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John Mckinney

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TRAVEL
February 14, 1993
Thanks very much for the continued use of John McKinney's "hikes columns." Most appreciated! LINDA J. HOYER Whittier
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TRAVEL
December 1, 2002
John McKinney urged visitors to imagine the future of the Kenneth Hahn State Recreation Area extension in "Bring Your Imagination to See the Future of Baldwin Hills" (Hiking, Nov. 24). But readers would get an immediate thrill by visiting the area as soon as possible. The northerly view from the Baldwin Hills is incomparable in scope and drama as it includes towns, contours and high-rise clusters from west to east. It's a world-class spectacle on a sunny day after a storm has washed down the whole city and the stark downtown skyscrapers have the snow-covered Sierra for a backdrop, Mt. Wilson, Baldy and all. Jaime G. Monroy Long Beach
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NEWS
September 21, 1986
Re the "fictional Greek island called Paxos": True, Cleopatra and almost every other traveler in the last 2,000 years has hurried past it in order to visit nearby Corfu, but the island is a charming place that produces some of the finest olive oil in Greece. You can find Paxos on the map just below Corfu in the Ionian Sea. JOHN McKINNEY Santa Barbara
TRAVEL
April 8, 2001
I'm glad John McKinney recommended hiking to Death Valley's Zabriskie Point early or late in the day ('A Golden Point of View at Zabriskie," Hiking, March 18). Several years ago I joined a group from a community college for a field trip to Death Valley in mid-March that included the nature hike McKinney described. It was late morning when the leaders dropped us off with instructions to hike to Zabriskie Point, where they would be waiting. They gave us the impression that this would be a relatively short distance, not the 900-foot elevation gain over the three-mile length that it is. Off we went, some of us without water or proper headgear.
TRAVEL
September 19, 1993
I read John McKinney's article about the Mt. Whitney trail (Aug. 29) with much interest, since I have climbed Whitney dozens of times. Some factual errors: The trail was moved in 1977, making it 11 miles from the trail head to the top, as indicated on the sign at the bottom of the trail, as well as numerous recent guidebooks. Trail Crest is at an elevation of 13,777 feet, not 13,714. The actual trail head is at 8,360 feet, some 500 feet higher than Whitney Portal Camp. These errors may seem a bit picayune, but the extra 1/3 mile and few hundred feet of elevation make a big difference to a tired hiker, particularly at 14,000 feet.
TRAVEL
December 16, 1990
My wife and I embarked happily on the Horn Canyon Trail in Ojai as described by John McKinney ("Bound for the Pines in the Mountains of Ojai," Nov. 11). He got a little confused at the start when he wrote that the ranger station is on the right as you drive east of town. It is on the left. Then he directs you to turn onto Grand and drive half a mile to McAndrew Road. It turns out that it is 2 1/2 miles. I am happy to report that the rest of his descriptions were all right. BRUCE L. BENNETT San Luis Obispo
NEWS
November 1, 1986
John McKinney's story of Cuyamaca Rancho Park and the hike up Stonewall Peak (Day Hike, Oct. 4) really made our three-day jaunt to San Diego. Having concluded my business at UCSD, we decided to take three days back to L.A. just for the heck of it. We stopped all one day at Cuyamaca Park, and thanks to McKinney's story, repeated his trip up and back the same way. The weather was showery, so we had the added attraction of lightning and thunder....
TRAVEL
December 1, 2002
John McKinney urged visitors to imagine the future of the Kenneth Hahn State Recreation Area extension in "Bring Your Imagination to See the Future of Baldwin Hills" (Hiking, Nov. 24). But readers would get an immediate thrill by visiting the area as soon as possible. The northerly view from the Baldwin Hills is incomparable in scope and drama as it includes towns, contours and high-rise clusters from west to east. It's a world-class spectacle on a sunny day after a storm has washed down the whole city and the stark downtown skyscrapers have the snow-covered Sierra for a backdrop, Mt. Wilson, Baldy and all. Jaime G. Monroy Long Beach
TRAVEL
May 28, 1995
Our entire family enjoyed John McKinney's informative article ("New Life for the Lonesome Desert," March 26). We were so impressed that we went to the East Mojave to try to capture some of the love McKinney found there. Thank you so very much for such delightful reading. THE JAMES GONOS FAMILY Downey Your article reminded me of a trip I took in 1993. I was a passenger on an Amtrak train that made an unscheduled stop in Nipton to drop off a sick passenger. The train usually races through town, so that unscheduled stop made history.
