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John Mcnamara

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October 6, 1986 | ROSS NEWHAN, Times Staff Writer
It is 5 a.m. on the morning after the Boston Red Sox have clinched the American League East championship. John McNamara, the manager, is alone in his suburban Natick house. He had driven his son, Mike, to the airport after the clubhouse celebration of the day before. A Marine Corps lieutenant, Mike McNamara was returning to Camp Lejeune in North Carolina. They embraced, father and son, tears in their eyes, proud of each other. McNamara's wife, Ellen, an airline hostess, is out of town, working.
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January 18, 2001 | MIKE DiGIOVANNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John McNamara and Bob Clear, career baseball men who were institutions at the Angels' spring training facility in Tempe, Ariz., will be absent when the team opens camp in February after they were essentially forced to resign. McNamara, who spent 19 years as a big league manager and served nine years as the Angels' minor league catching coach, was offered a job as an assistant to player development director Darrell Miller but declined because the Angels wanted to cut his salary by about 75%.
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SPORTS
November 18, 1989
Cleveland's hiring of John McNamara as manager--now that's a marriage made in heaven! CHUCK HILL, Van Nuys
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September 13, 1996 | MIKE DiGIOVANNA
The Angels are no longer an All-Maddon team. John McNamara, recovering from a blood clot in his right calf, received medical clearance to resume managing and will join the Angels in Kansas City today. Joe Maddon, who ran the team in McNamara's absence, will return to his role as bench coach. "I'm getting fired," Maddon said. "We're back to just one interim manager. No more interim squared."
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November 1, 1986
Is it true that the Mets voted a full winner's share and World Series ring to John McNamara? NICHOLAS J. SLAYMAN Pasadena
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July 7, 1991 | From Associated Press
The Cleveland Indians, winners of only five games since June 3 and whose 26-52 record is the worst in the major leagues, fired Manager John McNamara and replaced him with first base coach Mike Hargrove on Saturday. McNamara, 59, was in the second year of a two-year contract with the Indians, the sixth major league team he has managed. Jimmy Dykes and Dick Williams are the only others to manage that many major league teams since 1900.
BUSINESS
April 16, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Auto Dealer's Bail Set at $300 Million: Bail was set at $300 million for a wealthy auto dealer charged with bilking General Motors Corp. out of hundreds of millions of dollars in a scheme to sell nonexistent cars to foreign customers. John McNamara, 52, of East Setauket, N.Y., faces federal charges of mail fraud, wire fraud and money laundering. McNamara allegedly obtained more than $400 million in loans starting in 1980 from GM's financing subsidiary, General Motors Acceptance Corp.
BUSINESS
September 10, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Car Dealer Admits Stealing From GM: Long Island car dealer and real estate developer John McNamara admitted to stealing millions of dollars from General Motors and said he used some of the money to bribe local and state officials. McNamara, who pleaded guilty to one count of federal racketeering, faces up to 20 years in prison and $800 million in fines. He admitted that he received more than $6.25 billion in loans from General Motors Acceptance Corp.
BUSINESS
June 12, 1992 | DONALD WOUTAT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Citing mismanagement and poor judgment, General Motors Corp. ordered a major housecleaning at its giant finance subsidiary Thursday in the wake of embarrassing charges of a $422-million fraud at one of its car dealers. GM replaced the president, the chief financial officer and the operations boss of General Motors Acceptance Corp. It also reassigned several other officials and said it is taking disciplinary action against "numerous" employees at GMAC's Smithtown, N.Y., office.
SPORTS
July 30, 1996
In the 20 seasons that Tom Lasorda led the Dodgers, 185 managers came and went around the major leagues.
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August 27, 1996 | JOHN WEYLER
John McNamara, hospitalized last Wednesday because of a blood clot in his right calf, said he felt fine and was ready to leave Columbia Presbyterian Hospital in New York. But doctors were still working Monday to balance his blood-thinning medication. "They're still not sure how [the blood clot] got there, but as soon as they get [the medication] where they want it, I'm going home," McNamara said.
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August 25, 1996 | MIKE DiGIOVANNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The vascular surgeon treating John McNamara said Saturday the threat to the Angel manager's life "has diminished dramatically," but there was significant cause for concern Wednesday, when a blood clot was found in McNamara's right calf. Dr. Alvin Benvenisty of New York's Columbia Presbyterian Hospital said several other clots were discovered--one between McNamara's knee and thigh--and were moving toward his lungs, where they could have caused considerable damage.
SPORTS
August 13, 1996 | MIKE DiGIOVANNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John McNamara has felt a bit claustrophobic during the past two games, but he says managing via walkie-talkie from his Angel clubhouse office does have its advantages. "The thing about watching the game on television, especially with this club," he said, "is you can get up and go to another room."
SPORTS
August 7, 1996 | ROSS NEWHAN
A heart attack influenced Tom Lasorda to resign as manager of the Dodgers last week. At the least, sources have said, it influenced the club owner, Peter O'Malley, to suggest to Lasorda that this was the appropriate time to resign. Did a lack of heart among his players influence Marcel Lachemann to resign as manager of the Angels? Tony Tavares, president of Disney Sports Enterprises, implied it on a day when Lachemann wouldn't. "This is a team that hasn't focused on being a team," Tavares said.
SPORTS
August 7, 1996
Managing the Angels has never been a job with lots of security. A look at the 18 men who have run the team since its inception in 1961.
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August 7, 1996 | JOHN WEYLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John McNamara could dig his fingernail into the paint on the white cinder-block walls and scratch down about 30 years to the layer that greeted him on his first afternoon as a major league manager. On Sept. 16, 1969, Oakland A's owner Charlie Finley fired Hank Bauer during a trip to Anaheim and gave the 37-year-old McNamara his first job managing in the big leagues. Told to lay low until the afternoon announcement, McNamara spent the morning with Joe DiMaggio. Where had he gone?
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