recordings of the original versions of eight overtures (composed between 1914 and 1939) and selections from the film score for "Swing Time" (1936). Though well played, the music is mostly second rate and seriously dated and will interest mainly the nostalgic and the musicologists.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 1988 | DON HECKMAN
Niggers all work on de Mississippi, niggers all work while de white folks play . . . . Wait a minute. Can that be right? Don't the opening lines of "Show Boat" read "Here we all work . . . etc.?" Well, yes and no. The fact is that the opening lines above are the original lyric, but in the six decades since the musical play by composer Jerome Kern and lyricist/librettist Oscar Hammerstein II opened on Dec.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 1989 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Jerome Kern's 1924 Broadway musical "Sitting Pretty," which has not been seen since its opening run 65 years ago, will return to New York in concert version for five performances at Carnegie Recital Hall beginning tonight. When Kern, who later wrote "Show Boat," composed the music for "Sitting Pretty," he issued an edict banning the songs from being recorded or played on the radio or performed in nightclubs and cabarets to discourage his work from being distorted by popular renditions.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 1989 | William Ratliff
These are world premiere recordings of the original versions of eight overtures (composed between 1914 and 1939) and selections from the film score for "Swing Time" (1936). Though well played, the music is mostly second rate and seriously dated and will interest mainly the nostalgic and the musicologists.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 1989 | DANIEL CARIAGA
Fifty-nine performances, including 40 by the Los Angeles Philharmonic, five by the Montreal Symphony, one by the visiting Boston Pops Orchestra, five jazz concerts and five Virtuoso events, make up the 1989 summer season at Hollywood Bowl, July 3-Sept. 16. In addition, it was announced Thursday, the schedule will include 40 classical and pops soloists, two July Fourth concerts, three Philharmonic Institute Orchestra concerts and two preseason Mozart concerts. During the season L.A.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 1989 | JOHN HENKEN
One of the burgeoning crowd of crossover divas, American mezzo Frederica von Stade made her Hollywood Bowl debut in weekend concerts devoted to the music of Richard Rodgers. Bound by the scores and the microphone, she made no show-bizzy efforts to sell a dozen songs with lyrics by Lorenz Hart. Instead, Stade offered sincere sentiment, a glimmer of wit, and sensitive, rich and generous singing--too generous in vibrato.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 1987 | HERBERT GLASS
In 1922, fresh from a lengthy American tour, the French composer Darius Milhaud began work on the score for a ballet treating the creation of the world as depicted in African folklore. Milhaud's musical Africa turned out to be represented by the music he heard in Harlem jazz clubs. The resultant composition, "La Creation du monde," if not the first jazz-inspired "classical" piece, was surely the most extensive and least sanitized to that time.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 1995 | Laurie Winer, Laurie Winer is The Times' theater critic. and
The death of the musical is a sore point for any serious lover of the form. It's a perennial topic, made relevant recent ly by the Broadway premiere of the great-looking "Sunset Boulevard"--a show that offers visual grandeur but very little in the way of heart or even joy, traditionally the musical's stock in trade. Norma Desmond is not the first deranged protagonist in a musical, but she lacks the big emotion, unless you count fear and insecurity.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 1988 | DON HECKMAN
Niggers all work on de Mississippi, niggers all work while de white folks play . . . . Wait a minute. Can that be right? Don't the opening lines of "Show Boat" read "Here we all work . . . etc.?" Well, yes and no. The fact is that the opening lines above are the original lyric, but in the six decades since the musical play by composer Jerome Kern and lyricist/librettist Oscar Hammerstein II opened on Dec.
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