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John Mcwhorter

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OPINION
December 3, 2005
Re "Don't believe the hype -- rap anger isn't a meaningful message," Current, Nov. 27 John McWhorter makes a common error when he labels Mos Def, Talib Kweli and Common as examples of "conscious" rappers. No serious hip-hop aficionado would hold them up as "conscious," because that term has lost any meaning it once held. All of the above represent the most mainstream strain of hip-hop, not an alternative to the mainstream. What critics often miss is the diverse and global world of independent hip-hop, which is so much larger than any empty marketing terms such as "conscious" or "gangsta."
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 2008 | Adam Mansbach, Special to The Times
Simultaneously smug and beleaguered, "All About the Beat: Why Hip-Hop Can't Save Black America" raises the question: Who, exactly, is claiming it can? No one -- academic, artist or critic -- has made any such argument since roughly 1988. This puts Manhattan Institute senior fellow John McWhorter in the awkward position of playing provocateur to an empty house, and gives his prose the tone of a petulant undergrad being shouted down in a dorm lounge.
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OPINION
September 10, 2004
Re "Why I'm Black, Not African American," by John McWhorter, Commentary, Sept. 8: Right on, Brother John! What gave Jesse Jackson the right to "rename" us? Let alone be ordained as our spiritual leader? I too never refer to myself as an "African American." I am an American, born and raised in Southern California. My deceased Negro father was born in Baltimore, and mother, who is white, was born in France. That does not make me a French citizen, though I love to visit that country. Hyphenation of any kind, (Asian American, Mexican American, etc.)
OPINION
December 3, 2005
Re "Don't believe the hype -- rap anger isn't a meaningful message," Current, Nov. 27 John McWhorter makes a common error when he labels Mos Def, Talib Kweli and Common as examples of "conscious" rappers. No serious hip-hop aficionado would hold them up as "conscious," because that term has lost any meaning it once held. All of the above represent the most mainstream strain of hip-hop, not an alternative to the mainstream. What critics often miss is the diverse and global world of independent hip-hop, which is so much larger than any empty marketing terms such as "conscious" or "gangsta."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 2001
Re "Why I Don't Want Reparations for Slavery," Commentary, July 15: I am so glad John McWhorter does not want reparations for slavery. That may leave more for those of us who realize reparations are deserved. Although I was born and raised in New Jersey, both of my late parents were born and raised in South Carolina, and both were grandchildren of slaves. As I grew up, I listened to the sordid accounts of murder, mayhem, beatings, other physical abuse, sexual abuse, degradation, humiliation, insults, separation of families and other dehumanizing actions heaped upon African slaves here in the United States.
OPINION
January 19, 2014 | By John McWhorter
Few things stick out more in black American speech than the pronunciation of "ask" as "ax. " And when I say that it "sticks out," I'm being polite. Attitudes about Ebonics have evolved somewhat as hip hop has become America's favorite music. Even the strictest grammarian would have to agree that Kanye West's "Gold Digger" in standard English wouldn't be worth hearing. And Americans from Jesse Pinkman in "Breaking Bad" to Key and Peele get that it's OK to speak "hood" when you're among friends.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 2008 | Adam Mansbach, Special to The Times
Simultaneously smug and beleaguered, "All About the Beat: Why Hip-Hop Can't Save Black America" raises the question: Who, exactly, is claiming it can? No one -- academic, artist or critic -- has made any such argument since roughly 1988. This puts Manhattan Institute senior fellow John McWhorter in the awkward position of playing provocateur to an empty house, and gives his prose the tone of a petulant undergrad being shouted down in a dorm lounge.
BOOKS
February 24, 2002 | GEOFFREY NUNBERG
"Man invented language!" That was the thesis that Johann Gottfried von Herder advanced in a famous 1772 essay that won the prize offered by the Berlin Academy for the most satisfactory answer to the question, "Left to their natural faculties, would men be capable of inventing language?"
NEWS
October 17, 2000 | LYNELL GEORGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The hope was that the "rough places will be made plain," the crooked places straight. That was the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.'s dream, sketched vividly from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial 37 summers ago. After the marches were over and public policy clicked into place, many Americans hoped that equality--racial parity--would not just be a wish but a statistical reality.
NEWS
September 8, 2004 | John McWhorter
It's time we descendants of slaves brought to the United States let go of the term "African American" and go back to calling ourselves Black -- with a capital B. Modern America is home now to millions of immigrants who were born in Africa. Their cultures and identities are split between Africa and the United States. They have last names like Onwughalu and Senkofa. They speak languages like Wolof, Twi, Yoruba and Hausa, and speak English with an accent.
OPINION
September 10, 2004
Re "Why I'm Black, Not African American," by John McWhorter, Commentary, Sept. 8: Right on, Brother John! What gave Jesse Jackson the right to "rename" us? Let alone be ordained as our spiritual leader? I too never refer to myself as an "African American." I am an American, born and raised in Southern California. My deceased Negro father was born in Baltimore, and mother, who is white, was born in France. That does not make me a French citizen, though I love to visit that country. Hyphenation of any kind, (Asian American, Mexican American, etc.)
BOOKS
February 24, 2002 | GEOFFREY NUNBERG
"Man invented language!" That was the thesis that Johann Gottfried von Herder advanced in a famous 1772 essay that won the prize offered by the Berlin Academy for the most satisfactory answer to the question, "Left to their natural faculties, would men be capable of inventing language?"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 2001
Re "Why I Don't Want Reparations for Slavery," Commentary, July 15: I am so glad John McWhorter does not want reparations for slavery. That may leave more for those of us who realize reparations are deserved. Although I was born and raised in New Jersey, both of my late parents were born and raised in South Carolina, and both were grandchildren of slaves. As I grew up, I listened to the sordid accounts of murder, mayhem, beatings, other physical abuse, sexual abuse, degradation, humiliation, insults, separation of families and other dehumanizing actions heaped upon African slaves here in the United States.
NEWS
October 17, 2000 | LYNELL GEORGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The hope was that the "rough places will be made plain," the crooked places straight. That was the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.'s dream, sketched vividly from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial 37 summers ago. After the marches were over and public policy clicked into place, many Americans hoped that equality--racial parity--would not just be a wish but a statistical reality.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 2010
SATURDAY Good Morning America (N) 7 a.m. KABC McLaughlin Group 6:30 p.m. KCET SUNDAY Today Chelsea Clinton's wedding; Bill Clegg. (N) 6 a.m. KNBC Good Morning America (N) 6 a.m. KABC State of the Union Race in America: Christopher Edley, UC Berkeley Law School; John McWhorter. President Obama and the business community: Mort Zuckerman; Steve Forbes. 6 and 9 a.m. CNN CBS News Sunday Morning Wayne Newton. (N) 7 a.m. KCBS Fareed Zakaria GPS Afghanistan and Pakistan: U.S. special representative Richard C. Holbrooke.
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