TRAVEL
June 24, 1990
My wife and I enjoyed your June 10 front-page article, "Hike the World, Stay at Home," by John McKinney. McKinney's descriptions of the varied Southland terrain that's similar to places worldwide was outstanding and thought-provoking. It's refreshing to read a paean about our area after all the out-of-town media bashing--our smog, crime, overbuilding, traffic congestion, homeless, etc. Admittedly, these are dire problems with no easy solutions. But this area still ranks as the place more people from all over the world would like to live (which, I guess, is part of the problem)
TRAVEL
May 28, 1995
Our entire family enjoyed John McKinney's informative article ("New Life for the Lonesome Desert," March 26). We were so impressed that we went to the East Mojave to try to capture some of the love McKinney found there. Thank you so very much for such delightful reading. THE JAMES GONOS FAMILY Downey Your article reminded me of a trip I took in 1993. I was a passenger on an Amtrak train that made an unscheduled stop in Nipton to drop off a sick passenger. The train usually races through town, so that unscheduled stop made history.
TRAVEL
September 19, 1993
I read John McKinney's article about the Mt. Whitney trail (Aug. 29) with much interest, since I have climbed Whitney dozens of times. Some factual errors: The trail was moved in 1977, making it 11 miles from the trail head to the top, as indicated on the sign at the bottom of the trail, as well as numerous recent guidebooks. Trail Crest is at an elevation of 13,777 feet, not 13,714. The actual trail head is at 8,360 feet, some 500 feet higher than Whitney Portal Camp. These errors may seem a bit picayune, but the extra 1/3 mile and few hundred feet of elevation make a big difference to a tired hiker, particularly at 14,000 feet.
TRAVEL
February 14, 1993
Thanks very much for the continued use of John McKinney's "hikes columns." Most appreciated! LINDA J. HOYER Whittier
TRAVEL
January 5, 1992
I am an avid fan of John McKinney's regular articles on hiking trails. The Nov. 24 story, "Roads Less Traveled Off Mulholland," resulted in my getting hopelessly lost. Through no fault of McKinney's, the problem was caused by a misleading sign on the Garapito Trail. Readers should be aware that after they enter the signed Garapito Trail from the Temescal Fire Road they will come to another sign (about one mile from the trail head) pointing the wrong way. At this sign, hikers should take a sharp left turn up the trail rather than proceeding straight ahead as the sign indicates.
TRAVEL
December 16, 1990
My wife and I embarked happily on the Horn Canyon Trail in Ojai as described by John McKinney ("Bound for the Pines in the Mountains of Ojai," Nov. 11). He got a little confused at the start when he wrote that the ranger station is on the right as you drive east of town. It is on the left. Then he directs you to turn onto Grand and drive half a mile to McAndrew Road. It turns out that it is 2 1/2 miles. I am happy to report that the rest of his descriptions were all right. BRUCE L. BENNETT San Luis Obispo
TRAVEL
June 24, 1990
My wife and I enjoyed your June 10 front-page article, "Hike the World, Stay at Home," by John McKinney. McKinney's descriptions of the varied Southland terrain that's similar to places worldwide was outstanding and thought-provoking. It's refreshing to read a paean about our area after all the out-of-town media bashing--our smog, crime, overbuilding, traffic congestion, homeless, etc. Admittedly, these are dire problems with no easy solutions. But this area still ranks as the place more people from all over the world would like to live (which, I guess, is part of the problem)
TRAVEL
January 5, 1992
I am an avid fan of John McKinney's regular articles on hiking trails. The Nov. 24 story, "Roads Less Traveled Off Mulholland," resulted in my getting hopelessly lost. Through no fault of McKinney's, the problem was caused by a misleading sign on the Garapito Trail. Readers should be aware that after they enter the signed Garapito Trail from the Temescal Fire Road they will come to another sign (about one mile from the trail head) pointing the wrong way. At this sign, hikers should take a sharp left turn up the trail rather than proceeding straight ahead as the sign indicates.
TRAVEL
April 8, 2001
I'm glad John McKinney recommended hiking to Death Valley's Zabriskie Point early or late in the day ('A Golden Point of View at Zabriskie," Hiking, March 18). Several years ago I joined a group from a community college for a field trip to Death Valley in mid-March that included the nature hike McKinney described. It was late morning when the leaders dropped us off with instructions to hike to Zabriskie Point, where they would be waiting. They gave us the impression that this would be a relatively short distance, not the 900-foot elevation gain over the three-mile length that it is. Off we went, some of us without water or proper headgear.
NEWS
November 1, 1986
John McKinney's story of Cuyamaca Rancho Park and the hike up Stonewall Peak (Day Hike, Oct. 4) really made our three-day jaunt to San Diego. Having concluded my business at UCSD, we decided to take three days back to L.A. just for the heck of it. We stopped all one day at Cuyamaca Park, and thanks to McKinney's story, repeated his trip up and back the same way. The weather was showery, so we had the added attraction of lightning and thunder....
NEWS
September 21, 1986
Re the "fictional Greek island called Paxos": True, Cleopatra and almost every other traveler in the last 2,000 years has hurried past it in order to visit nearby Corfu, but the island is a charming place that produces some of the finest olive oil in Greece. You can find Paxos on the map just below Corfu in the Ionian Sea. JOHN McKINNEY Santa Barbara
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