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John Mellencamp

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January 6, 2012 | By Gary Goldstein
For someone who's never directed a movie before, Kurt Markus sure has the eye of a filmmaker. His past as a successful photographer, whose work has appeared in Vanity Fair, Rolling Stone and in ad campaigns for BMW and Nike, serves him extremely well in the evocative documentary "John Mellencamp: It's About You," co-directed by Markus' son, Ian. In 2009, the Markus men, armed with Super 8 and still cameras, followed singer-songwriter John Mellencamp...
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 2012 | By Gary Goldstein
For someone who's never directed a movie before, Kurt Markus sure has the eye of a filmmaker. His past as a successful photographer, whose work has appeared in Vanity Fair, Rolling Stone and in ad campaigns for BMW and Nike, serves him extremely well in the evocative documentary "John Mellencamp: It's About You," co-directed by Markus' son, Ian. In 2009, the Markus men, armed with Super 8 and still cameras, followed singer-songwriter John Mellencamp...
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NEWS
November 18, 1992
John J. Cascella, 45, a keyboardist for rock singer John Mellencamp. Cascella, known for his work on accordion, joined the Mellencamp band 10 years ago and was an integral element of the group's folk-rock sound. Cascella also owned Cascella Productions, which created music for commercials and movies in Indianapolis. In Indianapolis on Saturday of an apparent heart attack.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 2012
Although "8 Murders a Day," Charlie Minn's disturbing documentary about the ultra-violent drug war in Juarez, Mexico, is somewhat repetitive and not terribly well-organized, it shines an important light on what the filmmaker deems "the greatest human rights disaster in the world today. " Aided by vivid archival news clips, you-are-there footage from the so-called "murder capital of the world" (Juarez saw more than 3,000 homicides in 2010 alone, hence the movie's title) and frank interviews with academics, reporters and first-hand observers, Minn lays blame for the border city's anguish largely on Felipe Calderon who, after being elected Mexico's president in 2006, waged what became a failed — and, some say, disingenuous — fight against Juarez's competing drug cartels.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 1991 | RICHARD CROMELIN, Richard Cromelin writes about pop music for Calendar.
R ock star and grandfather, oil paint and electric guitar, proud and self-deprecating, cynical and idealistic. . . . At 40, John Mellencamp remains a feisty bundle of contradictions. The Indiana native has been one of rock's top sellers since the early '80s, when he released such catchy, crunchy rock ditties as "Jack & Diane" and "Hurts So Good." Subsequently, his growing sense of mission and his adherence to rock's activist, '60s values linked him with Springsteenian idealism.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 1999 | STEVE APPLEFORD
In 1997, Mellencamp convened his touring band at an Indiana studio to record some old songs in sessions that were stripped down and surprisingly raw. The results, finally released here, are not quite revelatory, but suggest how Mellencamp might have better followed the promise of his 1985 "Scarecrow" album. Like that acclaimed record, such tracks as "Love and Happiness" demonstrate why passion wins over craftsmanship every time.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 1994 | JEAN ROSENBLUTH
A carefree--in some ways almost reckless--spirit informs Mellencamp's second album in nine months. It's the work of a man whose huge hits came several albums ago. Released from most of his own and others' commercial expectations, the prairie pop singer has rummaged through the stages of his career (dumb-boy rocker, socially conscious rocker, iconoclast rocker) to produce an eclectic, disarmingly straightforward--though surprisingly brief at 29 minutes--album.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 1992 | PETER RAINER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In "Falling From Grace," John Mellencamp, one of the leading practitioners of "heartland rock," stars as a phenomenally successful singer who returns to his Indiana hometown. Directed by Mellencamp from a script by Larry McMurtry, the result is a curious, wayward blend of small-town anomie and intrigue and hero-worshipping narcissism.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 1996 | ELYSA GARDNER
The title of Mellencamp's new album is surely intended to be taken with a grain of salt. But by today's standards, the singer does seem like a bit of a cockeyed optimist. As modern rock stars increasingly bemoan the shallowness and futility of life in the spotlight, this Hoosier at least has the common sense (and good taste) to distinguish major crises from petty ones. Mellencamp may brood at times, but he doesn't whine--certainly not on this effort, one of his most poised and moving in years.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 1991 | JEAN ROSENBLUTH
