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John Mike Mcconnell

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NEWS
February 20, 1991 | From a Times Staff Writer
The Pentagon presented its first visual evidence Tuesday that Iraq faked bomb damage to a mosque in the southern city of Basra earlier this month and that it then exploited the alleged damage for propaganda purposes. Displaying sanitized intelligence drawings and one air reconnaissance photo, Rear Adm.
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NEWS
January 22, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and J. MICHAEL KENNEDY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
With Iraq's extensive army and air force surprisingly inactive so far, the Pentagon predicted Monday that the allied effort will not require a ground war that "takes months or years." In the first five days of the war, the United States and its allies have been virtually unimpeded in their air strikes. Iraqi command and control is clearly disrupted, although the degree of damage is unclear, military briefers said in Washington and Saudi Arabia.
NEWS
February 27, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In the face of increasingly lurid stories of Iraqi atrocities in Kuwait, the United States and its Arab allies are coming under increasing pressure to put Iraqi soldiers, as well as their leader, Saddam Hussein, on trial for war crimes, officials say. With tens of thousands of Iraqi troops already being held as prisoners of war, experts say they are sure that at least some of the soldiers went beyond the bounds of permissible military action.
NEWS
January 29, 1991 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To correspondents and those watching the Pentagon's daily briefings on television, the sessions have become known as the "Tom and Mike Hour"--a daily back-and-forth between the press corps and the military's senior overseers of operations and intelligence. For Lt. Gen. Thomas W. Kelly, 59, director of operations for the Joint Chiefs of Staff, the war in the Persian Gulf is neither the first one he has experienced nor the first he has overseen.
NEWS
February 24, 1991 | DAVID LAMB and JOHN BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Allied commanders accused Iraq on Saturday of conducting "a systematic campaign of execution" in occupied Kuwait, which a variety of reports suggested is suffering an intensifying devastation by the Iraqis. "This is terrorism at its finest hour," said Marine Brig. Gen. Richard I. Neal, U.S. military spokesman in Riyadh, charging that Iraqi soldiers were killing Kuwaiti civilians previously subjected to torture.
NEWS
February 17, 1991 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY and JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As troops, war machinery and supply trucks, stretching from horizon to horizon, rolled into position Saturday for a long-awaited ground assault into Kuwait, U.S. and allied warplanes bombed Iraqi forces so hard just across the front lines that they rocked U.S. Marines in their foxholes.
NEWS
March 3, 1991 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Allied troops buried Iraq's dead in mass graves Friday, while the remnants of Iraqi President Saddam Hussein's army roamed or hid in the battle-torn desert--some apparently unaware that the Gulf War had been called off. An American doctor and a medical specialist were killed by land mines, and U.S. infantrymen exchanged gunfire with Iraqi soldiers shooting from a bus stopped at a checkpoint. Six Iraqis were killed and six wounded, Saudi sources said.
NEWS
January 22, 1991 | MARK FINEMAN and JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Iraq announced Monday that it will use its captured American and allied airmen as human shields against the relentless air attack on Iraqi targets, prompting U.S. officials to accuse Saddam Hussein of committing war crimes. "America is angry about this," said President Bush, who vowed that the threat will not prompt him to relax the U.S. offensive.
NEWS
February 2, 1991 | JOHN M. BRODER and J. MICHAEL KENNEDY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
U.S. warplanes Friday pummeled Iraqi troops and armored vehicles moving along the Kuwaiti border with Saudi Arabia, but the aim of the Iraqi movement remained unclear. U.S. and Saudi officials said allied forces seized at least 400 Iraqi prisoners of war in two days of clashes in and near the Saudi town of Khafji that ended Thursday night. Also Friday, officials confirmed that an AC-130 Spectre gunship had been shot down in southern Iraq early Thursday.
NEWS
February 3, 1991 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY and KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Allied warplanes raked Iraqi troops with some of the heaviest bombing of the Persian Gulf War on Saturday, scattering one unit of the elite Republican Guard and blowing up airfields, tanks and armored personnel carriers. But the Iraqis, vowing to retaliate with everything from kitchen knives to "weapons of mass destruction," shot down two American planes--the first in two days. They used antiaircraft fire, but U.S. officers said it came from scattered guns and was not centrally controlled.
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