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NEWS
December 23, 1995 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Many things are changing these days in what can now officially be called postwar Bosnia. And among them is the role of the U.S. ambassador. In an effort to avert a threatened exodus by Bosnian Serbs from the Sarajevo area, U.S. Ambassador to Bosnia John Menzies traveled to Serb-held territory this week and met with the mayors of two Serbian suburbs of Sarajevo.
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NEWS
December 23, 1995 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Many things are changing these days in what can now officially be called postwar Bosnia. And among them is the role of the U.S. ambassador. In an effort to avert a threatened exodus by Bosnian Serbs from the Sarajevo area, U.S. Ambassador to Bosnia John Menzies traveled to Serb-held territory this week and met with the mayors of two Serbian suburbs of Sarajevo.
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NEWS
April 23, 1995 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A group of U.S. and German diplomats flew out of Sarajevo airport after a nearly 24-hour standoff in which rebel Serbs refused to let them make the five-mile journey into the besieged capital. The group, which included John Menzies, the new acting U.S. ambassador to Bosnia-Herzegovina, had been scheduled to meet Bosnian President Alija Izetbegovic. But rebel Serbs, who control routes to and from the airport, refused to let the diplomats into Sarajevo because of a U.N.
NEWS
February 2, 1996 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the eve of the withdrawal of Serbian troops from Sarajevo suburbs, French special forces patrolling those districts Thursday killed a suspected sniper in response to a surge in sniper attacks, NATO said. And the war-legacy plague of land mines continued to claim victims: Two American soldiers were injured when one stepped on an antipersonnel mine as they inspected a minefield that had been identified as cleared.
NEWS
November 20, 2001 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
European foreign ministers Monday rejected calls for independence by moderate ethnic Albanian leader Ibrahim Rugova, whose party was headed toward victory in Kosovo's parliamentary elections. Rugova said Sunday that Kosovo, a province of Serbia, Yugoslavia's dominant republic, is ready for independence "today or tomorrow," and that he expected it within three years.
NEWS
March 5, 2002 | DAVID HOLLEY and BLERIM GJOCI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Moderate ethnic Albanian leader Ibrahim Rugova was elected president of Kosovo on Monday in a key step toward building the political structures of democratic self-rule--and perhaps toward ethnic reconciliation. A new parliament in the southern Serbian province also elected Bajram Rexhepi as prime minister. Rexhepi, 47, is a surgeon who broke with Rugova's party four years ago, then worked as a field doctor for the Kosovo Liberation Army.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 2001 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
"Never before on any screen!" "Stranger than you dared imagine!" "Parents, warn your children! It's ... Old People in Love!" No, this is definitely not the advertising campaign for Paul Cox's supergenteel "Innocence," but given how infrequently its subject matter is filmed, it might as well be.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 2001 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"The Low Down" is exactly what this English film doesn't deliver, for its maker, Jamie Thraves, reveals more about his central character in the publicity notes than on the screen. Thraves' first feature is so personal that he seems too close to it to make it very involving. And close-up it is: Thraves is forever having his cinematographer stick the camera smack in the face of his hero, Frank, and at other random objects as well, for reasons most often known only to him.
NEWS
January 5, 1996 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Under pressure from Washington and Belgrade, Bosnian Serbs on Thursday relented in their first head-on challenge to the Bosnian peace accord and freed 16 Muslims seized when they tried to travel through Serb-held territory relying on NATO guarantees.
NEWS
October 20, 1995 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Children streamed by the hundreds from the ruins of their homes to greet the arriving convoy of big white cars. They stood by the road, waved and begged for candy. Women with their babies crossed the bridge over the Drina River, where rigged paddle-wheel contraptions turn water into electricity, enough for a single light bulb. Young men in uniform lounged in the central square and watched dogs play. Old men sat by 10-foot piles of freshly cut firewood, a preparation for winter.
NEWS
September 21, 1995 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
NATO and the United Nations on Wednesday called off air strikes against Bosnian Serbs after determining that the rebels had complied with demands for withdrawal of their heavy guns from around this besieged capital. Halting the aerial bombing campaign takes pressure off the Bosnian Serbs, who in the past 10 days have suffered their greatest territorial losses in 3 1/2 years of war. It may also clear the way for a cease-fire, U.N. officials said.
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