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John Mcintire

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February 1, 1991 | BURT A. FOLKART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John McIntire, the commanding character actor whose career extended from radio's legendary "March of Time" to television's popular "Wagon Train," with stops in between for stage and film work, died Wednesday. Family members in Kalispell, Mont., where McIntire regularly took refuge from acting to stay at his ranch near the Canadian border, said he was 83. He died in a Pasadena hospital where he was taken over the weekend from a second home in Laguna Beach.
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NEWS
February 1, 1991 | BURT A. FOLKART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John McIntire, the commanding character actor whose career extended from radio's legendary "March of Time" to television's popular "Wagon Train," with stops in between for stage and film work, died Wednesday. Family members in Kalispell, Mont., where McIntire regularly took refuge from acting to stay at his ranch near the Canadian border, said he was 83. He died in a Pasadena hospital where he was taken over the weekend from a second home in Laguna Beach.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 2009 | Times Staff And Wire Reports
Richard Lewis, 89, a TV producer who brought to the small screen such 1950s series as "Wagon Train" and "M Squad," died Monday of complications from melanoma at his home in Somers, N.Y., according to his son Jeffrey. As a producer and executive producer for Revue Productions and then Universal Television, Lewis worked on "M Squad," a police drama starring Lee Marvin that ran from 1957 to 1960, and "Wagon Train," a western anthology featuring Ward Bond and John McIntire that aired from 1957 to 1965.
NEWS
May 30, 1993 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
NBC took a gamble when the network introduced its new Western, "The Virginian," on Sept. 19, 1962. Westerns were still a popular TV series genre, but most sagebrush sagas were either 30 minutes or an hour in length. "The Virginian" was different--it was the first 90-minute Western. The peacock network's gamble paid off. "The Virginian," which was set in 1880s Wyoming Territory, endured for nine seasons on NBC and currently is seen in repeats Saturdays on the Family Channel.
NEWS
June 9, 1998 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jeanette Nolan, a character actress whose career spanned 70 years and included the current motion picture "The Horse Whisperer," has died. She was 86. Nolan, who portrayed Robert Redford's mother in the contemporary western film, died Friday in Cedars-Sinai Medical Center after a stroke. A native of Los Angeles, Nolan began acting with the Pasadena Community Playhouse in her teens and moved into radio while a student at Los Angeles City College.
NEWS
January 30, 1994 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Back in 1950, John Ford directed the Western drama "Wagon Master" about two young cowhands (Ben Johnson and Harry Carey Jr.) who join a Mormon wagon train traveling to Utah. That classic, which was filmed in Monument Valley, became the basis of the long-running TV Western "Wagon Train." Repeats of the series currently air Saturdays on the Family Channel. "Wagon Train" premiered Sept. 18, 1957, on NBC.
NEWS
March 7, 1993 | CHRISTINA V. GODBEY
Claire Dunkel may be 76, but she has no intention of giving up the stage anytime soon. She is a member of the Nine O'Clock Players, an auxiliary of the Assistance League of Southern California, a volunteer theater troupe that performs for mentally and physically challenged children and inner-city youth. "It's a lot more fun than sitting around playing bridge because you are contributing to the community," the longtime Hollywood Hills resident said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 2006 | Dennis McLellan, Times Staff Writer
Herbert B. Leonard, a film and television producer who brought "The Adventures of Rin Tin Tin" and the classic TV dramatic series "Naked City" and "Route 66" to television in the 1950s and '60s, has died. He was 84. Leonard died of cancer Saturday at his home in the Hollywood Hills, said his daughter Gina Leonard.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 1989 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON
When Tom Hanks stares testily or fondly at his co-star in "Turner and Hooch" (citywide), a Dogue de Bordeaux named Beasley, you can sense a real connection. And when Beasley stares back--wattles matted with froth, huge red eyes in a Winston Churchill-ish glower--these two actors seem to have genuine respect for each other's abilities. Hanks shrieks; Beasley cocks his head. Hanks pants; Beasley barks. Hanks kvetches; Beasley sniffs.
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