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John Mcsherry

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SPORTS
October 2, 1990
Rich Garcia, Terry Cooney, John Hirschbeck, Larry McCoy, Vic Voltaggio and Jim Evans will umpire the American League playoffs, and Harry Wendelstedt, John McSherry, Dutch Rennert, Jerry Crawford, Gerry Davis and Paul Runge will work the National League playoffs.
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SPORTS
April 13, 1996
Those two clods who commented on the death of umpire John McSherry in last week's Viewpoint must not have experienced any tragedy in their lives. I guess in their cretinous minds, any time an overweight person dies, it means they deserved it. Never mind the feelings of loved ones. I guess all of us with imperfections or differences are deemed expendable. That "logic" sounds familiar. Wasn't it espoused in "Mein Kampf"? RODNEY K. BOSWELL Los Angeles
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SPORTS
April 6, 1996
I'm perplexed by the news media's invariable description of umpire John McSherry's sudden death as "tragic." The man was over 50, dangerously overweight and had concomitant health problems. He also died doing what he loved to do for decades. I don't understand the "tragedy" here. Are the rest of us not going to die, or suffer apparently so little in the process? BOB GORE Santa Monica I find it difficult to conjure up sympathy for John McSherry, who weighed 328 pounds (probably more)
SPORTS
April 7, 1996 | BILL PLASCHKE
At least he died an umpire's death. So said baseball's misty-eyed sages last week, and they were right. But not because John McSherry was wrapped in blue, or lying behind home plate, or working in the only city that still has an opening day parade. He died an umpire's death because he died alone. Every day of every summer, one of them dies alone. Maybe it's behind second base, a stumpy old manager spraying him with lunch, the crowd roaring for more.
SPORTS
April 13, 1996
Those two clods who commented on the death of umpire John McSherry in last week's Viewpoint must not have experienced any tragedy in their lives. I guess in their cretinous minds, any time an overweight person dies, it means they deserved it. Never mind the feelings of loved ones. I guess all of us with imperfections or differences are deemed expendable. That "logic" sounds familiar. Wasn't it espoused in "Mein Kampf"? RODNEY K. BOSWELL Los Angeles
SPORTS
July 20, 1991
This is in regard to the collapse of umpire John McSherry: Something should be done as to the condition and physical status of the major league umpires. We would not accept a player being as out of condition as some of these umpires are. These pillars, who are big parts in the game we love, seem to lumber and create a humorous image in a game where fitness is supposed to be accepted. B.L. THOMSEN Fawnskin, Calif.
SPORTS
April 6, 1987
Professional baseball made its first appearance in the nation's capital in 15 years Sunday as the New York Mets defeated the Philadelphia Phillies, 1-0, before 45,614 fans at Washington's RFK Stadium. The exhibition game, played in 38-degree temperature and a steady rain, was called by umpire John McSherry after five innings, a move that irritated many in the record crowd. The attendance figure represented the largest single-game baseball crowd ever in Washington.
SPORTS
April 7, 1996 | BILL PLASCHKE
At least he died an umpire's death. So said baseball's misty-eyed sages last week, and they were right. But not because John McSherry was wrapped in blue, or lying behind home plate, or working in the only city that still has an opening day parade. He died an umpire's death because he died alone. Every day of every summer, one of them dies alone. Maybe it's behind second base, a stumpy old manager spraying him with lunch, the crowd roaring for more.
SPORTS
October 13, 1985 | GORDON EDES, Times Staff Writer
Dodger rookie shortstop Mariano Duncan, still hurting after being spiked by Cardinal rookie Vince Coleman in Game 2, was unable to play Saturday, and his availability is uncertain for Game 4 tonight. "Right now, I don't know about Duncan," said Dodger Manager Tom Lasorda, who started Dave Anderson in Duncan's place. "He has tonight and most of tomorrow to improve." Trainer Bill Buhler said that Duncan has a bruise on the left calf, just below the knee. "He's better, but not 100% today."