Prairie populist or pop singer? For most of the last decade, the man whose social conscience was once defined by "Hurts So Good" has struggled with his two identities, trying to make the jaunty, carefree spirit of the traditional rock 'n' roll music he has always written accommodate lyrics reflecting his burgeoning awareness of the world's woes.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 2011
As KCET officially becomes an independent public television station Saturday, no longer affiliated with the Public Broadcasting Service, a few more of its former programs have found homes. "Tavis Smiley," formerly seen on KCET weeknights at 7 and 11 p.m., will now be seen weeknights at 11 on KOCE, beginning Monday. "The Charlie Rose Show," which used to follow "Tavis Smiley" on KCET at 11:30 p.m., will now be airing opposite it at 11 p.m. on KVCR, also beginning Monday. With KCET dropping out of PBS in a dispute over dues, KOCE is now the noncommercial network's primary affiliate in the L.A.-Orange County area, offering such staples as "PBS NewsHour," "Nova," "Masterpiece," "Sesame Street," "Frontline" and "Great Performances.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 2010
The Early Show Ben Affleck. (N) 7 a.m. KCBS Today Jon Hamm; Oliver Stone; Terrence Howard and Taraji P. Henson. (N) 7 a.m. KNBC KTLA Morning News Brooke Shields. (N) 7 a.m. KTLA Good Morning America Katherine Schwarzenegger; Amy Brenneman. (N) 7 a.m. KABC The View Amy Brenneman ("Private Practice"); author Katherine Schwarzenegger. (N) 10 a.m. KABC The Doctors Stopping 24 health gaffes. (N) 11 a.m. KCAL The Oprah Winfrey Show The hostages from the Discovery headquarters incident.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 2010 | By Randy Lewis, Los Angeles Times
It's a tall order for any musician to one-up Bob Dylan, but John Mellencamp may have pulled it off in February when he and Dylan were invited to perform at the White House as part of a salute to music of the civil rights era. "Bob was nervous," Mellencamp said during a question-answer-performance session Tuesday at the Grammy Museum, which coordinated the White House event. When a few of the 200 members of the museum audience chuckled at the comment, Mellencamp added, "No, he was really nervous.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 2010 | By Katherine Tulich, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The Grammy Museum in downtown Los Angeles has been around only since 2009, but its intimate 200-seat Clive Davis Theater has already become one of the music industry's hottest rooms. In past months, participants in programs at the theater have included Ringo Starr, Annie Lennox, Dwight Yoakam, Herbie Hancock, Brian Wilson, Smokey Robinson, Carly Simon, Dionne Warwick and Heart. Every month, as part of the museum's public programs, legendary artists are invited to take the stage to talk about their history and latest projects, field questions from the audience and end the evening with an unplugged performance, often followed by a meet and greet and CD signing with audience members.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 2009 | Randy Lewis
The great thing about minor league baseball is the intimate view it gives those who relish the game itself more than the race to the World Series or the high-priced superstars. Bob Dylan offers much the same intimacy for music fans with another summer tour of minor league ballparks, accompanied this time by Willie Nelson, John Mellencamp and the Wiyos. Their only Southern California stop was Wednesday night at Diamond Park, the home of the Lake Elsinore Storm, the San Diego Padres' Class-A farm team.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 5, 2009 | Greg Kot; August Brown; Mikael Wood
Japandroids "Post-Nothing" (Polyvinyl) 1/2 Vancouver duo Brian King and David Prowse throw themselves into every song as if it's the last one they'll ever play. That go-for-broke attitude carries their third album, which is less about the songs than the sheer joy of playing them. King and Prowse suggest a couple of overgrown golden retriever pups playing fetch with a well-chewed tennis ball at the beach. King's guitar is less about virtuosity than texture, evoking an ocean wave big enough to surf or the relentless throb of a factory machine.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 1997 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"American Fool" was the album that vaulted John Mellencamp to rock stardom 15 years ago. Now, at 45, he has been acting like the American rock star with his head screwed on closest to straight. Mellencamp recently finished doing exactly what you'd figure every fabulously wealthy, super-famous rock star would do, but somehow never does. He turned his winter-spring tour into a pleasant working vacation by shunning one-night stands in vast arenas in favor of three- to five-night runs in theaters.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 2009 | Associated Press
This year's Farm Aid, the longest-running benefit concert in the United States, will be Oct. 4 at the Verizon Wireless Amphitheater in suburban St. Louis. Willie Nelson, Neil Young and John Mellencamp organized the first Farm Aid concert in 1985 to raise money for family farmers and draw attention to their plight. Farm Aid has raised nearly $35 million to help keep family farmers on their land.
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