SPORTS
April 6, 1996 | Associated Press
With tears streaming down his cheeks, umpire Eric Gregg talked about his friend, John McSherry, at a memorial service in New York for the 51-year-old umpire who died on opening day in Cincinnati. "There was nobody like him," Gregg said. "When I went to umpires school in 1971, he picked me up at the airport. He had that big voice. He said, 'You must be Eric Gregg.' "I modeled myself after him. I tried to call balls and strikes like he did. He was the ideal umpire, a big man with a big voice."
SPORTS
April 6, 1996
I'm perplexed by the news media's invariable description of umpire John McSherry's sudden death as "tragic." The man was over 50, dangerously overweight and had concomitant health problems. He also died doing what he loved to do for decades. I don't understand the "tragedy" here. Are the rest of us not going to die, or suffer apparently so little in the process? BOB GORE Santa Monica I find it difficult to conjure up sympathy for John McSherry, who weighed 328 pounds (probably more)
NEWS
April 2, 1996 | ROSS NEWHAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The start of the National League baseball season was clouded Monday when veteran umpire John McSherry, 51, collapsed in the first inning of a game between the Cincinnati Reds and Montreal Expos at Cincinnati's Riverfront Stadium and died of a heart attack. McSherry, beginning his 25th National League season, was working behind the plate when he called time, waved for umpire Steve Rippley at first base, then turned and began walking toward a gate behind the plate.
SPORTS
April 28, 1993 | ALLAN MALAMUD
Cancel that missing-persons report on Wayne Gretzky, Luc Robitaille, Tomas Sandstrom and Tony Granato. . . . The Kings will win most shootouts when these guys are on their game, and that is what happened Tuesday night in Calgary. . . . Unfortunately, the Flames will have the road-ice advantage Thursday at the Forum. . . . I could have sworn that was a rerun New York superstation WWOR showed Tuesday--an Orel Hershiser performance from 1988. . . .
SPORTS
July 20, 1991
This is in regard to the collapse of umpire John McSherry: Something should be done as to the condition and physical status of the major league umpires. We would not accept a player being as out of condition as some of these umpires are. These pillars, who are big parts in the game we love, seem to lumber and create a humorous image in a game where fitness is supposed to be accepted. B.L. THOMSEN Fawnskin, Calif.
SPORTS
October 2, 1990
Rich Garcia, Terry Cooney, John Hirschbeck, Larry McCoy, Vic Voltaggio and Jim Evans will umpire the American League playoffs, and Harry Wendelstedt, John McSherry, Dutch Rennert, Jerry Crawford, Gerry Davis and Paul Runge will work the National League playoffs.
SPORTS
April 6, 1996 | Associated Press
With tears streaming down his cheeks, umpire Eric Gregg talked about his friend, John McSherry, at a memorial service in New York for the 51-year-old umpire who died on opening day in Cincinnati. "There was nobody like him," Gregg said. "When I went to umpires school in 1971, he picked me up at the airport. He had that big voice. He said, 'You must be Eric Gregg.' "I modeled myself after him. I tried to call balls and strikes like he did. He was the ideal umpire, a big man with a big voice."
SPORTS
April 28, 1993 | ALLAN MALAMUD
Cancel that missing-persons report on Wayne Gretzky, Luc Robitaille, Tomas Sandstrom and Tony Granato. . . . The Kings will win most shootouts when these guys are on their game, and that is what happened Tuesday night in Calgary. . . . Unfortunately, the Flames will have the road-ice advantage Thursday at the Forum. . . . I could have sworn that was a rerun New York superstation WWOR showed Tuesday--an Orel Hershiser performance from 1988. . . .
SPORTS
June 17, 1989 | CURT HOLBREICH, Times Staff Writer
Jack McKeon tried one of the oldest managerial tricks in the book Friday night in an effort to fire up his Padres, but they remained lifeless. McKeon, incensed over a changed call that gave Houston's Glenn Davis a home run on a ball originally ruled foul, was thrown out of the game in the fourth inning by third base umpire John McSherry. But even the sight of their normally calm manager being ejected for the first time in 183 games since he took over the Padres was not enough to enliven his team.
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